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Welcome to the Catskill Mountain Club

Looking up Kaaterskill Clove from Palenville Overlook with Indian Head in the foreground.

Founded in 2004, the year of the 100th Anniversary of the Catskill Park, the CMC has dedicated itself to providing a broad range of non-motorized outdoor recreational activities to its members, to residents and to visitors in the Catskills. Whether you hike, camp, kayak, canoe, snowshoe, ski, or cycle, the CMC offers activities to meet your interests.

 

 

 

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CMC EVENTS CALENDAR

Palmer Hill view by Bill Palmer_MG_0139

                    Photo courtesy of Bill Palmer – Palmer Hill Photography

May 2018

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

1 2 3 4 5

8:00 AM

Hiking the Blue Lines: An Exploration of Catskill Streams – Bear Hole Brook to Van Wyck Mountain

6

POSTPONED to May 13th

11:00 AM

Annual Ephemeral Wildflower Hike @ Kelly Hollow

7 8 9 10

10:00 AM

Hike to Split Rock

11 12

POSTPONED

8:00 AM

Hiking the Bluelines: An Exploration of Catskill Streams – Hunter Brook or West Kill to Hunter Mtn.

13 Mother’s Day

10:30 AM

Rochester Hollow Hike

14 15 16  Ramadan 17

10:00 AM

Hike the Shavertown Trail

18 19

Rescheduled to June 24

8:30 AM Escarpment Trail at Kaaterskill Clove and Hardytown LP Traverse

20 21 22 23 24 25 26

8:00 AM

Ashokan High Point & Little Rocky Hike

11:00 AM

Paddle the Pepacton

CatskillsTroutTalesCatskillMountainClub

27 28  Memorial Day 29 30 31

10:00 AM

Balsam Mountain from Rider Hollow

2018 Calendar Template © calendarlabs.com

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Guided Hike on the Trails at the CIC | Saturday, June 9, 10:30 AM

IMG_3954If you’re unfamiliar with the trails on the Catskill Interpretive Center grounds or are just looking for an opportunity to explore them more thoroughly, CMC Executive Director Wendell George will lead a hike on the entire system as part of the Get Outdoors Day events on June 9th.  Join us for a look at the CIC’s sculpture and interpretive trail, a short representative hike in the Catskill woods and a hike out to the Esopus Creek, a notable trout fishing stream which ffeds water into NYC’s Ashokan Reservoir.  Much of the hike is on ADA accessible trails.

Woodland Hike with Yoga: Kelly Hollow Beaver Pond | Wednesday, June 13, 12:00 PM

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Kelly Hollow pond and lean-to

A relaxed woodland hike with a short yoga session at the Beaver Pond on the beautiful Kelly Hollow Trail.

Event Duration:  3 miles, 3 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Easy-Moderate

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Balsam and Belleayre: From Mine Hollow to Lost Clove | Saturday, June 16, 8:30 AM

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Balsam and Belleayre from Slide

Truly this is when Belleayre and Balsam Mountain are the most lovely, as Spring turns to Summer here. The plant life and views are wonderful. Sometimes you get to see the shy animals and birds that live here, too, as we traverse from Mine Hollow across the mountain tops to descend on Lost Clove.

Event Duration:  8 miles, 7 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Difficult

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Landscaping with Non-Invasive Plants / iMapInvasives Training | Saturday, June 2, 9:30 AM

Learn about best choices for landscaping your yard without introducing invasive ornamentals.

The fight against invasive species in the Catskills and throughout New York is a high priority. the Catskill Regional Invasive Species Partnership is the local agency for this effort. If you would like to volunteer to help, you can get started by attending a CRISP iMapInvasives workshop at the Catskill Interpretive Center on June 2.

Become part of New York’s invasive species early detection network by learning how to use iMapInvasives, an online mapping system shared by citizen scientists, educators, and natural resource professionals. All interested groups are encouraged to help keep the map up-to-date and accurate by reporting invasive species locations and control efforts. You can even use your smartphone to report new findings. The NY Natural Heritage Program will offer free sessions throughout the state this spring, with beginner and advanced levels, plus identification sessions at some of the locations. Visit www.nyimapinvasives.org for schedule details and registration, and contact imapinvasives@nynhp.org with general questions.

We hope you wll get involved with this critical effort to protect our forests and native species.

CRISP logo

 

 

iMapInvasives is an online mapping tool that supports efforts to protect New York State from invasive species. Learn about the program and become trained to contribute data by attending an iMapInvasives training session!

When: June 2, 2018 10:00am – 2:00pm

Where: Catskill Interpretive Center 5096 Route 28

Mt. Tremper, NY 12457

Agenda:

9:30am‐10am – Gather and coffee
10:00am‐11:00 am‐ Alternatives to Ornamental Invasive Plants

11:00 am ‐ 12:00pm – Basic iMapInvasives and iMap Mobile app
12:00 pm ‐ 12:30 pm – Brown bag lunch
12:30 pm ‐ 2:00pm – Site visit and how to submit invasive species using the

Mobile App.
To Register: visit www.NYiMapInvasives.org

Questions? Contact:

imapinvasives@nynhp.org

The Invasive Species Database Program is supported by the NYS Environmental Protection Fund through a contract with the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation.

www.NYimapinvasives.org

National Trails Day Hike on Ticeteneyck Mountain | Saturday, June 2, 9:30 AM

Ticeteneyck Mountain

Ticeteneyck Mountain

The New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) will host a community hike to the summit of Ticeteneyck Mountain on June 2 to celebrate National Trails Day. Participants will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Catskill Interpretive Center, located at 5096 Route 28 in Mount Tremper.  Led by DEP and DEC staff, the CMC is happy to co-host this event.

 

 

Ticeteneyck Mountain

Ticeteneyck Mountain from Thomas Cole

Hikers will learn about the principles of Leave No Trace, the Catskill Park and Forest Preserve, and Ashokan Reservoir’s role in providing clean drinking water to New York City. Ticeteneyck Mountain is located in Ulster County along the town border of Olive and Woodstock. This moderate hike will comprise a 3.5-mile round trip. The hike follows old woods roads and ridgelines that open to spectacular views of the Catskill Mountains,Shawangunk Mountains and Ashokan Reservoir.

Because the event is limited to 15 people, participants must pre-register by clicking here or by visiting DEP’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/nycwatershed. Participants are also encouraged to bring water, snacks or lunch, and wear proper attire for hiking.

 

Thru Hike German Hollow and Dry Brook Ridge to Huckleberry Loop | Sunday, June 3, 8:30 AM

IMG_0065This traverse/shuttle will ascend up German Hollow with spring flowers to Dry Brook Ridge. We will check out the new shelter and go on to views on Dry Brook over the Pepacton. Then we will return north to the Huckleberry Loop Trail and descend to our parked cars.

Event Duration:  9.5 miles, 7.5 hours

Level of Difficulty: Difficult

Leaders:  Deanna Felicetta

Bring: good hiking shoes, lunch, snacks, bug spray, plenty to drink, map and compass (recommended),

Registration required by June 1st.  Register by contacting the leader. See below.

Group size is limited to 12, so register early.

Dogs allowed: Yes, only with permission of event leader. Bring a leash for when needed.

Additional Information: PLEASE contact leader and cancel if you are not able to come as others may
want to. Remember we hike together for safety and FUN!

Questions about this event can be directed to:  Deanna at felicetta.deanna@gmail.com or call 845-216 2021 and NO TEXTING PLEASE!  Leave name and number. Please contact leader if you need to cancel.

Driving Directions: From the intersection of SR 28/30 and Fair St. in Margaretville, take Fair St. south 0.2 miles tof Southside Rd. Go south 1.6 miles miles to Huckleberry Brook Spur Rd. Go 0.9 miles to the first parking area on Huckleberry Brook Spur Road, on the left.
Please arrive ahead as we will then shuttle to Arkville and Chris Long Road at German Hollow.
Hike map #142.

Ashokan High Point | Thursday, June 14, 10:00 AM

DCF 1.0

Ashokan Reservoir from Ashokan High Point

This is a fairly long lollypop hike (loop at the end of a stick) with great views of the Askokan Reservoir and the Burroughs Range. The hike passes the wreckage of small plane. Most of hike is relatively easy, but there are some steep pitches. The trail follows the Kanape Brook for more than half the hike.

Event Duration:  8.1 miles, 7 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Moderate-Difficult

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Balsam Mountain from Rider Hollow | Thursday, May 31, 10:00 AM

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Balsam Mountain Vista

With great rewards for the effort, this is one of the most representative hikes of the Catskills. The relatively short loop takes in lovely streams, waterfalls, huge hemlocks, some steep and rocky terrain, and a tremendous vista.

Event Duration:  5.1 miles, 5 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Moderate-Difficult

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Hike the Shavertown Trail | Thursday, May 17, 10:00 AM

WG_ShavertownPond-1024x768

Pond on Shavertown Trail

The Shavertown Trail begins with a moderately difficult climb to a woods road. From there it climbs gently to a lovely pond and beautiful views of the mountains over the Pepacton Reservoir. Beyond the pond is a moderately easy hike to a short loop ending, followed by the return hike.

This will be one of the last opportunities to hike the full trail until late this year due to a planned forestry project that will necessitate closing the trail above the pond for several months.

Event Duration:  5.3 miles,  4 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Moderate; 800′ elevation gain.

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Ashokan High Point & Little Rocky | Saturday, May 26, 8:00 AM

nathan high point 034

The Burroughs Range from Ashokan High Point

This hike combines a 9 mile trail loop to Ashokan High Point (3080 feet, Catskill Hundred Highest #83) with a 5+ mile bushwhack to Little Rocky (3015 feet, CHH #95) and a short bushwhack to Little Ashokan. If the weather is clear we’ll have great views of Ashokan Reservoir and several high peaks. We’ll visit the site of a WW II trainer crash. Our pace will be moderate, and we’ll have frequent, short water/snack breaks. This hike is listed as difficult because of its length (about 15 miles), and because of the the unpredictable nature of the bushwhack to Little Rocky.

Event Duration:  15 miles, 10 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Difficult  — Bushwhack

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Rochester Hollow Hike | Sunday, May 13, 10:30 AM

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

Rochester Hollow Trail

Historic Rochester Hollow follows a stream for awhile on an old woods road towards the former site of an estate. Along the way is a memorial plaque to Catskills’ native son, naturalist and widely read author John Burroughs.

Event Duration:  4 miles, 3 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Moderate

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Hike the Palmer Hill Trail | Thursday, April 26, 10:00 AM

IMG_2773smallSize

Palmer Hill

Get out for an early Spring hike on the Palmer Hill Trails. The always great views, including to the western high peaks, will be even better with the leaves off the trees.

Event Duration:  4 miles, 3 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Easy-Moderate

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Escarpment Trail at Kaaterskill Clove and Hardytown LP Traverse | Sunday, June 24, 8:30 AM

IMG_2761rhunterInTheDistance

This hike follows the ESCARPMENT above Kaaterskill Clove, with views across the clove and out to the Hudson River Valley. We’ll follow the Harding Road Trail down the slopes of South Mountain.

Do join us for a lovely hike full of fabulous views and wildflowers! Hike about 7.2 miles over steep terrain with many views and scrambles. The yellow marked White Road sectionwill be included for All Trails Challenge hikers. See NYNJTC map #141 map and inset.

Event Duration:  7.2 miles, 6-7 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Moderate-Difficult

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Andes Rail Trail Gets Some Big Improvements

April 10, 2018

IMG_5326Parking has always been a bit tricky for visitors to the Andes Rail Trail and Bullet Hole Spur, but no longer. There has been a great improvement to the parking situation thanks to the Town of Andes, landscaper Mel Bellar and CMC board member Ann Roberti. The entrance to the Trail and to the historic train station has been opened up and improved so that parking is now available adjacent to the trailhead. The trailhead itself has a newly redesignedIMG_5323 entrance. The parking area was paved with crushed stone by LaFever Excavating. While there, they generously donated work to improve a long existing drainage problem on the trail. The CMC thanks all those involved in these projects for a great job.

Hike to Split Rock | Thursday, May 10, 10:00 am

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Split Rock

Nice spring walk out to Split Rock and return. Just a short hike for a spring day. Spring ephemeral wildflowers may be in bloom.

Event Duration:  3 miles, 2.5 hours

Level of Difficulty: Moderate

Leader(s): Bob Moses

Bring: good hiking shoes, lunch, bug spray, something to drink

Registration required by May 9.  Register by contacting the leader. See below.

Group size is limited to 12, so register early.

Dogs allowed:  Yes, only with permission of event leader

Questions about this event can be directed to:  rmoses@delhitel.net

Driving Directions:  From Margaretville: Take SR 28/30 west and turn on SR 30 at Dunraven towards Downsville. Go 15.2 miles and turn left on to Holiday Brook Rd. Go 2.9 miles to the top of the hill, Parking area on the left.
4256 Holiday Brook Rd
Roscoe, NY 12776

Annual Ephemeral Wildflower Hike @ Kelly Hollow | Sunday, May 13th, 11:00 AM

Trout Lilly D

Trout Lily

This a chance to find and identify the beautiful Spring Ephemeral wildflowers which are so named because they appear above ground in early spring when they flower and fruit and then die back into the ground, all in a short period before the trees have had a chance to leaf out. Most hikers never see these flowers because they wait for late spring or summer to get into the woods. We will look for Trillium, Spring beauties, Trout Lily, Hepatica, Violets, Squirrel Corn, Dutchman’s Britches, Jack-In-The-Pulpit and many others. We may also find some early mushrooms.

Kelly Hollow is one of the most beautiful short trails in the Catskills with rocky streams and waterfalls. It has a combination of coniferous and deciduous forests with the remains of a lovely beaver pond near a lean-to at the top. The trail is an easy to moderate loop of about 4 miles. Bring lunch and/or snacks to have at the lean-to (there is a privy nearby.) Continue reading

Hike to Quick Lake and Hodge Pond Mountain | Wednesday, April 25, 8:00 AM

IMG_2530We’ll hike 7.2 miles on the Quick Lake Trail to the Quick Lake shelter. After lunch we’ll retrace our path about 1/4 mile beyond Coyote Junction before bushwhacking about 1 mile (with about 200 ft elevation gain) over Hodge Pond Mountain (#99 of Catskill Hundred Highest) to Junkyard Junction. From Junkyard Junction we’ll follow the Flynn Trail 3.3 miles to the parking area. Our pace will be moderate, and we’ll have frequent, short water/snack breaks. This hike is listed as difficult because of the length (14.5 miles) and the unpredictable nature of the short bushwhack.

Event Duration:  14.5 miles, 10 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Difficult due to length, Bushwhack

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Hiking the Bluelines: Exploring Catskill Mountain Streams

Diamond Notch Falls-MikeTodaro

Diamond Notch Falls

This is a series of nine hikes sponsored by the Catskill Mountain Club (CMC) and led by Team Danger Girl (TDG), a Catskill Mountain-based hiking group. Join members of TDG for a scientific and exploratory engagement with Catskill mountain streams. Dorcinda Knauth and Dany Davis will lead this series of off trail explorations. Dany is a geologist with 17 years of experience studying Catskill Mountain streams and will lead the scientific part of these explorations. Other environmental scientists may join some of the hikes. The theme of these hikes can be along the lines of the saying “the journey is the destination”. In other words, the purpose of these hikes is not to put peaks in a collection bag, so the summit is not the ultimate destination. Instead, the hikes will focus on landscape interpretation, exploring wild sections of popular mountains by following the paths of streams, collecting data for a regional Catskill streams study, and maybe getting to the top of a mountain on some of the hikes.

There will be two categories of hikes: off trail adventurous explorations and trail-side family friendly engagements with streams. Both categories will include plenty of time sharing observations of the stream channel, ecosystem and riparian environment. We will stop often for discussions on the role of streams in the mountains, collecting some data on the stream’s shape and condition, as well as sharing lessons in landscape interpretation.

The family friendly hikes will focus on hands-on engagement in studying a stream at specific stream locations, walking the stream channel corridor to observe changes (expect to get wet) and encourage hikers to appreciate the role of streams in the Catskill environment. If children join, it would be best for the children to be school age and capable of hiking a couple of miles. These hikes will be limited to 10 participants plus the hike leaders (maximum group size is 12-14 depending on the hike).

The adventurous off trail explorations will be stream corridor bushwhacks up/down wild Catskill mountain terrain with some trail hiking. Science will be a central part of these hikes and there may be more stream data collection than in the family friendly hikes. The hikes are rated “Most Difficult” due to the variability of the headwater stream terrain, hiking in steep boulder streams, plenty of downed trees, and the ever present unknown one encounters when heading up/down a steep mountain drainage. Each of these hikes will have a mountain summit destination in mind; however, the science and exploration is the primary goal. Conditions may preclude getting to the top of the mountain. The hikes will be limited to 6-8 people plus the hike leaders (no more than 8-10 hikers total). Please note: your hike leaders will not have previously hiked some of these routes so obstacles to forward progress are unknown for some of these hikes – that is part of the adventure. Each hiker will need to consider themselves expert in off trail hiking in mountains. Footwear should be capable of hiking in and out of water (no sandals!).

See event listing links below for details. Contact Dany Davis at wddavis2@gmail.com with questions about the hikes and to register.

The proposed hikes and schedule are subject to change:

May 5  8AM – Dark

Bear Hole Brook to Van Wyck Mountain. Rating: Most Difficult. Meeting Place: Bear Hole Brook PA on Ulster County Route 42 (Peekamoose Road). The inaugural Bluelines hike will include stream-whacking up Bear Hole Brook to access the Catskill Divide between Van Wyck and Table Mountains. The return trip will be via the Van Wyck ridge. Be prepared for biting insects, loose rocks and other stream scrambling hazards, thick forest, cliffy bits and Catskill yetis. Total Distance: 6-8 miles depending upon the route.  NOTE: This hike is full.

May 12  8AM – Dark

Hunter Brook or West Kill stream to Hunter Mountain. Most Difficult. Meeting place: Spruceton Trailhead. This hike is likely to be the most challenging and should only be attempted by those capable of hiking in the Catskill’s most rugged terrain. This will involve hiking the Hunter Brook or West Kill stream corridor up the drainage toward the summit of Hunter Mountain. The approach to Hunter’s summit will involve very steep terrain in thick balsam forest (what fun!). If Hunter is summited, the hike may take a trail back down or, if adventure prevails take another stream back down. Be prepared for biting insects, loose rocks and other stream scrambling hazards, thick forest, cliffy bits and Catskill yetis. Total Distance: 7-10 miles depending upon the route.  NOTE: This hike is full.

June 2  8AM – Dark

Biscuit Brook to Fir Mountain. Rating: Difficult. Meeting place: Biscuit Brook trailhead. This will involve hiking the Biscuit Brook trail to the NYS land/Frost Valley land boundary and then following the stream corridor to the col between Big Indian and Fir Mountains. If Fir Mountain is summited the return trip will be by herdpath and trail back to the Biscuit Brook trailhead, or if adventure prevails the unnamed stream between Fir and Spruce Mountains. There will be ongoing research in this watershed by Colorado State University so we may get some fresh insights into Catskill stream geomorphology! Be prepared for biting insects, stinging nettles, loose boulders and other stream scrambling hazards, thick forest, cliffy bits and Catskill yetis. Total Distance: 8-10 miles depending upon the route.  NOTE: This hike is full.

June 23 10AM – 4PM

Family friendly exploration hike TBD. Rating: Moderate. Meeting place: TBD Stay tuned, we are considering either a hike to the Vernooy Kill or taking break from the Catskills and exploring a stream on the Northern Shawangunk Ridge.

July 7 8AM – 7PM

Applied Fluvial Geomorphology in the Stony Clove Watershed. Rating: Easy-Moderate. Meeting place: Phoenicia municipal parking on NYS Rt 214. This is not a hike. Join Dany Davis and other scientists for a tour of a stream research watershed in the Catskill Mountains. The tour will include driving to several locations in the Stony Clove watershed to check out ongoing research activities and visit some stream restoration projects. Plan for some short to moderately long walks to a range of locations on both state and private land. This is an opportunity for exploring the research and applications of stream geomorphology in a Catskill watershed. The tour will be limited to 15 participants and will require carpooling.

July 21 10AM – 4PM

Family friendly exploration of Kanape Brook with a possible visit to the summit of Ashokan High Point. Rating: Moderate. Meeting Place: Kanape Brook PA in the Town of Olive. The hike will include stopping at specific locations along the brook to observe channel and riparian forest conditions. Data collection will be part of the activities for a local study, and participants will be shown techniques for participation. Be prepared for biting insects, stinging nettles, loose rocks and other stream scrambling hazards, and very excitable stream scientists! Total Distance: ~3 miles for the stream (out and back) or 7-8 if including Ashokan High Point.

August 4 10AM – 4PM

Family friendly exploration of Rochester Hollow Creek. Rating: Moderate. Meeting place: Rochester Hollow PA in the Town of Shandaken. This will involve meeting at the Rochester Hollow parking area and taking the trail up the valley for approximately 1.5 miles and then returning back to the parking area by way of the stream. The hike will include stopping at specific locations to observe stream channel and riparian forest conditions. Data collection will be part of the activities for a local study, and participants will be shown techniques for participation. Be prepared for biting insects, stinging nettles, Loose rocks and other stream scrambling hazards, and very excitable stream scientists! Total Distance: ~ 3 miles.

September 15 8AM – 7PM

An exploration of Woodland Creek’s headwaters TBD. Rating: Most Difficult. Meeting Place: Woodland Valley Campground PA. The plan will be to bushwhack across the base of the Wittenberg along NYS land to the headwater reaches of Woodland Creek. From there, the assembled group will pick a route up any of the several branches of Woodland Creek, potentially ascending Slide, Cornell or Wittenberg; or just turning around and heading back to the PA. Be prepared for biting insects, stinging nettles, loose rocks and other stream scrambling hazards, thick forest, cliffy bits and Catskill yetis. Total Distance: ~7-12 miles.

October 13 9AM – 6PM

Cascade Brook to Panther Mountain/Giant Ledge. Rating: Difficult. Meeting Place: Giant Ledge PA. The hike will include walking down CR47 to Cascade Brook (~1 mile) to reach the stream route up Panther Mountain then walking along the left descending side of the stream to stay on NYS land for the first 0.5 miles. After that, the hike stays in the stream drainage until it disappears in the talus below Panther’s summit. The route up Panther will be along a SW-trending ridge to the summit view point. From there the return hike is via trail to Giant Ledge and back to the PA. Be prepared for biting insects, loose rocks and other stream scrambling hazards, thick forest, cliffy bits and Catskill yetis. Total Distance: ~7 miles.

Volunteer with the CMC! You’ll Love It (and so will We).

CMC_logo_border_220x220Do You Have Some Time to Spare? Love to Pitch in on a Community Project? Looking for a Good Excuse to Get Out of the House (and Into the Woods)? We’ve Got You Covered!

We admit it. We’ve got big eyes. We look around at all of the great things happening in the Catskills and we want to jump into the action. But, alas, we could use lots more help. Here’s what’s coming up. See something that appeals? Just get in touch with us and we’ll tell you how you can help.

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Read All About It in the The CMC’s Winter 2018 Newsletter

CMCpatchStuckis

Yours free with membership. Or buy it for $5.

Winter 2018 Newsletter

Have you come home from a winter hike to find that a tick has attached itself to you!? Maybe you’ve been out on a little adventure on the trails and found yourself on your butt more times than you care to remember. Read our review of traction devices and you’ll soon be prepared for another, safer outing. These articles and much more are yours to read by clicking here. Subscribe to our mailing list to get future newsletters and CMC updates in your mailbox automatically. Just give us your name, email address and mailing address and you’ll be kept informed about CMC happenings. We promise not to flood your inbox.

Of course, our favorite option would be that you become a CMC member. Our modest membership dues are what we rely on to make the wheels go ’round. And you get some nice perks with your annual membership. Check it out. Thanks.

Saturday, March 31, 8:00 AM | Woodhull Mountain & Van Wyck Mountain Hike

Van Wyck, Woodhull, Red Hill from Slide

Van Wyck, Woodhull, Red Hill from Slide

This bushwhack will visit two Catskill Hundred Highest peaks, Woodhull & Van Wyck Mountains. We’ll travel at a slow to moderate pace. There will be excellent views of several nearby high peaks, and we’ll visit two plane crash sites.

 

Event Duration:  7 miles, 5 hours

Level of Difficulty: Difficult — Bushwhack

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Sunday, March 11, 9:00 AM | Family Friendly Hike on the Palmer Hill Trail

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Photo courtesy of Bill Palmer

Join NYSDEC Licensed Guide Will Soter for this family friendly hike along the Palmer Hill Trail. This is the first of a series of hikes, in which Will hopes to highlight some of his favorite family friendly adventures. Will would also like to showcase the great efforts of the Catskill Mountain Club, that has worked to open recreational access in the Catskills. The Palmer Hill Trail is the third trail created by the Catskill Mountain Club, and the second in partnership with the NYC DEP. The Catskill Mountain Club created this trail from design to construction, taking great care to highlight the splendid views for most of its 3.7 mile length.

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Saturday, March 31, 10 AM | Huckleberry Loop Trail

DSC03459fromLauraFrom the trailhead on Hill Road in Margaretville, we will have a nice spring walk to the lookout over the reservoir. On the way we will pass a bog which is only 700+ years old. At the lookout, you can see the way we hiked up the hill and the Pepacton Reservoir in the distance.

Event Duration:  6.6 miles, 5.25 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Moderate-Difficult

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Catskills All Trails Challenge: De-listing the Jockey Hill Trails

After careful consideration, the CMC has decided to de-list the Jockey Hill Trails as a hike required to qualify for the Catskills All Trails Challenge certificate of completion.

Like the Elm Ridge trails in Greene County, which were never listed as required hikes, Jockey Hill trails are multi-purpose and are designed with the needs of mountain biking users in mind. The Department of Environmental Conservation has indicated that the trail system at Jockey Hill will be expanded to serve those needs. These additions further change the hiking experience through the design of trails that form multiple loops. Similar improvements have been made at Elm Ridge, and the CMC applauds the decision of the DEC to expand mountain biking opportunities in the Catskill Park. However, such trails are not conducive to a satisfying hiking experience.

To those who have already hiked Jockey Hill in its current configuration, we say congratulations. We hope you enjoyed your explorations there. Feedback from some CATs hikers, along with consultation with the DEC about the expanded system have informed our decision. Of course, any hiker is more than welcome to explore both Jockey Hill and Elm Ridge. Until the current supply of CATs Challenge tee shirts runs out, Jockey Hill will continue to be listed on the shirt. It will be removed from the published list of required hikes.

As this development illustrates, the trail system in the Catskill Park in dynamic. New trails are sometimes added and old trails are sometimes rerouted or abandoned. We appreciate input from our members and friends and look forward to hearing from you as you continue the quest. Thanks for participating and for spreading the word about the Catskills All Trails Challenge and the wonderful trails and features that are discovered with each hike!

Saturday, March 17, 11:00 AM | Kelly Hollow Hike

beaverDamSectionIMG_2721Join us on this nice loop hike past a huge spruce plantation, waterfalls and out to an old beaver pond.  We’ll stop at the adjacent lean-to for lunch.

Event Duration:  4 miles, 2.25 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Moderate

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Saturday, May 26, 11 AM | Paddle the Pepacton

P5260785smExperience an incredible outdoor adventure, paddling the beautiful Pepacton Reservoir. Join Catskill Mountain Club board member Ann Roberti for a scenic paddle on this recently opened NYC reservoir. Bring your own CANOE or KAYAK (it must be steam cleaned prior to putting it in the reservoir — see more below) or rent from a local business that has kayaks stored on site. 

We will launch promptly at 11AM from the Shavertown Bridge Recreational Boating Launch site on the north side of the bridge.

Life jackets required. All boats must be steam cleaned prior to arrival on site and have a valid DEP access sticker. Many vendors store boats on site, requiring only that you visit the store to pay and to pick up paddles and PFDs. For more information on regulations, please visit the NYCDEP website: http://www.nyc.gov/html/dep/pdf/recreation/Pepacton_Boating_Brochure.pdf

Pre-register by Friday, May 25th by emailing Ann Roberti at aroberti@catskill.net.

Directions: From SR 28/30 in Margaretville, go west about 3 miles to the dividing of the highways. Turn south onto SR 30 and go 8 miles to the Shavertown Bridge,  turning north onto CR 1 just before crossing the bridge. The Boat Launch is on the left.

From SR 28 in Andes, turn south onto CR 1 and travel 8 miles to the Shavertown Bridge Boat Launch on the right.

CatskillsTroutTalesCatskillMountainClub

Sunday, April 8th 10:00 AM | Hike the Shavertown Trail

Hikers heading back after enjoying the view

Hike the Shavertown Trail near the Pepacton Reservoir’s Shavertown Bridge Boat Launch. After a good climb for the first mile there will be a beautiful view overlooking the reservoir.  We will enjoy the view and walk around Snake Pond.  If the group is inclined, we will continue up an easier climb for a 3.3 mile loop returning to the pond and then back to the parking area. The upper loop is an nice second growth forest and beautiful rock formations.  This is an enjoyable hike for almost everyone. The total distance 2.3 or 5.3 miles.

Wear sturdy shoes and bring water and snacks or lunch.

Register by April 6th by emailing aroberti@catskill.net.

Well behaved dogs with permission of the hike leader (email aroberti@catskill.net).

Directions: From SR 28 in Margaretville turn left on SR 30.  Continue 8 miles to the Shavertown Bridge. Turn right and park at the upper parking area by the boat launch.

From Livingston Manor, take the Beaverkill Road, to Barkaboom Road pass Little Pond continue to the Shavertown Bridge turn right across bridge and left to the upper parking area by boat launch.

CatskillsTroutTalesCatskillMountainClub

Catskill Park Day 2018: A Call to Action

CPC graphic

 

In only a few days the CMC and its Catskill Park Coalition partners will go to Albany for our annual Catskill Park Day. We’ll meet with our elected representatives, including the Governor and members of the legislature, to press for action on the policy priorities we have identified for 2018.

If you are not able to travel with us to Albany for Catskill Park Day, there’s a way to speak up and speak out right from the comfort of your home or office. By raising your voice, you amplify our message and add power to its effectiveness.

You can either send Governor Cuomo a brief letter of support for the priorities of the Catskill Mountain Club and its Catskill Park Coalition partners, or you can call the Governor’s office and give a brief message of support.

Catskill Park Coalition - Budget Priorities 2018 (Final)

Click to enlarge

Below are the specific requests made by the CPC for 2018. Simply glance at them, pick one or two that resonates with you and place your call telling the assistant who answers what you would like the Governor to support.

If you prefer to write a note, we have provided a link to the form used by the Governor’s office. You can simply copy and paste the message we have written below or edit it to suit your preferences.

We have had good results over the past several years and anticipate continued success with support from folks like you who love the Catskills and care about its future.

Thank you for your efforts!

Phone number of the Governor’s office: (518) 474-8390   Office hours: 9:00am to 5:00pm

Link to the Governor’s email system: https://www.governor.ny.gov/content/governor-contact-form

Sample letter:

Dear Governor Cuomo,

I am writing today to respectfully ask that you give your support to the priorities for the Catskill Park and region as expressed by the Catskill Mountain Club and its fellow members of the Catskill Park Coalition.

The Catskill Park is one of our nation’s great natural assets, encompassing hundreds of thousands of acres of pristine wilderness and sparkling clean waters. It is home to huge communities of rare wildlife and to one of the most diverse forests in the world. And it is one of New York’s greatest outdoor recreational areas, along with the Adirondack Park.

Please support the continuing improvements to the Catskills environment and Park infrastructure that allow members of the public to experience the great outdoors in all its glory in a way that is both safe and sustainable.

Sincerely,

Saturday, March 3, 8:30 AM | Hunter Mountain Fire Tower Snowshoe

Hunter Mtn.

Hunter Mtn.

Snowshoe at a slow to moderate pace to Southwest Hunter and Hunter Mountains. Excellent views from the Fire Tower, and Geiger Point. For those working on the Catskill All Trails Challenge, we’ll complete the Spruceton and Hunter Mountain trails, and will cover a part of the Devil’s Path. We’ll reach Southwest Hunter via a 3/4 mile unmarked trail off of the Devil’s Path. After the hike, a mile down the road on our way home, we can warm up by the fire at the West Kill Brewing tap room.

Event Duration:  10 miles, 8 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Difficult
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Saturday, February 17, 10 AM | Alder Lake to Beaver Meadow

IMG_3739We will meet at the entrance to Alder Lake and hike around Alder Lake and over a couple of hills to Beaver Meadow lean-to. It is a nice snowshoe if snow permits. The beavers are back in Alder Lake and will by their lodge on the way to the Lean-to.

Event Duration:  7 miles, 4.25 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Moderate

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Sunday, March 4, 9:30 AM | Balsam Lake Mountain

BLM winterThis great hike will begin on Mill Brook Rd. and follow the Dry Brook Ridge Trail to the BLM summit with its iconic fire tower. The hike will continue, completing the loop and returning to the starting point. Expect rewarding views and hope for a good base to permit snowshoeing.

Event Duration:  7 miles, 6 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Moderate-Difficult

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Saturday, February 10, 8 AM | Balsam & Eagle Hike

IMG_2066Snowshoe hike to two 3500 peaks, Balsam & Eagle, at a slow to moderate pace. There will be a nice view from the approach to Balsam Mountain. For those working on the Catskill All Trails Challenge, this hike will complete the Seager – Big Indian trail, and the Mine Hollow trail; and will cover part of the Pine Hill – West Branch trail, and a very small part of the Oliverea – Mapledale trail.

Event Duration: 8.6 miles, 7 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Moderate-Difficult Continue reading

Overlook Mountain: New Parking Area and Trail Will Relieve a Big Problem

Overlook Mountain new parking & trailsDecember 19, 2017

The DEC opened the new Meads Meadow Trailhead parking area on McDaniel Rd. today. A new trail system explores the Magic Meadow parcel, and the new connector trail leads to the existing trail to the summit and fire tower.

Severe overuse has long plagued hikers with parking problems that resulted in dangerous conditions on the road for hikers and drivers alike. A downloadable map is available on the CMC website here: Overlook Mountain new parking & trails.

New: Catskills Trail Conditions Reports from the Catskill Interpretive Center

The Catskill Interpretive Center has added a very valuable service for visitors who hike in the Catskills. The weekly updated trail condition reports offer vital news about all sorts of hazards and problems that hikers might encounter. Things like washouts, trail obstructions, weather related conditions and other related info can be found in one convenient spot. Check out the CMC Facebook page on Thursdays for a link to the new reports, or visit the Catskill Interpretive Center’s trail conditions webpage.

The CMC is an operating partner of the Catskill Interpretive Center. To support out work there, please consider donating to or joining the CMC. Thank you.

CMC Annual Dinner fun for all

Attendees enjoyed the company, fine food and the informative talk by Tom Davidock of the NYC DEP.davidockatdinner

 

Raffle Prize Winners!

 

First Prize:

Beth Waterman, who chose the snowshoes to replace her old style wooden snowshoes

 

Second Prize:

Jack McShane, who chose the Jack Mesick limited edition print. Jack is getting quite a collection of Jack Mesick prints, as he has won these twice in the past.

 

Third Prize:

Edie Mesick, kayak

 

We have a new “Wildflowers of the Catskills” page!

Visit our newly expanded page covering Wildflowers of the Catskills.

We now list over 130 species and cover the seasons from early spring through fall. With Spring arriving and a new year of blooms on the way, what better way to enjoy them than to get prepared by familiarizing yourself with them? Our page is set up for quick reference and it focusses on the flowers you will see right here in the Catskills! Check it out.

HIGHLIGHTS OF CMC’S 2016 SEASON

STEWARDSHIP– The CMC annually maintains five CMC trails totaling 20 miles and seven DEC trails totaling nearly 25 miles. In 2016, 36 trail maintenance hikes were conducted totaling 750 volunteer hours, all headed by the Club’s VP , Wendell George.

TRAIL BUILDING– Since 2011, the CMC has built 5 new hiking trails on lands owned by NYC DEP as well as Delaware Academy. The newest trail, that to the former fire tower on Bramley Mountain near Delhi NY, was opened on July 29th . The opening ceremony was attended by nearly 40 hiking enthusiasts, local, state and City officials and followed by a hike to the summit.
The five CMC trails have been very popular since their openings. Over the past year nearly 5600 hikers have signed-in on these trails. Approximate counts by trail are:

  • Delhi Trails – over 1000 visitors in 2016
  • Palmer Hill Trails – 1300 in the last year
  • Shavertown Trail – 1200 in the last year.
  • Andes Rail Trail & Bullet Hole Spur- 1500 in the last year
  • Bramley Mountain Trails – 600 hikers from opening day thru December

This year the CMC produced a brochure/map highlighting these five trails. The brochure is being distributed at all CMC trailheads as well as various informational kiosks and at the Catskill Interpretive Center in Mt. Tremper. The maps of the five CMC trails can also be viewed on our website from the Where to Go menu.

CMC EVENTS– CMC members led over 40 Hikes, paddles and other CMC events in 2016 that were enjoyed by 400+ participants. In addition CMC members are leading over 25 events for this year’s Catskill Lark in the Park. Upcoming hikes and other CMC events can be viewed on the CMC website at Upcoming Events.

ADVOCACY – The CMC is involved with several organizations advocating for outdoor recreational concerns affecting the Catskill area.
The Catskill Park Coalition is a partnership of many Catskill organizations, all concerned with outdoor recreation and related public land concerns. Each February the Coalition members travel to Albany for Catskill Park Awareness Day, advocating for increased funding for outdoor recreation, conservation and tourism related issues. In 2016 the Coalition succeeded in obtaining $500,000 dedicated for use within the Catskill Park. Part of this allocation is being used for the creation of a new comprehensive recreation plan as well as various infrastructure improvements. In addition, the continuation of the NYS Ranger Academy was stressed as well as the hiring of 2 assistant Forest Rangers, both which were granted. Also, $994,000 was asked for and allocated for the Catskill Interpretative Center, which opened on NYS Rte 28 in Mt. Tremper in July of 2015. The funding will allow for the building of a full scale old style fire tower, a fire warden’s cabin, a picnic pavilion, an amphitheater and new road side signage.
Information on the 2017 Awareness Day can be viewed at catskillcenter.org/awareness-day/.

The Catskill Park Advisory Committee –  The Committee is a group of local government representatives, agencies and  area organizations representing the various communities and user groups of the Catskill Park and the Catskill Watershed. The purpose of the Committee is to provide assistance, advice and guidance to the NYSDEC, the New York City Department of Environmental Protection and other land managers in the management of the New York State Forest Preserve, the Catskill Park and the Catskill Watershed. The CMC is a charter member of this Committee and meets with it on a quarterly basis.

STAFFING of the Maurice Hinchey Catskill Interpretitive Center (CIC) – The CMC is one of five operating partners for the CIC and provides part of the volunteer staff operating the center 363 days a year. In all,  CMC members volunteered over 600 hours for its operation in 2016. The CIC opened in July, 2015. catskillinterpretivecenter.org.

CMC DONATIONS –  $1000 to Summit Stewards Program – Summit Stewards patrol the summit areas of Giant Ledge/Panther, Slide, Wittenberg, and Cornell mountains during the summer hiking period. They work closely with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, and address the unique concerns of these peaks to the hikers they encounter. See Summit Stewards.

$1000 to the Catskill Interpretive Center – The CIC is the Catskills Tourist Information Center.

LARK IN THE PARK 2016– Last year was the 12th annual Lark in the Park and featured 50 separate events over 10 days from October 3rd to the 12th and was enjoyed for nearly 750 attendees. For this year’s 2016 program we had 60 events , many being held by 19 Catskill Based organizations such as Mountain Keeper, Catskill Rec. Center, Trout Unlimited and the 3500 Club. The CMC has been the main driving force of this annual event celebrating the creation of the Catskill Park. CMC members have spent over 200 man hours, planning and leading events. See catskilsllark.org.

CATSKILL ALL TRAILS CHALLENGE– In 2014 the CMC created this unique opportunity for hikers
to receive recognition for the hiking of all 87 trails and 350 miles of Catskill Park Trails. This year we
had 15 hikers complete the Challenge bringing the total to 32. For more on the Challenge go to
http://catskillmountainclub.org/events/the-all-trails-hiking-challenge-redlining-the-catskills.

SOCIAL MEDIA– The Board of Directors of the CMC sees the use of the various social media platforms as vital for the future dissemination of CMC information, news, advocacy issues as well as trail conditions and hiker safety concerns. The CMC currently uses FaceBook for communicating with CMC members.

CMC BOARD OF DIRECTORS– The CMC Board meets every other month in Arkville, NY to discuss Club business, outdoor recreational issues, interface with other Catskill organizations and governments entities, plan events and review financial concerns During 2016 the all volunteer Directors spent on over 2000 man hours on club business.

$500,000 in Newly Released Funding Announced for a Catskills Comprehensive Recreation Plan and More

November 3, 2016   The Catskill Park Coalition, of which the CMC is a founding member, has successfully lobbied Albany for funds to support the Catskills since its founding four years ago. $500,000 has just been released for a variety of projects that will improve planning and public access. Read about the CPC’s latest success in this Watershed Post article. We will be in Albany again this February with our Coalition partners to speak to our government leaders about the needs of the Catskill Park and the region.

 

SUNY Delhi Students Work to Maintain Trails in the Western Catskills

img_0566On October 26 a group of SUNY Delhi students, led by Professor David DeForest of the Division of Applied Science and Recreation, maintained sections of the Mary Smith Trail and the Pelnor Hollow Trail from Berry Brook Road to Split Rock. The group cleared several blowdowns and lots of blackberries, etc. that had grown into the trail, making this area difficult to pass through.

The CMC would like to thank all participants for coming out on a chilly day and showing some love for the path to the spectacular Split Rock view.

DEC Announces Start of Early Bear Hunting Season – Sept. 10-25

In southeastern New York, including the Catskills, the early bear season runs from September 10 – 25. The early bowhunting season for bears will open in the entire Southern Zone on October 1, followed by the regular firearms season beginning November 19.

For more about hunting in New York visit http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/7857.html

CMC Receives the 2016 Alf Evers Award for Excellence

We are very pleased and proud to have received the prestigious 2016 Alf Evers Award for Excellence from the good folks at the Catskill Center. The presentation occurred during the Annual Summer Gathering at the Catskill Center’s offices in Arkville, NY.
As an organization that greatly values cooperation and collaboration, we salute the Catskill Center for its continuing leadership in our region, and we thank them for recognizing the CMC for playing a constructive role in the work at hand.

Following are remarks made by Catskill Center Executive Director Jeff Senterman at the presentation.

The Alf Evers Award for Excellence from the Catskill Center is presented to an individual or organization for their distinguished service to the Catskill region.

We are blessed in the Catskills to have so many individuals and groups who
• work hard to be stewards of our natural resources
• educate visitors about the proper use of the great outdoors
• and who have a sense of community spirit to improve our region.

One such group is the Catskill Mountain Club.

Founded in 2004 on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the creation of the Catskill Park.

The early Catskill Mountain Club, which included many Catskill Center staff grew and evolved since it’s founding to become committed to efforts to ensure sustainable and safe outdoor recreation on public lands throughout the Catskill region.

Today the Catskill Mountain Club strives to raise public awareness and appreciation of the Catskill region, something they rightly describe as “America’s First Wilderness”

The Catskill Mountain Club offer dozens of guided hikes, paddles, snow shoe excursions, bike trips and more all over the Catskills.

Offering visitors and residents amazing opportunities to get out and experience all that our Catskill Mountains have to offer.

But the Catskill Mountain Club isn’t only taking advantage of our region’s vast outdoor recreation resources, they are doing something to help ensure they are available for generations to come!

The Catskill Mountain Club stresses and promotes volunteer stewardship of our Catskill Park and public lands by getting their hands dirty!

They have constructed five new trails in the Catskills over the last four years – an amazing accomplishment, especially when considering at least some of those trails have been on New York City Department of Environmental Protection lands!

Those five trails…
• The Andes Rail Trail
• The Delhi Trails
• The Palmer Hill Trail
• The Shavertown Trail
• And most recently
• The Bramley Mountain Trail

Representing almost 20 miles of new trails, the Catskill Mountain Club is offering the public more options and leading the way on opening DEP lands for public recreation!

When not building trail, the Catskill Mountain Club maintains miles of hiking trails throughout the Catskill Park for the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation

They offer workshops and take part in events that highlight
• The natural and human histories of the Catskills,
• The issues that are affecting the health and preservation of the Catskills
• And teach the skills that are needed to safely enjoy our great outdoors!

They join with others of the Catskill Park Coalition to knock on doors in Albany, helping to ensure that the Catskill Park is represented and receives ongoing support.

Members of the Catskill Mountain Club even find time to help staff the Catskill Interpretive Center where their expertise on everything outdoors comes in handy to educate visitors to the Park!

All this and the Catskill Mountain Club is an all-volunteer grass roots led organization – SIMPLY AMAZING!

The Catskill Mountain Club is helping to lead the way towards a sustainable outdoor recreation based economy that while utilizes our vast and beautiful open spaces, while teaching our visitors and park users the value of the region and how to protect it for posterity

As a former member of the Catskill Mountain Club’s Board of Directors, I am truly honored and humbled to have had the chance to be part of this amazing organization and the amount of work that that the members of this organization have put in since my time is astounding!

For their work
• Protecting our natural resources
• Raising awareness and appreciation of our Catskills
• Leading activities across the public lands of our region
• Working with DEP to increase public access to watershed lands
• Building almost 20 miles of new trails
• Maintaining miles of Catskill Park hiking trails and
• Staffing the Catskill Interpretive Center

And most importantly for their love of the Catskills and their ability to protect and preserve the region

I am pleased to present the Alf Evers Award for Excellence to the Catskill Mountain Club in recognition of their leadership in creating and expanding opportunities for the public to enjoy and understand the unique beauty and remarkable nature of our Catskill region.

They have made a true impact across the region and it gives me great joy to present this award to
• Rick Roberts, the President of the Catskill Mountain Club
• Wendell George, the Vice-President of the Catskill Mountain Club
• And all members of the Catskill Mountain Club

THANK YOU from the Catskill Center and from the Catskills!

Announcing Our New Trails Brochure!

TrailsBrochurecoverTo celebrate the opening of our fifth trail this past Friday, located on Bramley Mountain, we have published a brochure called “A Guide to the Trails” that provides a map and description of each trail. The full color brochure will be available at each trailhead, at several village kiosks, at the Catskill Interpretive Center and at other locations that distribute tourism information.

With the guide, you’ll be able to hike each of our trails with confidence. The trail maps show contours at 20′ intervals, show notable features and indicate where trailheads are located, making it easy to find your way. Pick one up and keep it in your car or with your pack. You’ll always be prepared!

You can also download our trail maps to your iPhone or Android device for free. Look for links to the Avenza App and directions for how to get the maps in the Where To Go menu on this site.

Bramley Mountain Trail Opens

Bramleyopening8On July 29 the CMC’s newly constructed hiking trail on Bramley Mountain in the Towns of Delhi and Bovina officially opened to the public. Built on NYC DEP lands, the 4 mile trail is open year round.
The ceremony began with comments by DEP Deputy Commissioner Paul Rush, Delaware County Chamber of Commerce President Ray Pucci and CMC President Rick Roberts. Each spoke about the importance of DEP’s efforts to open its lands to public recreational use. Among the benefits of greater access are increased options for a range of low impact outdoor activities, economic growth due to increased visitorship and improved health for community members due to the proximity of attractive recreational options.
Following the ribbon cutting, the laBramleyopening5rge crowd headed off for the inaugural hike. Some participants chose to take the easy hike to the quarry and then return to the parking area, while others continued up the trail. After we reached the summit and enjoyed the views we took a little break for lunch or a snack, only to be surprised by a brief shower that chased us off the top. As we descended, we ate raspberries growing beside the trail and noticed that the blackberries will be rippening soon. There are tons of them, so we’ll be back for the feast in a few weeks.
Bramleyopening1The Bramley Mountain Trail is one of five that the CMC has built over the last five years. To celebrate that work and for the convenience of hikers, we’ve published a brochure that provides a map and describes each of them. Look for it at the trail registers, in visitor information sites in the villages and at the Catskill Interpretive Center on State Route 28 in Mt. Tremper.
Click here for WBNG News coverage:
  http://www.wbng.com/news/local/A-new-hiking-trail-opens-at-Bramley-Mountain–388708722.html?vid=a

The Bramley Mountain Trail is Set to Open on JULY 29 at 12:00 PM

We are thrilled to announce, along with the NYC DEP, that the new Bramley Mountain Trail will be officially opened to the public on July 29 at Noon. The CMC designed and built the trail, our third in partnership with the DEP. There will be a brief ceremony followed by a guided hike. The event is free and DEP permits are not required to hike on this parcel.untitled-59
The trail is on a 1243 acre parcel and summits the mountain at 2817′, one of the two westernmost 2800+ foot peaks in the Catskills. Bramley was once the site of a fire tower. The spectacular views from the summit ledges take in parts of the southern high peaks, Mount Pisgah and the mountains traversed by the Finger Lakes Trail. A short hike west is a view over the northwestern foothills and the farms that occupy them. Other features of the hike include a significant abandoned bluestone quarry, a small pond, numerous stone walls and foundations, and the fabulous cliffs and caves that lie between the quarry and the summit.
untitled-67We invite you to come join the fun on this special day. If you can’t, the trail is open year round. The trailhead is located on Glen Burnie Rd., about 0.7 miles south of CR 18 in Delhi.

Sunday, August 14th 1 pm | Paddle the Pepacton

Experience an incredible outdoor adventure, paddling the beautiful Pepacton Reservoir. Join Catskill Mountain Club board member Ann Roberti for a scenic paddle on this recently opened NYC reservoir. Provide your own CANOE or KAYAK or rent from a local business.  We will launch promptly at 1PM from the Shavertown Bridge Recreational Boating Launch site on the north side of the bridge. 

Life jackets required. All boats must be steam cleaned prior to arrival on site and have a valid DEP access sticker. Many vendors store boats on site, requiring only that you visit the store to pay and to pick up paddles and PFDs. For more information on regulations, please visit the NYCDEP website: http://www.nyc.gov/html/dep/pdf/recreation/Pepacton_Boating_Brochure.pdf

Pre-register and questions to Ann Roberti at news@catskillmountainclub.org.

This paddle is part of Andes Community Day events.  See more by clicking here.

Directions: From SR 28/30 in Margaretville, go west about 3 miles to the dividing of the highways. Turn south onto SR 30 and go 8 miles to the Shavertown Bridge,  turning north onto CR 1 just before crossing the bridge. The Boat Launch is on the left.

From SR 28 in Andes, turn south onto CR 1 and travel 8 miles to the Shavertown Bridge Boat Launch on the right.

Saturday, July 9, 2 PM | Hike Plattekill Mt. from the Ski Center Lodge

In conjunction with the NYS Outdoor EXPO, CMC President Rick Roberts is leading a hike up Plattekill Mt. using existing ski trails. Beautiful views at the top. This moderately difficult hike is about 2.5 miles long with 800′ gain.

Wear good hiking shoes and bring plenty of water. Well behaved dogs are welcome. Pre-registration is not required for this event.

Directions: Take NYS Route 28 to NYS Route 30 in Margarettville . Go north approximately 8 miles and turn west onto Cold Spring Road. Or take NYS Route 23 to Grand Gorge and turn south onto Route 30. Go 11 miles and turn west onto Cold Spring Road.  Follow signs to Ski Plattekill  – 3 miles off Route 30.

SUNDAY, JUNE 25 | Balsam to Belleayre

IMG_1628Hike to Balsam and Belleayre Mountains. Views and more!.
Lovely 10 mile hike for experienced hikers and those seeking 3500 peaks, all trails and hundred highest! There is a lovely but serious climb up McKenley Hollow. We will traverse Balsam Mountain and go on to Belleayre where we will side track to see the sights from the ski mountain area, then end with a decent on the Cathedral Glen Trail. Come join the fun outdoors this summer! Continue reading

Thursday, June 16, 9 AM | Bramley Mountain Trail Construction One More Time

Bramley view wnwcrOn this trip we will finish the clearing of the trails and views. We’ll assess our work with an eye for small problems, checking areas where we have made improvements to be sure that they are in good condition after recent rainstorms and light use by the crew. We’ll have some tools to lend, but bring sturdy shears and/or loppers, if you have them. Work gloves will be useful. Continue reading