wgcmc

Hike the Palmer Hill Trail | Thursday, April 26, 10:00 AM

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Palmer Hill

Get out for an early Spring hike on the Palmer Hill Trails. The always great views, including to the western high peaks, will be even better with the leaves off the trees.

Event Duration:  4 miles, 3 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Easy-Moderate

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Escarpment Trail at Kaaterskill Clove and Hardytown LP Traverse | Sunday, July 8, 9:00 AM

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This hike follows the ESCARPMENT above Kaaterskill Clove, with views across the clove and out to the Hudson River Valley. We’ll follow the Harding Road Trail down the slopes of South Mountain.

Do join us for a lovely hike full of fabulous views and wildflowers! Hike about 7.2 miles over steep terrain with many views and scrambles. The yellow marked White Road sectionwill be included for All Trails Challenge hikers. See NYNJTC map #141 map and inset.

Event Duration:  7.2 miles, 6-7 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Moderate-Difficult

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Andes Rail Trail Gets Some Big Improvements

April 10, 2018

IMG_5326Parking has always been a bit tricky for visitors to the Andes Rail Trail and Bullet Hole Spur, but no longer. There has been a great improvement to the parking situation thanks to the Town of Andes, landscaper Mel Bellar and CMC board member Ann Roberti. The entrance to the Trail and to the historic train station has been opened up and improved so that parking is now available adjacent to the trailhead. The trailhead itself has a newly redesignedIMG_5323 entrance. The parking area was paved with crushed stone by LaFever Excavating. While there, they generously donated work to improve a long existing drainage problem on the trail. The CMC thanks all those involved in these projects for a great job.

Hike to Split Rock | Thursday, May 10, 10:00 am

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Split Rock

Nice spring walk out to Split Rock and return. Just a short hike for a spring day. Spring ephemeral wildflowers may be in bloom.

Event Duration:  3 miles, 2.5 hours

Level of Difficulty: Moderate

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Annual Ephemeral Wildflower Hike @ Kelly Hollow | Sunday, May 13th, 11:00 AM

Trout Lilly D

Trout Lily

This a chance to find and identify the beautiful Spring Ephemeral wildflowers which are so named because they appear above ground in early spring when they flower and fruit and then die back into the ground, all in a short period before the trees have had a chance to leaf out. Most hikers never see these flowers because they wait for late spring or summer to get into the woods. We will look for Trillium, Spring beauties, Trout Lily, Hepatica, Violets, Squirrel Corn, Dutchman’s Britches, Jack-In-The-Pulpit and many others. We may also find some early mushrooms.

Kelly Hollow is one of the most beautiful short trails in the Catskills with rocky streams and waterfalls. It has a combination of coniferous and deciduous forests with the remains of a lovely beaver pond near a lean-to at the top. The trail is an easy to moderate loop of about 4 miles. Bring lunch and/or snacks to have at the lean-to (there is a privy nearby.) Continue reading

Hiking the Bluelines: Cascade Brook to Panther Mountain/Giant Ledge | Saturday, October 13, 9:00 AM

Diamond Notch Falls-MikeTodaroThis is a series of nine hikes sponsored by the Catskill Mountain Club (CMC) and led by Team Danger Girl (TDG), a Catskill Mountain-based hiking group. Join members of TDG for a scientific and exploratory engagement with Catskill mountain streams. Dorcinda Knauth and Dany Davis will lead this series of off trail explorations. Dany is a geologist with 17 years of experience studying Catskill Mountain streams and will lead the scientific part of these explorations. Other environmental scientists may join some of the hikes. The theme of these hikes can be along the lines of the saying “the journey is the destination”. In other words, the purpose of these hikes is not to put peaks in a collection bag, so the summit is not the ultimate destination. Instead, the hikes will focus on landscape interpretation, exploring wild sections of popular mountains by following the paths of streams, collecting data for a regional Catskill streams study, and maybe getting to the top of a mountain on some of the hikes.

There will be two categories of hikes: off trail adventurous explorations and trail-side family friendly engagements with streams. Both categories will include plenty of time sharing observations of the stream channel, ecosystem and riparian environment. We will stop often for discussions on the role of streams in the mountains, collecting some data on the stream’s shape and condition, as well as sharing lessons in landscape interpretation.

The family friendly hikes will focus on hands-on engagement in studying a stream at specific stream locations, walking the stream channel corridor to observe changes (expect to get wet) and encourage hikers to appreciate the role of streams in the Catskill environment. If children join, it would be best for the children to be school age and capable of hiking a couple of miles. These hikes will be limited to 10 participants plus the hike leaders (maximum group size is 12-14 depending on the hike).

The adventurous off trail explorations will be stream corridor bushwhacks up/down wild Catskill mountain terrain with some trail hiking. Science will be a central part of these hikes and there may be more stream data collection than in the family friendly hikes. The hikes are rated “Most Difficult” due to the variability of the headwater stream terrain, hiking in steep boulder streams, plenty of downed trees, and the ever present unknown one encounters when heading up/down a steep mountain drainage. Each of these hikes will have a mountain summit destination in mind; however, the science and exploration is the primary goal. Conditions may preclude getting to the top of the mountain. The hikes will be limited to 6-8 people plus the hike leaders (no more than 8-10 hikers total). Please note: your hike leaders will not have previously hiked some of these routes so obstacles to forward progress are unknown for some of these hikes – that is part of the adventure. Each hiker will need to consider themselves expert in off trail hiking in mountains. Footwear should be capable of hiking in and out of water (no sandals!).

Cascade Brook to Panther Mountain/Giant Ledge. Rating: Difficult. Meeting Place: Giant Ledge PA. The hike will include walking down CR47 to Cascade Brook (~1 mile) to reach the stream route up Panther Mountain then walking along the left descending side of the stream to stay on NYS land for the first 0.5 miles. After that, the hike stays in the stream drainage until it disappears in the talus below Panther’s summit. The route up Panther will be along a SW-trending ridge to the summit view point. From there the return hike is via trail to Giant Ledge and back to the PA. Be prepared for biting insects, loose rocks and other stream scrambling hazards, thick forest, cliffy bits and Catskill yetis. Total Distance: ~7 miles.

Event Duration:  7 miles, 9 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Difficult

Leader(s): Team Danger Girl

Bring: lunch, snacks, beverages (2-3 qts).; boots and clothes suitable for bush and stream whacking; optional shoes for walking in streams; headlamp (recommended)/flashlight, bug protection/repellant.

Registration required by October 11.  Register by contacting the leader. See below.

Group size is limited to 8, so register early.

Dogs allowed:  No.

Questions about this event can be directed to: Dany Davis at wddavis2@gmail.com

Driving Directions: Meeting Place: Giant Ledge PA.

From SR 28 in Big Indian, go south 7.3 miles on Oliverea/Frost Valley Rd./Rte. 47 to the parking area on the right.

Hiking the Bluelines: An Exploration of Woodland Creek’s Headwaters | Saturday, September 15, 8:00 AM

Diamond Notch Falls-MikeTodaroThis is a series of nine hikes sponsored by the Catskill Mountain Club (CMC) and led by Team Danger Girl (TDG), a Catskill Mountain-based hiking group. Join members of TDG for a scientific and exploratory engagement with Catskill mountain streams. Dorcinda Knauth and Dany Davis will lead this series of off trail explorations. Dany is a geologist with 17 years of experience studying Catskill Mountain streams and will lead the scientific part of these explorations. Other environmental scientists may join some of the hikes. The theme of these hikes can be along the lines of the saying “the journey is the destination”. In other words, the purpose of these hikes is not to put peaks in a collection bag, so the summit is not the ultimate destination. Instead, the hikes will focus on landscape interpretation, exploring wild sections of popular mountains by following the paths of streams, collecting data for a regional Catskill streams study, and maybe getting to the top of a mountain on some of the hikes.

There will be two categories of hikes: off trail adventurous explorations and trail-side family friendly engagements with streams. Both categories will include plenty of time sharing observations of the stream channel, ecosystem and riparian environment. We will stop often for discussions on the role of streams in the mountains, collecting some data on the stream’s shape and condition, as well as sharing lessons in landscape interpretation.

The family friendly hikes will focus on hands-on engagement in studying a stream at specific stream locations, walking the stream channel corridor to observe changes (expect to get wet) and encourage hikers to appreciate the role of streams in the Catskill environment. If children join, it would be best for the children to be school age and capable of hiking a couple of miles. These hikes will be limited to 10 participants plus the hike leaders (maximum group size is 12-14 depending on the hike).

The adventurous off trail explorations will be stream corridor bushwhacks up/down wild Catskill mountain terrain with some trail hiking. Science will be a central part of these hikes and there may be more stream data collection than in the family friendly hikes. The hikes are rated “Most Difficult” due to the variability of the headwater stream terrain, hiking in steep boulder streams, plenty of downed trees, and the ever present unknown one encounters when heading up/down a steep mountain drainage. Each of these hikes will have a mountain summit destination in mind; however, the science and exploration is the primary goal. Conditions may preclude getting to the top of the mountain. The hikes will be limited to 6-8 people plus the hike leaders (no more than 8-10 hikers total). Please note: your hike leaders will not have previously hiked some of these routes so obstacles to forward progress are unknown for some of these hikes – that is part of the adventure. Each hiker will need to consider themselves expert in off trail hiking in mountains. Footwear should be capable of hiking in and out of water (no sandals!).

An exploration of Woodland Creek’s headwaters TBD. Rating: Most Difficult. Meeting Place: Woodland Valley Campground PA. The plan will be to bushwhack across the base of the Wittenberg along NYS land to the headwater reaches of Woodland Creek. From there, the assembled group will pick a route up any of the several branches of Woodland Creek, potentially ascending Slide, Cornell or Wittenberg; or just turning around and heading back to the PA. Be prepared for biting insects, stinging nettles, loose rocks and other stream scrambling hazards, thick forest, cliffy bits and Catskill yetis. Total Distance: ~7-12 miles.

Event Duration:  7-12 miles, 11 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Most Difficult, Bushwhack

Leader(s): Team Danger Girl

Bring: lunch, snacks, beverages (2-3 qts).; boots and clothes suitable for bush and stream whacking; optional shoes for walking in streams; headlamp (recommended)/flashlight, bug protection/repellant.

Registration required by September 13.  Register by contacting the leader. See below.

Group size is limited to 8, so register early.

Dogs allowed:  No.

Questions about this event can be directed to: Dany Davis at wddavis2@gmail.com

Driving Directions: Meeting Place: Woodland Valley Campground PA.

From SR 28 in Phoenicia, go west to Woodland Valley Rd and turn south. Cross the Esopus Creek bridge and turn right. Go 5 miles to the parking area. Be sure to pay the day use fee at the DEC office.

Cancelled: Hiking the Bluelines: Explore East Branch Neversink River Headwaters and Slide Mountain | Saturday, August 4, 8:00 AM

Diamond Notch Falls-MikeTodaroThis is a series of nine hikes sponsored by the Catskill Mountain Club (CMC) and led by Team Danger Girl (TDG), a Catskill Mountain-based hiking group. Join members of TDG for a scientific and exploratory engagement with Catskill mountain streams. Dorcinda Knauth and Dany Davis will lead this series of off trail explorations. Dany is a geologist with 17 years of experience studying Catskill Mountain streams and will lead the scientific part of these explorations. Other environmental scientists may join some of the hikes. The theme of these hikes can be along the lines of the saying “the journey is the destination”. In other words, the purpose of these hikes is not to put peaks in a collection bag, so the summit is not the ultimate destination. Instead, the hikes will focus on landscape interpretation, exploring wild sections of popular mountains by following the paths of streams, collecting data for a regional Catskill streams study, and maybe getting to the top of a mountain on some of the hikes.

There will be two categories of hikes: off trail adventurous explorations and trail-side family friendly engagements with streams. Both categories will include plenty of time sharing observations of the stream channel, ecosystem and riparian environment. We will stop often for discussions on the role of streams in the mountains, collecting some data on the stream’s shape and condition, as well as sharing lessons in landscape interpretation.

The family friendly hikes will focus on hands-on engagement in studying a stream at specific stream locations, walking the stream channel corridor to observe changes (expect to get wet) and encourage hikers to appreciate the role of streams in the Catskill environment. If children join, it would be best for the children to be school age and capable of hiking a couple of miles. These hikes will be limited to 10 participants plus the hike leaders (maximum group size is 12-14 depending on the hike).

The adventurous off trail explorations will be stream corridor bushwhacks up/down wild Catskill mountain terrain with some trail hiking. Science will be a central part of these hikes and there may be more stream data collection than in the family friendly hikes. The hikes are rated “Most Difficult” due to the variability of the headwater stream terrain, hiking in steep boulder streams, plenty of downed trees, and the ever present unknown one encounters when heading up/down a steep mountain drainage. Each of these hikes will have a mountain summit destination in mind; however, the science and exploration is the primary goal. Conditions may preclude getting to the top of the mountain. The hikes will be limited to 6-8 people plus the hike leaders (no more than 8-10 hikers total). Please note: your hike leaders will not have previously hiked some of these routes so obstacles to forward progress are unknown for some of these hikes – that is part of the adventure. Each hiker will need to consider themselves expert in off trail hiking in mountains. Footwear should be capable of hiking in and out of water (no sandals!).

Explore East Branch Neversink River Headwaters and Slide Mountain. Rating: Difficult. Meeting place: Denning PA in the Town of Denning. The hike will start at the East Branch-Phoenicia trail to access the East Branch Neversink River valley. Depending on the ability and interest of the participants we will hike up the East Branch Neversink River or the Deer Shanty Brook toward Slide Mountain. The hike will focus on exploring the valley and stream environment and may include a bushwack summit of Slide Mountain if it seems feasible.  Total Distance is variable; assume a minimum 7 miles.

Event Duration:   7+ miles, 11 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Difficult

Leader(s): Team Danger Girl

Bring: lunch, snacks, beverages (2 qts).; boots and clothes suitable for bush and stream whacking; optional shoes for walking in streams; bug protection/repellant.

Registration required by August 2.  Register by contacting the leader. See below.

Group size is limited to 10, so register early.

Dogs allowed:  No.

Questions about this event can be directed to: Dany Davis at wddavis2@gmail.com

Driving Directions:  Meeting place:  Denning parking area.

From SR 28 in Big Indian go south on CR 47/Oliverea-Frost Valley Rd. about 20 miles to Claryville. Turn east onto Denning Rd. and continue about 8 miles to the parking area.

From SR 55 just west of Grahamsville, turn north 4 miles to Claryville.  Turn east onto Denning Rd. and continue about 8 miles to the parking area.

Hiking the Bluelines: Family Friendly Exploration of Kanape Brook | Saturday, June 23, 10:00 AM

Diamond Notch Falls-MikeTodaroThis is a series of nine hikes sponsored by the Catskill Mountain Club (CMC) and led by Team Danger Girl (TDG), a Catskill Mountain-based hiking group. Join members of TDG for a scientific and exploratory engagement with Catskill mountain streams. Dorcinda Knauth and Dany Davis will lead this series of off trail explorations. Dany is a geologist with 17 years of experience studying Catskill Mountain streams and will lead the scientific part of these explorations. Other environmental scientists may join some of the hikes. The theme of these hikes can be along the lines of the saying “the journey is the destination”. In other words, the purpose of these hikes is not to put peaks in a collection bag, so the summit is not the ultimate destination. Instead, the hikes will focus on landscape interpretation, exploring wild sections of popular mountains by following the paths of streams, collecting data for a regional Catskill streams study, and maybe getting to the top of a mountain on some of the hikes.

There will be two categories of hikes: off trail adventurous explorations and trail-side family friendly engagements with streams. Both categories will include plenty of time sharing observations of the stream channel, ecosystem and riparian environment. We will stop often for discussions on the role of streams in the mountains, collecting some data on the stream’s shape and condition, as well as sharing lessons in landscape interpretation.

The family friendly hikes will focus on hands-on engagement in studying a stream at specific stream locations, walking the stream channel corridor to observe changes (expect to get wet) and encourage hikers to appreciate the role of streams in the Catskill environment. If children join, it would be best for the children to be school age and capable of hiking a couple of miles. These hikes will be limited to 10 participants plus the hike leaders (maximum group size is 12-14 depending on the hike).

The adventurous off trail explorations will be stream corridor bushwhacks up/down wild Catskill mountain terrain with some trail hiking. Science will be a central part of these hikes and there may be more stream data collection than in the family friendly hikes. The hikes are rated “Most Difficult” due to the variability of the headwater stream terrain, hiking in steep boulder streams, plenty of downed trees, and the ever present unknown one encounters when heading up/down a steep mountain drainage. Each of these hikes will have a mountain summit destination in mind; however, the science and exploration is the primary goal. Conditions may preclude getting to the top of the mountain. The hikes will be limited to 6-8 people plus the hike leaders (no more than 8-10 hikers total). Please note: your hike leaders will not have previously hiked some of these routes so obstacles to forward progress are unknown for some of these hikes – that is part of the adventure. Each hiker will need to consider themselves expert in off trail hiking in mountains. Footwear should be capable of hiking in and out of water (no sandals!).

Family friendly exploration of Kanape Brook with a possible visit to the summit of Ashokan High Point. Rating: Moderate. Meeting Place: Kanape Brook PA in the Town of Olive. The hike will include stopping at specific locations along the brook to observe channel and riparian forest conditions. Data collection will be part of the activities for a local study, and participants will be shown techniques for participation. Be prepared for biting insects, stinging nettles, loose rocks and other stream scrambling hazards, and very excitable stream scientists! Total Distance: ~3 miles for the stream (out and back) or 7-8 if including Ashokan High Point.

Event Duration:   3-8 miles tbd, 6 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Moderate

Leader(s): Team Danger Girl

Bring: lunch, snacks, beverages (2 qts).; boots and clothes suitable for bush and stream whacking; optional shoes for walking in streams; bug protection/repellant.

Registration required by June 21.  Register by contacting the leader. See below.

Group size is limited to 10, so register early.

Dogs allowed:  No.

Questions about this event can be directed to: Dany Davis at wddavis2@gmail.com

Driving Directions:  Meeting Place: Kanape Brook PA

From SR 28 in Boiceville, go south 5.6 miles on Rte. 28A to West Shokan. Turn west onto Watson Hollow Rd./ Rte. 42. Go 4 miles to parking area on the right.

Hiking the Bluelines: West Kill stream to Hunter Mountain | Saturday, July 7, 9:00 AM

Diamond Notch Falls-MikeTodaroThis is a series of nine hikes sponsored by the Catskill Mountain Club (CMC) and led by Team Danger Girl (TDG), a Catskill Mountain-based hiking group. Join members of TDG for a scientific and exploratory engagement with Catskill mountain streams. Dorcinda Knauth and Dany Davis will lead this series of off trail explorations. Dany is a geologist with 17 years of experience studying Catskill Mountain streams and will lead the scientific part of these explorations. Other environmental scientists may join some of the hikes. The theme of these hikes can be along the lines of the saying “the journey is the destination”. In other words, the purpose of these hikes is not to put peaks in a collection bag, so the summit is not the ultimate destination. Instead, the hikes will focus on landscape interpretation, exploring wild sections of popular mountains by following the paths of streams, collecting data for a regional Catskill streams study, and maybe getting to the top of a mountain on some of the hikes.

There will be two categories of hikes: off trail adventurous explorations and trail-side family friendly engagements with streams. Both categories will include plenty of time sharing observations of the stream channel, ecosystem and riparian environment. We will stop often for discussions on the role of streams in the mountains, collecting some data on the stream’s shape and condition, as well as sharing lessons in landscape interpretation.

The family friendly hikes will focus on hands-on engagement in studying a stream at specific stream locations, walking the stream channel corridor to observe changes (expect to get wet) and encourage hikers to appreciate the role of streams in the Catskill environment. If children join, it would be best for the children to be school age and capable of hiking a couple of miles. These hikes will be limited to 10 participants plus the hike leaders (maximum group size is 12-14 depending on the hike).

The adventurous off trail explorations will be stream corridor bushwhacks up/down wild Catskill mountain terrain with some trail hiking. Science will be a central part of these hikes and there may be more stream data collection than in the family friendly hikes. The hikes are rated “Most Difficult” due to the variability of the headwater stream terrain, hiking in steep boulder streams, plenty of downed trees, and the ever present unknown one encounters when heading up/down a steep mountain drainage. Each of these hikes will have a mountain summit destination in mind; however, the science and exploration is the primary goal. Conditions may preclude getting to the top of the mountain. The hikes will be limited to 6-8 people plus the hike leaders (no more than 8-10 hikers total). Please note: your hike leaders will not have previously hiked some of these routes so obstacles to forward progress are unknown for some of these hikes – that is part of the adventure. Each hiker will need to consider themselves expert in off trail hiking in mountains. Footwear should be capable of hiking in and out of water (no sandals!).

West Kill stream to Hunter Mountain. Most Difficult. Meeting place: West Kill Trailhead. This hike is likely to be the most challenging and should only be attempted by those capable of hiking in the Catskill’s most rugged terrain. This will involve hiking the West Kill stream corridor up the drainage toward the summit of Hunter Mountain.  The approach to Hunter’s summit will involve very steep terrain in thick balsam forest (what fun!). If Hunter is summited, the hike may take a trail back down or, if adventure prevails take another stream back down. Be prepared for biting insects, loose rocks and other stream scrambling hazards, thick forest, cliffy bits and Catskill yetis. Total Distance: 7-10 miles depending upon the route.

Event Duration:  7-10 miles, 11 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Most Difficult

Leader(s): Team Danger Girl

Bring: lunch, snacks, beverages (2 qts).; boots and clothes suitable for bush and stream whacking; optional shoes for walking in streams; bug protection/repellant.

Registration required by July 5.  Register by contacting the leader. See below.

Group size is limited to 10, so register early.

Dogs allowed:  No.

Questions about this event can be directed to: Dany Davis at wddavis2@gmail.com

Driving Directions:  West Kill Trailhead at the end of Spruceton Rd. From CR 42 in West Kill turn east into the Spruceton Valley. CR 42 intersects SR 28 in Shandaken and SR 23A in Lexington.

Hiking the Bluelines: Family Friendly Exploration Hike to Rochester Hollow Creek | Cancelled

Diamond Notch Falls-MikeTodaroThis is a series of nine hikes sponsored by the Catskill Mountain Club (CMC) and led by Team Danger Girl (TDG), a Catskill Mountain-based hiking group. Join members of TDG for a scientific and exploratory engagement with Catskill mountain streams. Dorcinda Knauth and Dany Davis will lead this series of off trail explorations. Dany is a geologist with 17 years of experience studying Catskill Mountain streams and will lead the scientific part of these explorations. Other environmental scientists may join some of the hikes. The theme of these hikes can be along the lines of the saying “the journey is the destination”. In other words, the purpose of these hikes is not to put peaks in a collection bag, so the summit is not the ultimate destination. Instead, the hikes will focus on landscape interpretation, exploring wild sections of popular mountains by following the paths of streams, collecting data for a regional Catskill streams study, and maybe getting to the top of a mountain on some of the hikes.

There will be two categories of hikes: off trail adventurous explorations and trail-side family friendly engagements with streams. Both categories will include plenty of time sharing observations of the stream channel, ecosystem and riparian environment. We will stop often for discussions on the role of streams in the mountains, collecting some data on the stream’s shape and condition, as well as sharing lessons in landscape interpretation.

The family friendly hikes will focus on hands-on engagement in studying a stream at specific stream locations, walking the stream channel corridor to observe changes (expect to get wet) and encourage hikers to appreciate the role of streams in the Catskill environment. If children join, it would be best for the children to be school age and capable of hiking a couple of miles. These hikes will be limited to 10 participants plus the hike leaders (maximum group size is 12-14 depending on the hike).

The adventurous off trail explorations will be stream corridor bushwhacks up/down wild Catskill mountain terrain with some trail hiking. Science will be a central part of these hikes and there may be more stream data collection than in the family friendly hikes. The hikes are rated “Most Difficult” due to the variability of the headwater stream terrain, hiking in steep boulder streams, plenty of downed trees, and the ever present unknown one encounters when heading up/down a steep mountain drainage. Each of these hikes will have a mountain summit destination in mind; however, the science and exploration is the primary goal. Conditions may preclude getting to the top of the mountain. The hikes will be limited to 6-8 people plus the hike leaders (no more than 8-10 hikers total). Please note: your hike leaders will not have previously hiked some of these routes so obstacles to forward progress are unknown for some of these hikes – that is part of the adventure. Each hiker will need to consider themselves expert in off trail hiking in mountains. Footwear should be capable of hiking in and out of water (no sandals!).

Explore Rochester Hollow Creek. Rating: Moderate. Meeting place: Rochester Hollow PA in the Town of Shandaken. This will involve meeting at the Rochester Hollow parking area and taking the trail up the valley for approximately 1.5 miles and then returning back to the parking area by way of the stream.  The hike will include stopping at specific locations to observe stream channel and riparian forest conditions.  Data collection will be part of the activities for a local study, and participants will be shown techniques for participation. Be prepared for biting insects, stinging nettles, Loose rocks and other stream scrambling hazards, and very excitable stream scientists!  Total Distance: ~ 3 miles.

Event Duration:   3 miles, 5 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Moderate

Leader(s): Team Danger Girl

Bring: lunch, snacks, beverages (2 qts).; boots and clothes suitable for bush and stream whacking; optional shoes for walking in streams; bug protection/repellant.

Registration required by July 19.  Register by contacting the leader. See below.

Group size is limited to 10, so register early.

Dogs allowed:  No.

Questions about this event can be directed to: Dany Davis at wddavis2@gmail.com

Driving Directions:  From SR 28 in Big Indian go west about 1 mile to Matyas Rd. Turn north to the parking area.

Hiking the Bluelines: Biscuit Brook to Fir Mountain | Saturday, June 2, 8 AM

Diamond Notch Falls-MikeTodaroThis is a series of nine hikes sponsored by the Catskill Mountain Club (CMC) and led by Team Danger Girl (TDG), a Catskill Mountain-based hiking group. Join members of TDG for a scientific and exploratory engagement with Catskill mountain streams. Dorcinda Knauth and Dany Davis will lead this series of off trail explorations. Dany is a geologist with 17 years of experience studying Catskill Mountain streams and will lead the scientific part of these explorations. Other environmental scientists may join some of the hikes. The theme of these hikes can be along the lines of the saying “the journey is the destination”. In other words, the purpose of these hikes is not to put peaks in a collection bag, so the summit is not the ultimate destination. Instead, the hikes will focus on landscape interpretation, exploring wild sections of popular mountains by following the paths of streams, collecting data for a regional Catskill streams study, and maybe getting to the top of a mountain on some of the hikes.

There will be two categories of hikes: off trail adventurous explorations and trail-side family friendly engagements with streams. Both categories will include plenty of time sharing observations of the stream channel, ecosystem and riparian environment. We will stop often for discussions on the role of streams in the mountains, collecting some data on the stream’s shape and condition, as well as sharing lessons in landscape interpretation.

The family friendly hikes will focus on hands-on engagement in studying a stream at specific stream locations, walking the stream channel corridor to observe changes (expect to get wet) and encourage hikers to appreciate the role of streams in the Catskill environment. If children join, it would be best for the children to be school age and capable of hiking a couple of miles. These hikes will be limited to 10 participants plus the hike leaders (maximum group size is 12-14 depending on the hike).

The adventurous off trail explorations will be stream corridor bushwhacks up/down wild Catskill mountain terrain with some trail hiking. Science will be a central part of these hikes and there may be more stream data collection than in the family friendly hikes. The hikes are rated “Most Difficult” due to the variability of the headwater stream terrain, hiking in steep boulder streams, plenty of downed trees, and the ever present unknown one encounters when heading up/down a steep mountain drainage. Each of these hikes will have a mountain summit destination in mind; however, the science and exploration is the primary goal. Conditions may preclude getting to the top of the mountain. The hikes will be limited to 6-8 people plus the hike leaders (no more than 8-10 hikers total). Please note: your hike leaders will not have previously hiked some of these routes so obstacles to forward progress are unknown for some of these hikes – that is part of the adventure. Each hiker will need to consider themselves expert in off trail hiking in mountains. Footwear should be capable of hiking in and out of water (no sandals!).

Biscuit Brook to Fir Mountain. Rating: Difficult. Meeting place: Biscuit Brook trailhead. This will involve hiking the Biscuit Brook trail to the NYS land/Frost Valley land boundary and then following the stream corridor to the col between Big Indian and Fir Mountains. If Fir Mountain is summited the return trip will be by herdpath and trail back to the Biscuit Brook trailhead, or if adventure prevails the unnamed stream between Fir and Spruce Mountains. There will be ongoing research in this watershed by Colorado State University so we may get some fresh insights into Catskill stream geomorphology! Be prepared for biting insects, stinging nettles, loose boulders and other stream scrambling hazards, thick forest, cliffy bits and Catskill yetis. Total Distance: 8-10 miles depending upon the route.

Event Duration:  8-10 miles, hours

Level of Difficulty:  Most Difficult, Bushwhack

Leader(s): Team Danger Girl

Bring: lunch, snacks, beverages (2-3 qts).; boots and clothes suitable for bush and stream whacking; optional shoes for walking in streams; headlamp (recommended)/flashlight, bug protection/repellant.

Registration required by May 31.  Register by contacting the leader. See below.

Group size is limited to 8, so register early. NOTE: This hike is full.

Dogs allowed:  No.

Questions about this event can be directed to: Dany Davis at wddavis2@gmail.com

Driving Directions:  Meet at the Biscuit Brook Trailhead.

From the North: Turn south from SR 28 in Big Indian onto Oliverea-Frost Valley Rd./ Rte. 47. Go 12.6 miles to the trailhead parking on the left.

From the South: From SR 55 turn north on Claryville Rd. to Claryville. Continue north on Rte. 157 to Rte. 47/ Frost Valley Rd., and then go 6.7 miles to the trailhead on the right.

Hiking the Bluelines: Hunter Brook or West Kill stream to Hunter Mountain | Saturday, May 12, 8:00 AM

Diamond Notch Falls-MikeTodaroThis is a series of nine hikes sponsored by the Catskill Mountain Club (CMC) and led by Team Danger Girl (TDG), a Catskill Mountain-based hiking group. Join members of TDG for a scientific and exploratory engagement with Catskill mountain streams. Dorcinda Knauth and Dany Davis will lead this series of off trail explorations. Dany is a geologist with 17 years of experience studying Catskill Mountain streams and will lead the scientific part of these explorations. Other environmental scientists may join some of the hikes. The theme of these hikes can be along the lines of the saying “the journey is the destination”. In other words, the purpose of these hikes is not to put peaks in a collection bag, so the summit is not the ultimate destination. Instead, the hikes will focus on landscape interpretation, exploring wild sections of popular mountains by following the paths of streams, collecting data for a regional Catskill streams study, and maybe getting to the top of a mountain on some of the hikes.

There will be two categories of hikes: off trail adventurous explorations and trail-side family friendly engagements with streams. Both categories will include plenty of time sharing observations of the stream channel, ecosystem and riparian environment. We will stop often for discussions on the role of streams in the mountains, collecting some data on the stream’s shape and condition, as well as sharing lessons in landscape interpretation.

The family friendly hikes will focus on hands-on engagement in studying a stream at specific stream locations, walking the stream channel corridor to observe changes (expect to get wet) and encourage hikers to appreciate the role of streams in the Catskill environment. If children join, it would be best for the children to be school age and capable of hiking a couple of miles. These hikes will be limited to 10 participants plus the hike leaders (maximum group size is 12-14 depending on the hike).

The adventurous off trail explorations will be stream corridor bushwhacks up/down wild Catskill mountain terrain with some trail hiking. Science will be a central part of these hikes and there may be more stream data collection than in the family friendly hikes. The hikes are rated “Most Difficult” due to the variability of the headwater stream terrain, hiking in steep boulder streams, plenty of downed trees, and the ever present unknown one encounters when heading up/down a steep mountain drainage. Each of these hikes will have a mountain summit destination in mind; however, the science and exploration is the primary goal. Conditions may preclude getting to the top of the mountain. The hikes will be limited to 6-8 people plus the hike leaders (no more than 8-10 hikers total). Please note: your hike leaders will not have previously hiked some of these routes so obstacles to forward progress are unknown for some of these hikes – that is part of the adventure. Each hiker will need to consider themselves expert in off trail hiking in mountains. Footwear should be capable of hiking in and out of water (no sandals!).

Hunter Brook or West Kill stream to Hunter Mountain. Most Difficult. Meeting place: Spruceton Trailhead. This hike is likely to be the most challenging and should only be attempted by those capable of hiking in the Catskill’s most rugged terrain. This will involve hiking the Hunter Brook or West Kill stream corridor up the drainage toward the summit of Hunter Mountain. The approach to Hunter’s summit will involve very steep terrain in thick balsam forest (what fun!). If Hunter is summited, the hike may take a trail back down or, if adventure prevails take another stream back down. Be prepared for biting insects, loose rocks and other stream scrambling hazards, thick forest, cliffy bits and Catskill yetis. Total Distance: 7-10 miles depending upon the route.

Event Duration:  7-10 miles, hours

Level of Difficulty:  Most Difficult, Bushwhack

Leader(s): Team Danger Girl

Bring: lunch, snacks, beverages (2-3 qts).; boots and clothes suitable for bush and stream whacking; optional shoes for walking in streams; headlamp (recommended)/flashlight, bug protection/repellant.

Registration required by May 10.  Register by contacting the leader. See below.

Group size is limited to 8, so register early.  NOTE: This hike is full.

Dogs allowed:  No.

Questions about this event can be directed to: Dany Davis at wddavis2@gmail.com

Driving Directions: Meet at the Spruceton Trail trailhead. From CR 47 in West Kill, turn east onto Spruceton Rd. and continue 6.7 miles to the trailhead.

Hiking the Bluelines: Bear Hole Brook to Van Wyck Mountain | Saturday, May 5, 8:00 AM

Diamond Notch Falls-MikeTodaroThis is a series of nine hikes sponsored by the Catskill Mountain Club (CMC) and led by Team Danger Girl (TDG), a Catskill Mountain-based hiking group. Join members of TDG for a scientific and exploratory engagement with Catskill mountain streams. Dorcinda Knauth and Dany Davis will lead this series of off trail explorations. Dany is a geologist with 17 years of experience studying Catskill Mountain streams and will lead the scientific part of these explorations. Other environmental scientists may join some of the hikes. The theme of these hikes can be along the lines of the saying “the journey is the destination”. In other words, the purpose of these hikes is not to put peaks in a collection bag, so the summit is not the ultimate destination. Instead, the hikes will focus on landscape interpretation, exploring wild sections of popular mountains by following the paths of streams, collecting data for a regional Catskill streams study, and maybe getting to the top of a mountain on some of the hikes.

There will be two categories of hikes: off trail adventurous explorations and trail-side family friendly engagements with streams. Both categories will include plenty of time sharing observations of the stream channel, ecosystem and riparian environment. We will stop often for discussions on the role of streams in the mountains, collecting some data on the stream’s shape and condition, as well as sharing lessons in landscape interpretation.

The family friendly hikes will focus on hands-on engagement in studying a stream at specific stream locations, walking the stream channel corridor to observe changes (expect to get wet) and encourage hikers to appreciate the role of streams in the Catskill environment. If children join, it would be best for the children to be school age and capable of hiking a couple of miles. These hikes will be limited to 10 participants plus the hike leaders (maximum group size is 12-14 depending on the hike).

The adventurous off trail explorations will be stream corridor bushwhacks up/down wild Catskill mountain terrain with some trail hiking. Science will be a central part of these hikes and there may be more stream data collection than in the family friendly hikes. The hikes are rated “Most Difficult” due to the variability of the headwater stream terrain, hiking in steep boulder streams, plenty of downed trees, and the ever present unknown one encounters when heading up/down a steep mountain drainage. Each of these hikes will have a mountain summit destination in mind; however, the science and exploration is the primary goal. Conditions may preclude getting to the top of the mountain. The hikes will be limited to 6-8 people plus the hike leaders (no more than 8-10 hikers total). Please note: your hike leaders will not have previously hiked some of these routes so obstacles to forward progress are unknown for some of these hikes – that is part of the adventure. Each hiker will need to consider themselves expert in off trail hiking in mountains. Footwear should be capable of hiking in and out of water (no sandals!).

Bear Hole Brook to Van Wyck Mountain. Rating: Most Difficult. Meeting Place: Bear Hole Brook PA on Ulster County Route 42 (Peekamoose Road). The inaugural Bluelines hike will include stream-whacking up Bear Hole Brook to access the Catskill Divide between Van Wyck and Table Mountains. The return trip will be via the Van Wyck ridge. Be prepared for biting insects, loose rocks and other stream scrambling hazards, thick forest, cliffy bits and Catskill yetis. Total Distance: 6-8 miles depending upon the route.

Event Duration:  6-8 miles, 10 hours

Level of Difficulty: Most Difficult, Bushwhack

Leader(s): Team Danger Girl

Bring: lunch, snacks, beverages (2-3 qts).; boots and clothes suitable for bush and stream whacking; optional shoes for walking in streams; headlamp (recommended)/flashlight, bug protection/repellant.

Registration required by May 3.  Register by contacting the leader. See below.

Group size is limited to 8, so register early.  NOTE: This hike is full.

Dogs allowed:  No.

Questions about this event can be directed to:  Dany Davis at wddavis2@gmail.com

Driving Directions: Meet at Bear Hole Brook PA on Ulster County Route 42 (Peekamoose Road).

From the North: Take Rte. 28A to West Shokan turn west onto Watson Hollow Rd. (CR 42). 10 miles to the trailhead.

From the South: Turn north from SR 55/55A towards Sundown. Continue on Peekamoose Rd. 3 miles to the trailhead.

 

Hiking the Bluelines: Exploring Catskill Mountain Streams

Diamond Notch Falls-MikeTodaro

Diamond Notch Falls

This is a series of nine hikes sponsored by the Catskill Mountain Club (CMC) and led by Team Danger Girl (TDG), a Catskill Mountain-based hiking group. Join members of TDG for a scientific and exploratory engagement with Catskill mountain streams. Dorcinda Knauth and Dany Davis will lead this series of off trail explorations. Dany is a geologist with 17 years of experience studying Catskill Mountain streams and will lead the scientific part of these explorations. Other environmental scientists may join some of the hikes. The theme of these hikes can be along the lines of the saying “the journey is the destination”. In other words, the purpose of these hikes is not to put peaks in a collection bag, so the summit is not the ultimate destination. Instead, the hikes will focus on landscape interpretation, exploring wild sections of popular mountains by following the paths of streams, collecting data for a regional Catskill streams study, and maybe getting to the top of a mountain on some of the hikes.

There will be two categories of hikes: off trail adventurous explorations and trail-side family friendly engagements with streams. Both categories will include plenty of time sharing observations of the stream channel, ecosystem and riparian environment. We will stop often for discussions on the role of streams in the mountains, collecting some data on the stream’s shape and condition, as well as sharing lessons in landscape interpretation.

The family friendly hikes will focus on hands-on engagement in studying a stream at specific stream locations, walking the stream channel corridor to observe changes (expect to get wet) and encourage hikers to appreciate the role of streams in the Catskill environment. If children join, it would be best for the children to be school age and capable of hiking a couple of miles. These hikes will be limited to 10 participants plus the hike leaders (maximum group size is 12-14 depending on the hike).

The adventurous off trail explorations will be stream corridor bushwhacks up/down wild Catskill mountain terrain with some trail hiking. Science will be a central part of these hikes and there may be more stream data collection than in the family friendly hikes. The hikes are rated “Most Difficult” due to the variability of the headwater stream terrain, hiking in steep boulder streams, plenty of downed trees, and the ever present unknown one encounters when heading up/down a steep mountain drainage. Each of these hikes will have a mountain summit destination in mind; however, the science and exploration is the primary goal. Conditions may preclude getting to the top of the mountain. The hikes will be limited to 6-8 people plus the hike leaders (no more than 8-10 hikers total). Please note: your hike leaders will not have previously hiked some of these routes so obstacles to forward progress are unknown for some of these hikes – that is part of the adventure. Each hiker will need to consider themselves expert in off trail hiking in mountains. Footwear should be capable of hiking in and out of water (no sandals!).

See event listing links below for details. Contact Dany Davis at wddavis2@gmail.com with questions about the hikes and to register.

The proposed hikes and schedule are subject to change:

May 5  8AM – Dark

Bear Hole Brook to Van Wyck Mountain. Rating: Most Difficult. Meeting Place: Bear Hole Brook PA on Ulster County Route 42 (Peekamoose Road). The inaugural Bluelines hike will include stream-whacking up Bear Hole Brook to access the Catskill Divide between Van Wyck and Table Mountains. The return trip will be via the Van Wyck ridge. Be prepared for biting insects, loose rocks and other stream scrambling hazards, thick forest, cliffy bits and Catskill yetis. Total Distance: 6-8 miles depending upon the route.  NOTE: This hike is full.

June 2  8AM – Dark

Biscuit Brook to Fir Mountain. Rating: Difficult. Meeting place: Biscuit Brook trailhead. This will involve hiking the Biscuit Brook trail to the NYS land/Frost Valley land boundary and then following the stream corridor to the col between Big Indian and Fir Mountains. If Fir Mountain is summited the return trip will be by herdpath and trail back to the Biscuit Brook trailhead, or if adventure prevails the unnamed stream between Fir and Spruce Mountains. There will be ongoing research in this watershed by Colorado State University so we may get some fresh insights into Catskill stream geomorphology! Be prepared for biting insects, stinging nettles, loose boulders and other stream scrambling hazards, thick forest, cliffy bits and Catskill yetis. Total Distance: 8-10 miles depending upon the route.  NOTE: This hike is full.

June 23 10AM – 4PM

Explore Kanape Brook watershed to the summit of Ashokan High Point. Rating: Moderate. Meeting Place: Kanape Brook PA in the Town of Olive. The hike will include stopping at specific locations along the brook to observe channel and riparian forest conditions. Data collection will be part of the activities for a local study, and participants will be shown techniques for participation.  Be prepared for biting insects, stinging nettles, loose rocks and other stream scrambling hazards, and very excitable stream scientists!  Total Distance: ~3 miles for the stream (out and back) or 7-8 if including Ashokan High Point.

July 7 9AM – Dark

West Kill stream to Hunter Mountain. Most Difficult. Meeting place: West Kill Trailhead. This hike is likely to be the most challenging and should only be attempted by those capable of hiking in the Catskill’s most rugged terrain. This will involve hiking the West Kill stream corridor up the drainage toward the summit of Hunter Mountain.  The approach to Hunter’s summit will involve very steep terrain in thick balsam forest (what fun!). If Hunter is summited, the hike may take a trail back down or, if adventure prevails take another stream back down. Be prepared for biting insects, loose rocks and other stream scrambling hazards, thick forest, cliffy bits and Catskill yetis. Total Distance: 7-10 miles depending upon the route.

July 21 10AM – 4PM

Explore Rochester Hollow Creek. Rating: Moderate. Meeting place: Rochester Hollow PA in the Town of Shandaken. This will involve meeting at the Rochester Hollow parking area and taking the trail up the valley for approximately 1.5 miles and then returning back to the parking area by way of the stream.  The hike will include stopping at specific locations to observe stream channel and riparian forest conditions.  Data collection will be part of the activities for a local study, and participants will be shown techniques for participation. Be prepared for biting insects, stinging nettles, Loose rocks and other stream scrambling hazards, and very excitable stream scientists!  Total Distance: ~ 3 miles.

August 4 8AM – 7PM

Explore East Branch Neversink River Headwaters and Slide Mountain. Rating: Difficult. Meeting place: Denning PA in the Town of Denning. The hike will start at the East Branch-Phoenicia trail to access the East Branch Neversink River valley. Depending on the ability and interest of the participants we will hike up the East Branch Neversink River or the Deer Shanty Brook toward Slide Mountain. The hike will focus on exploring the valley and stream environment and may include a bushwack summit of Slide Mountain if it seems feasible.  Total Distance is variable; assume a minimum 7 miles.

September 15 8AM – 7PM

An exploration of Woodland Creek’s headwaters TBD. Rating: Most Difficult. Meeting Place: Woodland Valley Campground PA. The plan will be to bushwhack across the base of the Wittenberg along NYS land to the headwater reaches of Woodland Creek. From there, the assembled group will pick a route up any of the several branches of Woodland Creek, potentially ascending Slide, Cornell or Wittenberg; or just turning around and heading back to the PA. Be prepared for biting insects, stinging nettles, loose rocks and other stream scrambling hazards, thick forest, cliffy bits and Catskill yetis. Total Distance: ~7-12 miles.

October 13 9AM – 6PM

Cascade Brook to Panther Mountain/Giant Ledge. Rating: Difficult. Meeting Place: Giant Ledge PA. The hike will include walking down CR47 to Cascade Brook (~1 mile) to reach the stream route up Panther Mountain then walking along the left descending side of the stream to stay on NYS land for the first 0.5 miles. After that, the hike stays in the stream drainage until it disappears in the talus below Panther’s summit. The route up Panther will be along a SW-trending ridge to the summit view point. From there the return hike is via trail to Giant Ledge and back to the PA. Be prepared for biting insects, loose rocks and other stream scrambling hazards, thick forest, cliffy bits and Catskill yetis. Total Distance: ~7 miles.

Volunteer with the CMC! You’ll Love It (and so will We).

CMC_logo_border_220x220Do You Have Some Time to Spare? Love to Pitch in on a Community Project? Looking for a Good Excuse to Get Out of the House (and Into the Woods)? We’ve Got You Covered!

We admit it. We’ve got big eyes. We look around at all of the great things happening in the Catskills and we want to jump into the action. But, alas, we could use lots more help. Here’s what’s coming up. See something that appeals? Just get in touch with us and we’ll tell you how you can help.

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Catskills: Places to Go for Hiking, Camping, Cycling, Kayaking, XC Skiing, Fishing & more

The Catskill Mountain Region is Over 6,000 Square Miles….Where Should You Begin?

Are you new to the Catskills or not familiar with the location of our public lands and recreational resources? Looking for some good suggestions on where to go hiking, camping, boating, cycling, fishing, or cross-country skiing in the Catskills? In a region larger than the state of Connecticut, here are some suggestions to get you started.

NOTE: The NYSDEC has developed several accessible recreation facilities in the Catskills for individuals with disabilities. For a complete list go to the DEC’s Accessible Recreation Destinations page and search their lists for Delaware, Greene, Sullivan and Ulster Counties.

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Choose a vicinity below to view some of the many outdoor pursuits in the Catskill Mountain region.
In the Park
NORTHERN  SOUTHERN  WESTERN

Outside the Park
NORTHEAST          NORTHWEST         SOUTHEAST         SOUTHWEST
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Looking for a 2-3 night Backpacking Idea?
Read an account of a wonderful camping trip taken starting at Little Pond.

NORTHERN Catskill Park

Strenuous Hikes:

  • Blackhead Range – Traverse the three high peaks that define the skyline of the northern Catskill Park; Thomas Cole (elev. 3,940′), Blackhead (elev. 3,940′), and Black Dome (elev. 3,980′). Mileage approx. 5-6 miles one-way depending on route. Scenic view points. NY/NJ TC Catskills Trail Map #41.
  • Devil’s Path – Doing even a small chunk of the 23-mile Devil’s Path can be considered an extremely strenuous hike, however the rewards are numerous and unforgettable. Indian Head, Twin, Sugarloaf, and Twin are signature Catskill high peaks, and Plateau, Southwest Hunter, and Westkill Mountains will give you a better workout than you could ever pay for at a gym. Once you make it up to the spruce-fir summits, all of your troubles will disappear in the breeze. Amazing vistas from bluestone ledges will turn you into a romantic such as the likes of Thomas Cole and Washington Irving.

Moderate Hikes:

  • Dibble’s Quarry and Pecoy Notch – A moderate hike of 1.9 miles one-way will take you through classic Catskills northern hardwood forest and typical rock outcrops, then to an abandoned bluestone quarry with modern-day charm, on to a tumbling stream through a hemlock ravine, up to a high-mountain beaver meadow, and finally to the rugged notch between Twin and Sugarloaf Mountains (elevation gain 1,000’).. More ambitious hikers can ascend the Devil’s Path to the summits on either side of the notch. Scenic views at Dibble’s Quarry and summits of Twin and Sugarloaf Mountains. NY/NJ TC Catskills Trail Map #41.
  • Huckleberry Point – Hike from the magical Platte Clove up onto the lower flanks of Kaaterskill High Peak and then out to a rocky promontory with fantastic views of the Hudson Valley, Platte Clove, and Indian Head Range. 2.5 miles one-way; gradual ascents. NY/NJ TC Catskills Trail Map #41

Easy Hikes:

  • Catskill Mountain House Site and Artists Rock – Accessed via North-South Lake State Campground, this is arguably the foremost classic scenic view in the Catskill Park (along with the view of North-South Lake and South Mountain from North Mountain). The Catskill Mountain House Site is a short stroll from the parking areas at the campground and boasts an incredible panorama of the Hudson Valley. Artists Rock (0.5-mile from campground), Boulder Rock (0.75-mile from campground), and Sunset Rock (1.3-miles from campground) also have great views. This legendary area was America’s first great tourist destination and was visited by president’s, artists and the rich and powerful for over a century. NY/NJ TC Catskills Trail Map #40 and #41.
  • Diamond Notch Falls – At the end of Spruceton Road park in the area on the right. Hike up the Diamond Notch Trail along the West Kill for .7 miles to the falls. This is a great place for a picnic or to just explore and sit around.

Primitive Camping:

  • Elm Ridge Lean-to in the Elm Ridge Wild Forest
  • Devil’s Acre Lean-to in the Hunter-West Kill Wilderness

Cross-Country Skiing:

  • Mountain Trails Cross Country Ski Center

Ice Skating

Flatwater Canoeing/Kayaking:

  • Colgate Lake – Enjoy scenic views of the Blackhead Range while paddling lazily on this pretty out-of-the-way lake. This lake supports trout. NY/NJ TC Catskills Trail Map #41.

River Canoeing/Kayaking:

  • Schoharie Creek from Lexington to Prattsville. Nine miles of flatwater and Class I-III rapids flowing through a beautiful valley. See if you can spot a bald eagle looking for trout.

Trout Fishing:

  • Schoharie Creek
  • West Kill

Warm-water Fishing:

  • Lake Rip Van Winkle in Tannersville
  • Colgate Lake in Greene County
  • Note: Colgate Lake is an Accessible Recreation Destination site. See link above.

Mountain Biking:

  • Hunter Mountain Ski Area
  • Ski Windham
  • Elm Ridge Wild Forest

Cycling:

  • Moderate: The ride in Spruceton Valley from CR 42 to the head of the valley is one of the most beautiful and pleasant rides in the Catskills. Light traffic and nearly flat terrain with mountain ranges on both the north and south sides of the valley make for a wonderful outing.15 miles, round trip.
  • Feeling fiesty? Ride over Deep Notch from the hamlet of Shandaken for a full day’s outing.
  • Bonus: At the end of the road, leave your bike and hike .7 miles along the West Kill to Diamond Notch Falls.
  • Strenuous: CR 23C in the Towns of Jewett and Hunter offers spectacular scenery and rolling terrain on a quiet country road. 25 miles round trip. Have a meal and a brew in Tannersville at the end of your trip.

SOUTHERN Catskill Park

Strenuous Hikes:

  • Table and Peekamoose Mountains – Start in from the end of Denning Road, for a hike of 3.9 miles one-way to the summit of Table Mountain (elevation gain 1,700′), and another 0.85-mile brings you to the summit of Peekamoose. Alternate approach is 3.9 miles one-way to summit of Peekamoose Mountain, from Peekamoose Road (Ulster Co. Rt. 42)., (elevation gain 2,640′). Enjoy the magic kingdom of the spruce-fir forest that crowns our highest Catskill peaks.
  • Wittenberg Mountain – This is a tough hike with an enormous pay-off. Starting at the Woodland Valley Parking Area ( pay fee from mid-May to mid-October), hike up the Wittenberg-Cornell-Slide Trail 3.9 miles to the summit. The spectacular views over the Ashokan Reservoir and to the Devil’s Path Range are to die for. The summit elevaton is 3780′ with a climb of 2430′.

Moderate Hikes:

  • Giant Ledge – Arguably the most “bang for the buck” in the Catskills, a short hike with some huffing and puffing is rewarded by breathtaking views on a series of 250′ high open ledges. To the east are views of the nearby Burroughs Range and to the west views of the high peaks of the Big Indian Wilderness. 3 miles out and back.
  • Bonus: Go in late May to early June for the pinxsters (azaleas) growing out of the ledges. Find bunchberries, yellow clintonia and more along the trail.

Easy Hikes:

  • Red Hill Fire Tower – A 1.35-mile hike through a pleasant forest, uphill but not too steep, leads you to the Red Hill Fire Tower. Thanks to volunteer efforts, the tower is now completely restored and open to the public. Enjoy 360-degree views of the mountains. The old ranger cabin, open on most weekends in summer, now has old photographs and other interpretive material about the days when the tower was used by the State for spotting forest fires.
  • Ashokan Reservoir – Hike on a paved trail along the south shore of the reservoir over a dam and on a berm. The views to the Devil’s Path Trail on the east end of the hike and to the Burroughs Range west of the reservoir are stunning. Watch the bald eagles fishing and soaring. Round trip between the parking areas on SR 28A is about 5½ miles.

Primitive Camping:

  • Biscuit Brook lean-to in the Big Indian Wilderness
  • Rochester Hollow lean-to in the Shandaken Wild Forest
  • Note: The Rochester Hollow lean-to is an Accessible Recreation Destination site. See link above.

Cross-Country Skiing:

  • Rochester Hollow in Big Indian. This beautiful trail offers excellent skiing for the intermediate skier.
  • Belleayre Mountain Ski Area. There are trails for beginners and for those with advanced skills.

Flatwater Canoeing/Kayaking:

  • Mongaup Pond – A 120 acre lake, the largest in the Catskills other than the NYC reservoirs, complete with a campground, swimming and boat rentals for paddling.

River Canoeing/Kayaking:

  • The Esopus Creek has several good places to put in/take out. Conditions can be easy to difficult depending on water depth, with releases from a NYC water supply tunnel at Allaben common for the summer weekends.  Class II-III rapids.

Trout Fishing:

  • Willowemoc Creek– One of the legendary trout streams that made the Catskills famous for trout fishing beginning in the mid to late-1800’s. The “Willow” is natural, free-flowing river that holds some beautiful fish and beautiful surroundings. Public fishing areas can be found at several sections along the course of the river. Generally typical Catskills fly hatches and fly patterns, according to the time of the season. Some sections open year round for catch and release only. Don’t forget to visit the non-profit Catskill Fly Fishing Center and Museum, between Livingston Manor and Roscoe to learn about our rich Catskill Mountains fly fishing heritage.

Warm-water Fishing:

  • Mongaup Pond (see above)

Mountain Biking:

  • Belleayre Mountain Ski Area – no lifts for bicycles at this time, but ORDA is working on making that feature available.
  • Willowemoc Wild Forest – The trail system around Frick and Hodge Ponds and out to Quick Lake is extensive. The more appropriate snowmobile trails are open to mountain biking, but so are hiking trails. Use caution and be ready to yield to hikers.

Cycling:

  • Moderate: Woodland Valley Rd. from Phoenicia out and back. A beautiful, peaceful ride in one of the Catskills most beautiful valleys. 12.6 miles round trip.
  • Strenuous: Ride CR 47 (Oliverea-Slide Mtn.-Frost Valley Rd.) from Big Indian to SR 55 just south of Claryville. Go east to SR55A towards Sundown and continue to West Shokan on the Sundown-Peekamoose-Watson Hollow Rd. Turn north on SR28A to Boiceville and then northwest on SR 28, returning to Big Indian. Significant climbing, 64 miles.

WESTERN Catskill Park

Strenuous Hikes:

  • Dry Brook Ridge from Margaretville to Mill Brook Rd. This is a high ridge hike with long views west to the Pepacton Reservoir from several ledges. 9.6 miles.
  • Balsam Lake Mountain – By continuing south on the Dry Brook Ridge Trail another 2.2 miles to the junction with the Balsam Lake Mountain Trail you can climb this Catskills high peak (3720′) which treats you to a fire tower on its summit.
  • Bonus: Go on the weekend (spring through fall) and gain access to the fire tower cab and the interpretive knowledge of its keepers.

Moderate Hikes:

  • Kelly Hollow – A nice loop trail through both serene hardwoods and deep dark Norway spruce plantations. Lean-to for camping next to a small beaver pond.

Easy Hikes:

  • Alder Lake – Once you see what a beautiful place Alder Lake is, you’ll want to keep it to yourself. A bowl in the mountains, surrounded by State land. Great for canoeing, tent camping, and brook trout fishing. A one-mile loop trail circles the lake, mostly flat and dry. The old abandoned Coykendall mansion looking over the lake is quickly succumbing to a sad state of decay, but is still architecturally interesting. A spectacular place when the fall foliage peaks.
  • Waneta Lake – A pretty little lake that most people drive by without giving a second thought to. Hike over the “stepping stones” on the dam, and look for a yellow trail on the far side of the lake, leading to a handful of designated tent camping sites.

Primitive Camping:

  • Beaver Meadow lean-to in the Balsam Lake Mountain Wild Forest
  • Trout Pond lean-to in the Cherry Ridge Wild Forest
  • Note: The Trout Pond lean-to is an Accessible Recreation Destination site. See link above.

Cross-Country Skiing:

  • Kelly Hollow in the Balsam Lake Mountain Wild Forest is a designated cross country ski area. Intermediate to advanced.

Ice Skating

  • Livingston Manor rink in Rotary Park on Pleasant Street in Livingson Manor — it has a Facebook page! (Pleasant Street is one block southwest of the stoplight on Main Street)

Flatwater Canoeing/Kayaking:

  • Big Pond – A real find for those who have never traveled down Barkaboom Road. The beautiful mountain setting of this medium-sized, deep lake will keep you coming back, as will the bald eagles and great fishing. Open for trout fishing year-round, which makes Big Pond a Catskills hot-spot for ice-fishing in winter. Pitch your tent at one of four designated campsites.
  • Alder Lake – A medium sized pond that is perfect for casual paddling. The launch is a short distance from the parking area. There have been regular bald eagle sightings as well as other water fowl. A good place for a swim, too.
  • Pepacton Reservoir — newly opened by the NYC DEP, the Pepacton, along with the Schoharie, Neversink and Cannonsville reservoirs, are great places to do flat water paddling.   Serenity and wildlife abound on these reservoirs.  Boat rentals are available locally or, if you have your own boat it must be steam cleaned before bringing it to the launch site.   Read more about the reservoir boating program here, and the Pepacton specifically hereincluding information on rentals and steam cleaning vendors.  Get or renew your DEP Access Permit here.

River Canoeing/Kayaking:

  • East Branch Delaware River
    • Above the Pepaction reservoir you can paddle the slow moving East Branch into or out of Lake Wawaka in Halcottsville for a quiet scenic tour.  Boat rentals available at Susan’s Pleasant Pheasant Farm.
    • Below the Pepacton Reservoir, water releases from the keep this river flowing steady even during dry summer months. Release water is very cold, which helps the healthy population of wild trout, but can make for painful swimming or wading in bare skin, at least in the upper stretches. A classic 5-mile float trip is from Rt. 206/30 bridge just above Downsville to the bridge in Shinhopple. Canoe/kayak rental available in Downsville.

Trout Fishing:

  • Beaverkill River – Steeped in lore and legend, the Beaverkill is the preeminent American trout stream. It is the river that made the Catskills famous as the birthplace of American fly-fishing. Very little public access upstream of Roscoe, but many places to get on the river below Roscoe. Many fly shops and guides in the area. Best to fish at off-peak times when you can find some elbow room. River supports a great wild population of trout, mostly browns, but also rainbows and brookies.
  • Pepacton Reservoir – The biggest brown trout in the Catskills, and perhaps the east, swim in the Pepacton. The reservoir is part of the New York City water supply system, and requires a permit to access. Fish from shore or rowboat just about anywhere in the spring, then go deep during the summer. Live bait fish (usually sawbellies) and shiny spoons (most notably Krocodiles) are proven methods. Water levels fluctuate depending on seasonal rainfall fluctuations. Beware of mercury contamination and other State health advisories.

Warm-water Fishing:

  • Pepacton Reservoir – When the hot summer weather slows down the trout fishing, many anglers turn their attention to hard-fighting “bronzebacks” (smallmouth bass) of the Pepacton and other NYC reservoirs. Cruise the shoreline with fly or spinning rod, looking for good structure such as rock ledges and drop- offs. Access permit required; shore fishing or rowboats only. Water levels fluctuate depending on seasonal rainfall fluctuations; beware of mercury contamination and other State health advisories.
  • Waneta Lake in the Willowemoc Wild Forest – see above    Note: Waneta Lake is an Accessible Recreation Destination site. See link above.

Mountain Biking:

  • Snow-mobile Trail off Morton Hill Road – Ride 2.5 miles one-way on an old road bed to the unnamed peaks north of Morton Hill.

Cycling:

  • Moderate: Ride from the parking area just south and west of the intersection of SR 28 and Reservoir Rd. to the Shavertown Bridge on a quiet back road. This gently rolling route offers spectacular views of the reservoir and the surrounding mountains. 10 miles one way. Complete you trip by returning the via the same route or cross the bridge and follow SR 30 back to Reservoir Rd. and your car. Loop 19.7 miles.
  • Strenuous: Ride a complete loop around the Pepacton Reservoir. This route has significant climbing on its northern section. Start at the SR28/30 intersection west of Margaretville and ride to Downville, using the roads that hug the north side of the reservoir. Then travel back to your starting point via SR 30, BWS Road 8, Reservoir Rd. and SR 28/30. 51 miles.

NORTHEASTERN Catskill Region
(Outside the Catskill Park)

Strenuous Hikes:

  • The Long Path – Strenuous hikes along a portion of the Long Path from ROute 23 west in Windham to Huntersfield Road in Prattsville. Approximately 15 miles over 8 mountains.

Moderate Hikes:

  • Vroman’s Nose – The scenic gem of Schoharie County, this conspicuous promontory juts out over the pastoral Schoharie Creek Valley and provides fantastic views of some of New York’s best farmland. This preserve, maintained by the non-profit Vroman’s Nose Corporation, has dramatic ledges, an interesting geological history, and lies along the Long Path. Off NYS Rt. 30, near Middleburg.

Easy Hikes:

Primitive Camping:

  • Huntersfield Mountain Lean-to – The lean-to is located just below the summit of Huntersfield Mountain. The Long Path leads to the yellow-blazed NYSDEC trail that circles the summit and to the lean-to.
  • Eminence State Forest Complex – The lean-to within the 12,000-acre Eminence State Forest can be reached by taking Route 30 north to West Fulton Road. Head west to Rossman Hill Road, and west on Rossman Hill Road to Burnt Hill Road. Make a left turn to reach the Lean-to. The Long Path is nearby.

Cross-Country Skiing:

  • Catskill Scenic Trail from Roxbury to Bloomville in Delaware County. Multiple access points, so customize your ski trip.

Ice Skating

  • Badgley Park in the Village of Middleburgh
  • If your taste in rinks goes more to the indoor, well groomed rinks, Saugerties has what you’re looking for in the Kiwanis Arena

Flatwater Canoeing/Kayaking:

  • Blenheim-Gilboa Reservoirs – The lower reservoir, accessed from Mine Kill State Park is less restrictive to use than the upper reservoir. You can check regulations and access information here.
  • Pepacton Reservoir — newly opened by the NYC DEP, the Pepacton, along with the Schoharie, Neversink and Cannonsville reservoirs, are great places to do flat water paddling.   Serenity and wildlife abound on these reservoirs.  Boat rentals are available locally or, if you have your own boat it must be steam cleaned before bringing it to the launch site.   Read more about the reservoir boating program here, and the Pepacton specifically here.

River Canoeing/Kayaking:

  • East Branch of the Delaware River – The trip Halcottsville to Margaretville is about 5 miles. Below Margaretville you will enter the regulated waters of the NYC DEP, permit required. (See our page on DEP regulations.)  Boat rentals are available in Halcottsville and in Arkville as well as farther upstream in Roxbury. Check for stream conditions. Class I-II rapids.

Trout Fishing:

  • The East Branch of the Delaware River and some of its tributaries below Halcottsville have about 5 miles of public fishing rights.

Warm-water Fishing:

  • Lower Blenheim-Gilboa Reservoir. – see above

Mountain Biking:

  • Mine Kill State Park – 8 miles of trails.

Cycling:

  • Easy: Catskill Scenic Trail from Roxbury north and west to Bloomville.
  • Moderately easy: CR 36 in Roxbury is a lightly traveled, gently rolling road passing through scenic farmlands.

NORTHWESTERN Catskill Region
(Outside the Catskill Park)

Strenuous Hikes:

  • Bearpen and Vly Mountains are the only two of the 35 Catskill High Peaks that are located outside of the Park. They are usually climbed on the same hike.

Moderate Hikes:

  • Mount Utsayantha –  Climb to spectacular views on this 3214′ peak with a wooden fire tower.

Easy Hikes:

  • Emmons Pond Bog – A preserve owned and managed by The Nature Conservancy, with a hiking trail in easy walking distance from the road. Approach through a meadow with many wildflowers, then walk through the shrubby edge of the pond before stepping out onto a short boardwalk through the bog mat that surrounds the pond. See pitcher plants and other bog vegetation.
  • The history of the pond and bog date back 11,000 years when the retreat of the last glacier left a drepression which was soon filled with water. Sphagnum moss and other bog plants grew in the shallow water around the edge of the pond. Plant materials broke down slowly because of the acidity and low temperature of the water. As a result, the plant materials accumulated to form a floating doughnut-shaped mat around the pond. Beavers dammed the outlet stream in the late 1970s, so the bog mat is now ringed with water.
  • In the beginning of the trail there is a sign-in box and interpretive signs. The trail is easy and is marked with orange markers and is 1.4 mi long, circles the pond in a counter-clockwise direction. Southside Drive, 4 miles southeast of Oneonta in the Town of Davenport.
  • Catskill Scenic Rail Trail – The scenic rolling hills and rich agricultural lands of the Delaware River Valley will surround you as you walk or bike on this gentle-grade path. Choose a stretch from the 20 miles of rail trail between Bloomville and Grand Gorge, or try out the newly completed 5.5-mile section from Grand Gorge to Roxbury.

Primitive Camping:

Cross-Country Skiing:

  • Catskill Scenic Trail – see above

Flatwater Canoeing/Kayaking:

  • Schoharie Reservoir – One of the four NYC reservoirs open for recreational boating. is a great places to do flat water paddling.   Serenity and wildlife abound on these reservoirs.  Boat rentals are available locally or, if you have your own boat it must be steam cleaned before bringing it to the launch site.   Read more about the reservoir boating program here, and the Schoharie specifically here, including information on rentals and steam cleaning vendors.
  • Susquehanna River – between Oneonta and Cooperstown, the Susquehanna is a wide lazy river, perfect for a relaxing day in your canoe, kayak or maybe even a stand up paddleboard.   Boat rentals and other info available in Portlandville.

River Canoeing/Kayaking:

  • West Branch Delaware River – Spring rains and snow-melt make for a fun run on this meandering river through the beautiful rolling hills of Delaware County. Hold on tight to your paddle through the quick bends, and share the long flats with kingfishers, mergansers, herons, osprey, and bald eagles. A classic trip is from Bloomville or Delhi to Hamden. Put in at public bridges. River can be too low to float during drought months. Canoe rental available in Walton and the 18 mile trip from Delhi has Class I-II rapids. Oh, and don’t forget to buy some local maple syrup!

Trout Fishing:

  • West Branch Delaware River – Good fishing in both the farm country of the upper West Branch, and the tailwater river below the Cannonsville Reservoir. River below Deposit, and down into Main Stem of the Delaware below Hancock is one of the few places in the east where you can hire a guide to take you in a drift boat. Lots of public access points. The Delaware system is noted for its wild rainbows.

Warm-water Fishing:

Mountain Biking:

  • Ski Plattekill – This ski area offers fast action on the downhill slopes; serviced with chair lifts. Check their web site for rates and various events and competitions.

Cycling:

  • Catskill Scenic Rail Trail – see above

SOUTHEASTERN Catskill Region
(Outside the Catskill Park)

Strenuous Hikes:

Moderate Hikes:

  • Minnewaska State Park Preserve – Loop hike from Lake Minnewaska south to Gertrude’s Nose then north to Millbrook Mountain and back to the start. Stunning open views, white cliffs, dwarf pines and wild blueberries in season.

Easy Hikes:

  • Mohonk Preserve Carriage Trails – Take a stroll along the under-cliff or over-cliff carriage trails in the Trapps section of the beautiful Shawangunk Ridge. Enjoy the mountain laurel when it’s in bloomin spring, pick blueberries when they’re ripe in fall, and watch rock-climbers whenever the rocks are dry. Mohonk Preserve day pass or season pass required.

Primitive Camping:

Cross-Country Skiing:

  • Mohonk Preserve – see above
  • Minnewaska State Park and Preserve – Extensive network of groomed trails.

Ice Skating

Flatwater Canoeing/Kayaking:

  • Bashakill Wetland – A very unique and important wetland, the Bashakill is a part of a large protected area and tributary of the Nevesink River. The wetland is nestled between the Shawangunk Ridge and the Neversink Highlands, and offers a beautiful meandering paddling opportunity. Check with the non-profit Bashakill Area Association for guided outings led by professional botanists and other nature enthusiasts.

Flatwater Canoeing/Kayaking:

  • Wallkill River – Gentle north flowing river. Gardiner north to New Paltz and on to Sturgeon Pool near Rosendale and just south of the confluence with the Rondout Creek.
  • Neversink Reservoir — newly opened by the NYC DEP, the Neversink , along with the Schoharie, Pepacton and Cannonsville reservoirs, are great places to do flat water paddling.   Serenity and wildlife abound on these reservoirs.  Boat rentals are available locally or, if you have your own boat it must be steam cleaned before bringing it to the launch site.   Read more about the reservoir boating program here, and the Neversink specifically hereincluding information on rentals and steam cleaning vendors.

Trout Fishing:

  • Rondout Creek (upper) – Sections of the Rondout Creek below the Rondout Reservoir and down through Ellenville are stocked each year and generally remain cold enough to support trout. Temperatures begin to rise downstream of Ellenville.

Warm-water Fishing:

  • Rondout Creek (lower) – The flat-water sections of the Rondout, upstream of High Falls, make for great places to try your hand at largemouth bass, crappies, and sunfish.

Mountain Biking:

  • Vernooy State Forest – A recent addition to the State’s land-holdings, the Vernooey State Forest outside of Ellenville is a great connector between the Catskills and Shawangunks. Several dirt roads make for relaxing mountain bikes rides with little or no other traffic.
  • Lippman Park in Wawarsing. Built and maintained by enthusiasts.

Cycling:

  • Wallkill Valley Rail Trail – Gentle-grade trail awaits those want to embark on a day-trip between Kingston and Gardiner. 24 miles of completed rail trail in all. Multiple access points. Nearby bike shops in Gardiner, New Paltz and Rosendale.
  • Bonus: The recently opened section north of Rosendale crosses the 150′ high Rosendale Trestle and passes through the historic Rosendale Cement mining operations and factory ruins.
  • Minnewaska State Park Preserve – miles of carriage roads.
  • Bonus: Marvel at Awosting Falls near the park entrance and then ride out to Lake Awosting for a swim.

SOUTHWESTERN Catskill Region
(Outside the Catskill Park)

Strenuous Hikes:

  • Neversink Unique Area – Explore a secret treasure of the Catskill region – the Neversink Gorge. The Neversink is a wild and beautiful river, and here it flows through an out-of-the-way valley, over waterfalls and through thick forests. Trails of 1 to 3 miles one-way lead to the river, and then bush-whacking can be the best way to truly explore the river’s secrets.

Moderate Hikes:

  • O & W Rail Trail – Two completed sections, one from Hurleyville to South Fallsburg, and one from Woodridge to Mountaindale, offer a relaxing stroll or bike ride.
  • Rock Rift Fire Tower Trail  –   A brand new rail trail added to the Fingerlakes Trail system, alongside the Cannonsville Reservoir — Click here for full details and maps

Easy Hikes:

  • Crystal Lake Loop Trail – A relaxing loop hike around a beautiful hidden lake.
  • Rock Rift Rail Trail  7.8 miles.  – A brand new rail trail added to the Fingerlakes Trail system, alongside the Cannonsville Reservoir — Click here for full details and maps

Primitive Camping:

Cross-Country Skiing:

  • O & W Rail Trail – see above

Ice Skating:

  • Hodges Pond, Oneonta — ice conditions can be checked by calling 607-432-7997

Flatwater Canoeing/Kayaking:

  • Crystal Lake in the Crystal Lake Wild Forest – A 32 acre lake with a boat launch and a hiking trail.
  • Cannonsville Reservoir — the first reservoir opened to recreational boating by the NYC DEP, the Cannonsville , along with the Schoharie, Pepacton and Neverskink reservoirs, are great places to do flat water paddling.  Electric trolling motors are also allowed on only this reservoir.    Serenity and wildlife abound on these reservoirs.  Boat rentals are available locally or, if you have your own boat it must be steam cleaned before bringing it to the launch site.   Read more about the reservoir boating program here, and the Cannonsville specifically here, including information on rentals and steam cleaning vendors.

River Canoeing/Kayaking:

  • Delaware River – Designated a National Scenic and Recreational River, the Delaware is a classic float trip. Start in Hancock or any number of other public access points and flat as little as one or two miles, or as many as 10, 20, 50, or even 100 or more. The main-stem Delaware is the largest un-dammed river in the east, and boasts a healthy population of bald eagles and many game-fish species. Private outfitters rent canoes and kayaks, and run campgrounds and guided trips. Keep your eyes out for bald eagles! Hancock to Port Jervis has some Class I-II rapids.

Trout Fishing:

  • Delaware River – The main-stem Delaware is the largest un-dammed river in the east, and supports a healthy population of naturally spawning brown, rainbow, and brook trout. One of the few good trout rivers in the east that can be floated in a rowboat or driftboat. Several fly shops and professional guides available in the area. The big river can be intimidating, so don’t hesitate to seek professional advice on the best fishing tactics.

Warm-water Fishing:

  • Delaware River – When the water temperatures rise in the downstream portions of the Delaware, many fisherman turn to black bass, walleye, and shad.

Mountain Biking:

  • Walnut Mountain Park is a town owned park located in Liberty and consists of 265 acres. On the second highest mountain in Sullivan County, it has trails of varied difficulty. Open May 1 through September 30.

Cycling:

Take a Survey to Help Improve Catskills Recreation

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We are writing to ask you to take a survey about your experiences of the Catskills. Whether you have visited, have considered visiting, or live here full or part time, your responses can help inform the work being done in the Catskills to improve experiences for all, including trip planning and the usage of services and recreational assets.

This survey was initiated by the Catskill Park Coalition, of which the Catskill Mountain Club is a founding member. It is being used to create a Comprehensive Recreation Plan for the Greater Catskill Region. Administered by the Catskill Watershed Corporation, the plan will take an integrated look at the Catskill region’s recreational assets and the economic impacts of those assets.

The CMC believes that this study is vital to the continued improvement of the Catskill Park and region as a place for recreation, a destination for recreational tourism and as an invaluable conserved natural area.

We appreciate your support.

To begin, click here for the survey.

 

 

 

 

Read All About It in the The CMC’s Winter 2018 Newsletter

CMCpatchStuckis

Yours free with membership. Or buy it for $5.

Winter 2018 Newsletter

Have you come home from a winter hike to find that a tick has attached itself to you!? Maybe you’ve been out on a little adventure on the trails and found yourself on your butt more times than you care to remember. Read our review of traction devices and you’ll soon be prepared for another, safer outing. These articles and much more are yours to read by clicking here. Subscribe to our mailing list to get future newsletters and CMC updates in your mailbox automatically. Just give us your name, email address and mailing address and you’ll be kept informed about CMC happenings. We promise not to flood your inbox.

Of course, our favorite option would be that you become a CMC member. Our modest membership dues are what we rely on to make the wheels go ’round. And you get some nice perks with your annual membership. Check it out. Thanks.

Saturday, March 31, 8:00 AM | Woodhull Mountain & Van Wyck Mountain Hike

Van Wyck, Woodhull, Red Hill from Slide

Van Wyck, Woodhull, Red Hill from Slide

This bushwhack will visit two Catskill Hundred Highest peaks, Woodhull & Van Wyck Mountains. We’ll travel at a slow to moderate pace. There will be excellent views of several nearby high peaks, and we’ll visit two plane crash sites.

 

Event Duration:  7 miles, 5 hours

Level of Difficulty: Difficult — Bushwhack

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Sunday, March 11, 9:00 AM | Family Friendly Hike on the Palmer Hill Trail

EaglefromPalmerHill_byBillP_MG_2257

Photo courtesy of Bill Palmer

Join NYSDEC Licensed Guide Will Soter for this family friendly hike along the Palmer Hill Trail. This is the first of a series of hikes, in which Will hopes to highlight some of his favorite family friendly adventures. Will would also like to showcase the great efforts of the Catskill Mountain Club, that has worked to open recreational access in the Catskills. The Palmer Hill Trail is the third trail created by the Catskill Mountain Club, and the second in partnership with the NYC DEP. The Catskill Mountain Club created this trail from design to construction, taking great care to highlight the splendid views for most of its 3.7 mile length.

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Saturday, March 31, 10 AM | Huckleberry Loop Trail

DSC03459fromLauraFrom the trailhead on Hill Road in Margaretville, we will have a nice spring walk to the lookout over the reservoir. On the way we will pass a bog which is only 700+ years old. At the lookout, you can see the way we hiked up the hill and the Pepacton Reservoir in the distance.

Event Duration:  6.6 miles, 5.25 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Moderate-Difficult

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Catskills All Trails Challenge: De-listing the Jockey Hill Trails

After careful consideration, the CMC has decided to de-list the Jockey Hill Trails as a hike required to qualify for the Catskills All Trails Challenge certificate of completion.

Like the Elm Ridge trails in Greene County, which were never listed as required hikes, Jockey Hill trails are multi-purpose and are designed with the needs of mountain biking users in mind. The Department of Environmental Conservation has indicated that the trail system at Jockey Hill will be expanded to serve those needs. These additions further change the hiking experience through the design of trails that form multiple loops. Similar improvements have been made at Elm Ridge, and the CMC applauds the decision of the DEC to expand mountain biking opportunities in the Catskill Park. However, such trails are not conducive to a satisfying hiking experience.

To those who have already hiked Jockey Hill in its current configuration, we say congratulations. We hope you enjoyed your explorations there. Feedback from some CATs hikers, along with consultation with the DEC about the expanded system have informed our decision. Of course, any hiker is more than welcome to explore both Jockey Hill and Elm Ridge. Until the current supply of CATs Challenge tee shirts runs out, Jockey Hill will continue to be listed on the shirt. It will be removed from the published list of required hikes.

As this development illustrates, the trail system in the Catskill Park in dynamic. New trails are sometimes added and old trails are sometimes rerouted or abandoned. We appreciate input from our members and friends and look forward to hearing from you as you continue the quest. Thanks for participating and for spreading the word about the Catskills All Trails Challenge and the wonderful trails and features that are discovered with each hike!

Saturday, March 17, 11:00 AM | Kelly Hollow Hike

beaverDamSectionIMG_2721Join us on this nice loop hike past a huge spruce plantation, waterfalls and out to an old beaver pond.  We’ll stop at the adjacent lean-to for lunch.

Event Duration:  4 miles, 2.25 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Moderate

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Catskill Park Day 2018: A Call to Action

CPC graphic

 

In only a few days the CMC and its Catskill Park Coalition partners will go to Albany for our annual Catskill Park Day. We’ll meet with our elected representatives, including the Governor and members of the legislature, to press for action on the policy priorities we have identified for 2018.

If you are not able to travel with us to Albany for Catskill Park Day, there’s a way to speak up and speak out right from the comfort of your home or office. By raising your voice, you amplify our message and add power to its effectiveness.

You can either send Governor Cuomo a brief letter of support for the priorities of the Catskill Mountain Club and its Catskill Park Coalition partners, or you can call the Governor’s office and give a brief message of support.

Catskill Park Coalition - Budget Priorities 2018 (Final)

Click to enlarge

Below are the specific requests made by the CPC for 2018. Simply glance at them, pick one or two that resonates with you and place your call telling the assistant who answers what you would like the Governor to support.

If you prefer to write a note, we have provided a link to the form used by the Governor’s office. You can simply copy and paste the message we have written below or edit it to suit your preferences.

We have had good results over the past several years and anticipate continued success with support from folks like you who love the Catskills and care about its future.

Thank you for your efforts!

Phone number of the Governor’s office: (518) 474-8390   Office hours: 9:00am to 5:00pm

Link to the Governor’s email system: https://www.governor.ny.gov/content/governor-contact-form

Sample letter:

Dear Governor Cuomo,

I am writing today to respectfully ask that you give your support to the priorities for the Catskill Park and region as expressed by the Catskill Mountain Club and its fellow members of the Catskill Park Coalition.

The Catskill Park is one of our nation’s great natural assets, encompassing hundreds of thousands of acres of pristine wilderness and sparkling clean waters. It is home to huge communities of rare wildlife and to one of the most diverse forests in the world. And it is one of New York’s greatest outdoor recreational areas, along with the Adirondack Park.

Please support the continuing improvements to the Catskills environment and Park infrastructure that allow members of the public to experience the great outdoors in all its glory in a way that is both safe and sustainable.

Sincerely,

Saturday, March 3, 8:30 AM | Hunter Mountain Fire Tower Snowshoe

Hunter Mtn.

Hunter Mtn.

Snowshoe at a slow to moderate pace to Southwest Hunter and Hunter Mountains. Excellent views from the Fire Tower, and Geiger Point. For those working on the Catskill All Trails Challenge, we’ll complete the Spruceton and Hunter Mountain trails, and will cover a part of the Devil’s Path. We’ll reach Southwest Hunter via a 3/4 mile unmarked trail off of the Devil’s Path. After the hike, a mile down the road on our way home, we can warm up by the fire at the West Kill Brewing tap room.

Event Duration:  10 miles, 8 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Difficult
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Saturday, February 17, 10 AM | Alder Lake to Beaver Meadow

IMG_3739We will meet at the entrance to Alder Lake and hike around Alder Lake and over a couple of hills to Beaver Meadow lean-to. It is a nice snowshoe if snow permits. The beavers are back in Alder Lake and will by their lodge on the way to the Lean-to.

Event Duration:  7 miles, 4.25 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Moderate

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Sunday, March 4, 9:30 AM | Balsam Lake Mountain

BLM winterThis great hike will begin on Mill Brook Rd. and follow the Dry Brook Ridge Trail to the BLM summit with its iconic fire tower. The hike will continue, completing the loop and returning to the starting point. Expect rewarding views and hope for a good base to permit snowshoeing.

Event Duration:  7 miles, 6 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Moderate-Difficult

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Saturday, February 10, 8 AM | Balsam & Eagle Hike

IMG_2066Snowshoe hike to two 3500 peaks, Balsam & Eagle, at a slow to moderate pace. There will be a nice view from the approach to Balsam Mountain. For those working on the Catskill All Trails Challenge, this hike will complete the Seager – Big Indian trail, and the Mine Hollow trail; and will cover part of the Pine Hill – West Branch trail, and a very small part of the Oliverea – Mapledale trail.

Event Duration: 8.6 miles, 7 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Moderate-Difficult Continue reading

Winter Walk on the U&D RR Trail in Pine Hill | Wednesday, February 28, 11:30am

Meet at the Pine Hill Community Center for a short winter walk or snowshoe on the nearby rail trail.
Snowshoes and/or traction devices and warm layers of clothing required for the walk.
Repeats on Wednesdays January and February 2018

Event Duration:  2.5 miles, 1.5 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Easy-Moderate

Leader(s):  Pamela Martin

Bring:  Warm clothing in non-cotton layers, snowshoes and/or Microspikes, sturdy hiking boots

Registration:  Register by contacting the leader. See below.

Group size is limited to 12, so register early.

Dogs allowed:  No

Additional Information: The hike will be preceeded by an optional yoga class from 10-11 am. The fee for the class is $10.  The hike is free.

Questions about this event can be directed to:  pamelamartininc@gmail.com

Driving Directions:  Pine Hill is just off Route 28,  34 miles west of Kingston, 10 miles east of Margaretville
The Pine Hill Community Center is located in the middle of Main Street  at 287 Main Street.

Winter Walk on the U&D RR Trail in Pine Hill | Wednesday, February 21, 11:30am

Meet at the Pine Hill Community Center for a short winter walk or snowshoe on the nearby rail trail.
Snowshoes and/or traction devices and warm layers of clothing required for the walk.
Repeats on Wednesdays January and February 2018

Event Duration:  2.5 miles, 1.5 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Easy-Moderate

Leader(s):  Pamela Martin

Bring:  Warm clothing in non-cotton layers, snowshoes and/or Microspikes, sturdy hiking boots

Registration:  Register by contacting the leader. See below.

Group size is limited to 12, so register early.

Dogs allowed:  No

Additional Information: The hike will be preceeded by an optional yoga class from 10-11 am. The fee for the class is $10.  The hike is free.

Questions about this event can be directed to:  pamelamartininc@gmail.com

Driving Directions:  Pine Hill is just off Route 28,  34 miles west of Kingston, 10 miles east of Margaretville
The Pine Hill Community Center is located in the middle of Main Street  at 287 Main Street.

Winter Walk on the U&D RR Trail in Pine Hill | Wednesday, February 14, 11:30am

Meet at the Pine Hill Community Center for a short winter walk or snowshoe on the nearby rail trail.
Snowshoes and/or traction devices and warm layers of clothing required for the walk.
Repeats on Wednesdays January and February 2018

Event Duration:  2.5 miles, 1.5 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Easy-Moderate

Leader(s):  Pamela Martin

Bring:  Warm clothing in non-cotton layers, snowshoes and/or Microspikes, sturdy hiking boots

Registration:  Register by contacting the leader. See below.

Group size is limited to 12, so register early.

Dogs allowed:  No

Additional Information: The hike will be preceeded by an optional yoga class from 10-11 am. The fee for the class is $10.  The hike is free.

Questions about this event can be directed to:  pamelamartininc@gmail.com

Driving Directions:  Pine Hill is just off Route 28,  34 miles west of Kingston, 10 miles east of Margaretville
The Pine Hill Community Center is located in the middle of Main Street  at 287 Main Street.

Winter Walk on the U&D RR Trail in Pine Hill | Wednesday, February 7, 11:30am

Meet at the Pine Hill Community Center for a short winter walk or snowshoe on the nearby rail trail.
Snowshoes and/or traction devices and warm layers of clothing required for the walk.
Repeats on Wednesdays January and February 2018

Event Duration:  2.5 miles, 1.5 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Easy-Moderate

Leader(s):  Pamela Martin

Bring:  Warm clothing in non-cotton layers, snowshoes and/or Microspikes, sturdy hiking boots

Registration:  Register by contacting the leader. See below.

Group size is limited to 12, so register early.

Dogs allowed:  No

Additional Information: The hike will be preceeded by an optional yoga class from 10-11 am. The fee for the class is $10.  The hike is free.

Questions about this event can be directed to:  pamelamartininc@gmail.com

Driving Directions:  Pine Hill is just off Route 28,  34 miles west of Kingston, 10 miles east of Margaretville
The Pine Hill Community Center is located in the middle of Main Street  at 287 Main Street.

Winter Walk on the U&D RR Trail in Pine Hill | Wednesday, January 31, 11:30am

Meet at the Pine Hill Community Center for a short winter walk or snowshoe on the nearby rail trail.
Snowshoes and/or traction devices and warm layers of clothing required for the walk.
Repeats on Wednesdays January and February 2018

Event Duration:  2.5 miles, 1.5 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Easy-Moderate

Leader(s):  Pamela Martin

Bring:  Warm clothing in non-cotton layers, snowshoes and/or Microspikes, sturdy hiking boots

Registration:  Register by contacting the leader. See below.

Group size is limited to 12, so register early.

Dogs allowed:  No

Additional Information: The hike will be preceeded by an optional yoga class from 10-11 am. The fee for the class is $10.  The hike is free.

Questions about this event can be directed to:  pamelamartininc@gmail.com

Driving Directions:  Pine Hill is just off Route 28,  34 miles west of Kingston, 10 miles east of Margaretville
The Pine Hill Community Center is located in the middle of Main Street  at 287 Main Street.

Winter Walk on the U&D RR Trail in Pine Hill | Wednesday, January 24, 11:30am

Meet at the Pine Hill Community Center for a short winter walk or snowshoe on the nearby rail trail.
Snowshoes and/or traction devices and warm layers of clothing required for the walk.
Repeats on Wednesdays January and February 2018

Event Duration:  2.5 miles, 1.5 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Easy-Moderate

Leader(s):  Pamela Martin

Bring:  Warm clothing in non-cotton layers, snowshoes and/or Microspikes, sturdy hiking boots

Registration:  Register by contacting the leader. See below.

Group size is limited to 12, so register early.

Dogs allowed:  No

Additional Information: The hike will be preceeded by an optional yoga class from 10-11 am. The fee for the class is $10.  The hike is free.

Questions about this event can be directed to:  pamelamartininc@gmail.com

Driving Directions:  Pine Hill is just off Route 28,  34 miles west of Kingston, 10 miles east of Margaretville
The Pine Hill Community Center is located in the middle of Main Street  at 287 Main Street.

Winter Walk on the U&D RR Trail in Pine Hill | Wednesday, January 17, 11:30am

Meet at the Pine Hill Community Center for a short winter walk or snowshoe on the nearby rail trail.
Snowshoes and/or traction devices and warm layers of clothing required for the walk.
Repeats on Wednesdays January and February 2018

Event Duration:  2.5 miles, 1.5 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Easy-Moderate

Leader(s):  Pamela Martin

Bring:  Warm clothing in non-cotton layers, snowshoes and/or Microspikes, sturdy hiking boots

Registration:  Register by contacting the leader. See below.

Group size is limited to 12, so register early.

Dogs allowed:  No

Additional Information: The hike will be preceeded by an optional yoga class from 10-11 am. The fee for the class is $10.  The hike is free.

Questions about this event can be directed to:  pamelamartininc@gmail.com

Driving Directions:  Pine Hill is just off Route 28,  34 miles west of Kingston, 10 miles east of Margaretville
The Pine Hill Community Center is located in the middle of Main Street  at 287 Main Street.

Winter Walk on the U&D RR Trail in Pine Hill | Wednesday, January 10, 11:30am

This event repeats every Wednesday through February, 2018.

Meet at the Pine Hill Community Center for a short winter walk or snowshoe on the nearby rail trail.
Snowshoes and/or traction devices and warm layers of clothing required for the walk.
Repeats on Wednesdays January and February 2018

Event Duration:  2.5 miles, 1.5 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Easy-Moderate Continue reading

Overlook Mountain: New Parking Area and Trail Will Relieve a Big Problem

Overlook Mountain new parking & trailsDecember 19, 2017

The DEC opened the new Meads Meadow Trailhead parking area on McDaniel Rd. today. A new trail system explores the Magic Meadow parcel, and the new connector trail leads to the existing trail to the summit and fire tower.

Severe overuse has long plagued hikers with parking problems that resulted in dangerous conditions on the road for hikers and drivers alike. A downloadable map is available on the CMC website here: Overlook Mountain new parking & trails.

calender sandbox

Palmer Hill view by Bill Palmer_MG_0139

                    Photo courtesy of Bill Palmer – Palmer Hill Photography

January 2018

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

1 New Year’s Day

6:30 AM – Hike Vroman’s Nose – CANCELED

12:30 PM – Hike to Split Rock

2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13

10:00 AM Hike Big Pond to Alder Lake

14 15 M L King Day
16  17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31

2018 Calendar Template © calendarlabs.com

Continue reading

Big Pond to Alder Lake Hike | Sunday, January 28, 10 am

IMG_4978Join us for what will hopefully be a snowshoe hike between Big Pond and Alder Lake and return. It is a nice walk over several rolling hills and past an old homestead.

Event Duration:  7 miles, 4.25 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Moderate Continue reading

New: Catskills Trail Conditions Reports from the Catskill Interpretive Center

The Catskill Interpretive Center has added a very valuable service for visitors who hike in the Catskills. The weekly updated trail condition reports offer vital news about all sorts of hazards and problems that hikers might encounter. Things like washouts, trail obstructions, weather related conditions and other related info can be found in one convenient spot. Check out the CMC Facebook page on Thursdays for a link to the new reports, or visit the Catskill Interpretive Center’s trail conditions webpage.

The CMC is an operating partner of the Catskill Interpretive Center. To support out work there, please consider donating to or joining the CMC. Thank you.

CANCELLED – Vroman’s Nose First Day Hike | Monday, January 1, 2018, 6:30 a.m.

NOTE: This hike was cancelled due to weather conditions.

Join us for New York 1st Day Hike at Sun Rise over Schoharie Valley on the First morning of the New Year. It is an enjoyable climb up the top and we will spend at least an hour on top, dress warm.IMG_2639

Event Duration:  1.9 miles, 2:20 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Moderate Continue reading

Hike to Split Rock via Mary Smith Trail | Monday, January 1 – POSTPONED due to Weather

IMG_4700 Split RockRick Roberts will lead a hike to Split Rock along the Finger Lakes Trail section comprising the Mary Smith Trail.  This hike is relatively easy with only one steep section as we near the Split Rock overlook.  The hike will start at the Mary Smith trailhead on Holliday/Berry Brook Rd. at approximately 12:30 pm. This hike is part of a nationwide effort aimed at beginning hikers call “FIRST DAY HIKES”.  For more FIRST DAY hikes go to www.parks.ny.gov.

Event Duration:  4 miles, 3 hours

Level of Difficulty: Moderate Continue reading

Sunday, March 26, 10 AM | Late Winter Tree ID Hike in Stone Ridge

IMG_0755-2Erwin Karl of CMC will join Mid Hudson Mycological Association and member Mira Fink as we embark on a late-winter tree identification hike along the O & W Rail Trail in Stone Ridge. The task of identifying trees may be more challenging before leaf-out, but there are many clues based on bark, shape, location and leaf litter, to name a few. There is a good chance we will also see some bracket or crust fungi, as well as remnants of annual plants. Continue reading

Saturday, March 25, 10:00 AM | Hike to Trout Pond from Campbell Brook Rd.

IMG_0843Please join me for a nice snowshoe, hopefully.  Bring other traction footwear appropriate for the conditions and weather. We will start from the Parking Area on Campbell Brook Rd.. It is nice moderate hike over a couple of rolling hills down to the lean-to at Trout Pond (Cable Lake). From there we can continue on for 1.4 miles to Russell Brook Falls. Continue reading

We have a new “Wildflowers of the Catskills” page!

Visit our newly expanded page covering Wildflowers of the Catskills.

We now list over 130 species and cover the seasons from early spring through fall. With Spring arriving and a new year of blooms on the way, what better way to enjoy them than to get prepared by familiarizing yourself with them? Our page is set up for quick reference and it focusses on the flowers you will see right here in the Catskills! Check it out.

Saturday, June 3 | Help Fight New York’s Battle Against Invasive Species

asian longhorned beetle

Asian Long Horned Beetle

The New York Natural Heritage Program has announced its 2017 schedule of training sessions for the iMapInvasives project. You can help fight invasive species issues around the state by identifying the locations and status of incidents of many types of invasives that threaten New York’s naturally occurring species and can cause problems such as erosion, massive mortality of trees, navigation difficulties in waterways and recreational access problems.  So grab your smartphone or gps unit and pitch in.

Sessions are scheduled throughout the state, including here in the Catskills. Check it out.

2017 iMapInvasives Announcement and Schedule

Saturday, February 11, 10:00 AM | Bramley Mountain Trails

IMG_3767Join the Catskill Mountain Club on a hike on the recently opened Bramley Mountain Trail. We have a few markers and a sign to put up and thought we’d make a fun hike out of it.  We’ll visit the 2817’ summit with its site of a former fire tower, a beautiful abandoned bluestone quarry, and the impressive cliffs and caves that lie between. We’ll hike about .9 miles to the quarry on a woods road with little elevation gain. After the quarry, we’ll continue on the steeper trail that ascends about 1.2 miles through mixed hardwoods while passing stone walls and many impressive rock outcroppings and cliffs, some with caves. The hike will descend the mountain on the Summit Trail, a 1.8 mile long direct hike on old woods roads, with its views to the west and to the southern high peaks and Mount Pisgah.  It has some steep pitches alternating with long gentle climbs. This route (Quarry Trail up, Summit Trail down) offers the best views of all the sights this trail has to offer.

The Bramley Mountain Trail is the fifth addition to the hiking options in the Catskills designed and built by the Catskill Mountain Club. It is located on a NYC DEP parcel in the Towns of Delhi and Bovina, totaling about 4 miles in length. Continue reading

Saturday, March 18, 9:00 AM | Winter Hike on Wittenberg from Woodland Valley

Hike to Mt. Wittenberg (3780 ft.), starting in Woodland Valley. Enjoy great view from the top looking down the Esopus Creek all the way to Ashokan Reservoir. If time allows, we will proceed to Mt Cornell (3680 ft.). Either way we return on the same trail to Woodland Valley. Warm clothing and micro spikes or crampons are highly recommended. It is a tough climb for small dogs so if you bring one keep this in mind.

Pre-registration required by Feb. 12. Group size is limited. Contact Rick Roberts at hikerrick2000@yahoo.com or (607) 746-9694.

This is a strenuous hike. Bring lunch and snacks. Bring snowshoes and microspikes or other traction footwear. Full crampons may be desired on certain steep sectionsIMG_0644z. Poles will be helpful.

Well behaved dogs are allowed. Due to the hike’s difficulty, bringing small dogs is not recommended.

 

Directions: NYS Rte. 28 to Phoenicia Village. Use High St. from the south side of the Bridge St. Bridge. (The Woodland Valley Bridge is closed.) Follow it west about 1 mile to Woodland Valley Rd. and then stay left (south) about 6 miles to the DEC campground. Park in the parking area (no fees during off season).

Saturday, February 18, 12:00 PM | Hike on Rail Bed in Pine Hill to Cathedral Glen and Belleayre Lake

IMG_0747 - Phyllotopsis nidulans EK

Join CMC board member Erwin Karl to explore the old rail bed through Pine Hill.  There is little change in elevation making the hike moderately easy even if recent snows necessitate use of snowshoes. In addition to hiking/snowshoeing, we will stop to ID and discuss some of the edible and medicinal fungi and plants which can be found throughout the year in the forests of the Catskills. Continue reading