Upcoming Events

CMC EVENTS CALENDAR

Photo courtesy of Bill Palmer, Palmer Hill Photography.

 

April 2019

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

1 2 3 4

10:00 AM

Cabot Mountain in the Pepacton Range

5 6
7 8 9 10 11

8:00 AM

Dry Brook Ridge

12 13
14 15 16 17

9:00 AM

Mongaup Loop

18

10:00 AM

Middle Mountain to Mary Smith Hill

19 20 Passover

Bramley Mountain and Delhi Trails Maintenance

21 Easter 22   Earth Day
23 24 25

10:00 AM

Bramley Mountain

 

26 27
28 29 30

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Hike from Woodland Valley to Phoenicia | May 22, 2019 at 7:30 AM

Wittenberg from the Phoenicia-East Branch Trail on Cross Mountain

We’ll follow the Phoenicia – East Branch trail from Woodland Valley to Lane St. in Phoenicia. The first 2.8 miles are coincident with a Red blazed section of the Red, Wittenberg – Cornell – Slide trail. The last 9.1 miles are coincident with a Blue blazed section of the Long Path. Along this section, we’ll descend the Grand Staircase (a long series of rock steps along the side of a cliff) and follow the ridge comprising Cross Mountain, Mt. Pleasant, and Romer Mountain. The views are magnificent.

Event Duration: 12 miles, 10 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Difficult

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Biking Around the Pepacton Reservoir | Sunday, May 19, 2019 at 1:00 PM

Pepacton Reservoir from the Shavertown Bridge

This will be a relaxed-paced bike ride around the eastern Pepacton Reservoir using the Reservoir Road, the Shavertown Bridge, Route 30 and Route 28.

This route offers one of Delaware County’s most pleasant bike loops with gentle rolling hills, light traffic and views of the reservoir throughout the ride.

Event Duration: 18 miles; 2-3 hours

Level of Difficulty: Easy-Moderate

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Hike the Mongaup Loop | Wednesday, April 17, 2019 9:00 AM

Mongaup PondStarting at the suspension bridge over the scenic Beaver Kill, we’ll hike to Mongaup Pond via the Mongaup – Hardenburgh trail. We’ll return via the Mongaup – Willowemoc and Long Pond Beaver Kill Ridge trails. Along the way, we’ll summit two Catskill Hundred Highest mountains: Willowemoc (3224 ft) and Sand Pond (3062 ft).

For those working on the Catskills All Trails Challenge, this hike completes the Mongaup – Hardenburgh, and Mongaup – Willowemoc trails, and the portion of the Long Pond Beaver Kill Ridge trail North of Flugertown Rd.

Event Duration: 18 miles, 12 hours

Level of Difficulty: Difficult due to length

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Hike Bramley Mountain | Thursday, April 25, 2019 10:00 AM

IMG_3768Bramley Mountain was once the site of a fire tower and the views from the summit to the Catskills ranges are impressive.  Along the way the trail visits an abandoned bluestone quarry, caves and many outcroppings. Approximately 900′ ascent.

Event Duration:  4.1 miles, 3.5 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Moderate-Difficult

Leader: Andes Hikers

Bring: good hiking shoes, snacks, plenty to drink, ice traction device and snowshoes depending on conditions. Hiking poles recommended. Maps available at the trailhead.

Registration required by April 24, 2019.  Register by contacting the leader. See below.

Group size is limited to 12, so register early.

Dogs allowed:  Yes, well behaved only.

Questions about this event and registrations can be directed to:  wendell@catskillmountainclub.org or call 845-586-6273. Provide contact information for the morning of the hike. Please be sure to notify the leader asap if you will need to cancel your registration.

Driving Directions:  The trailhead is located on Glen Burnie Rd. in Delhi, 0.7 miles south of CR 18  and 3.3 miles north of SR 28.

GPS coordinates: 42°17’57.5″N 74°50’09.6″W;  42.2993, -74.8360

Hike to Split Rock in the Pepacton Range | Thursday, May 9, 2019 10:00 AM

IMG_4700 Split RockJoin us for this hike to Split Rock on Brock Mountain in the Pepacton Range.  There’s a nice view to be had.  After spotting cars at Holiday and Berry Brook Rd., we’ll start at Cat Hollow Rd. / SR206, crossing Flat Rock on the way.  Approximately 1600′ ascent.

Event Duration:  6.3 miles, 7 hours

Level of Difficulty: Moderate-Difficult

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Winnisook Lake Mountain Bushwhack | Wednesday, February 13, 2019 9 AM Postponed due to weather.

Winnisook Lake (#56) Mountain is one of the Catskills 100 Highest.  The western summit of WLM is home to the Catskills “Stonehenge”.  This hike requires a bushwhack (no herd path) that can be very steep. Hikers should have off trail winter experience and full winter equipment since deep snow and ice are expected. The hike will be led by Alan Via, author of The Catskill 67 hiking guide.

Event Duration:  4 miles, 6 hours

Level of Difficulty:  Difficult. Bushwhack

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Dry Brook Ridge Hike | Thursday, April 11, 2019 8:00 AM

IMG_0770 Dry Brook Valley from Doubletop We’ll hike (or snowshoe) the 9.6 mile section of the Dry Brook Ridge trail from Mill Brook Road to Margaretville. A car shuttle is required. We’ll leave car(s) at the hike endpoint (https://goo.gl/maps/HEiNyk3n3h42) and drive to the Mill Brook parking area (https://goo.gl/maps/shyr2jJrpsQ2) to start. Our pace will be moderate with brief stops. There will not be a long lunch stop.

Event Duration: 10 miles, 10 hours

Level of Difficulty: Difficult

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Hiking the Bluelines: Exploring Catskill Mountain Streams

Diamond Notch Falls-MikeTodaro

Diamond Notch Falls

This is a series of nine hikes sponsored by the Catskill Mountain Club (CMC) and led by Team Danger Girl (TDG), a Catskill Mountain-based hiking group. Join members of TDG for a scientific and exploratory engagement with Catskill mountain streams. Dorcinda Knauth and Dany Davis will lead this series of off trail explorations. Dany is a geologist with 17 years of experience studying Catskill Mountain streams and will lead the scientific part of these explorations. Other environmental scientists may join some of the hikes. The theme of these hikes can be along the lines of the saying “the journey is the destination”. In other words, the purpose of these hikes is not to put peaks in a collection bag, so the summit is not the ultimate destination. Instead, the hikes will focus on landscape interpretation, exploring wild sections of popular mountains by following the paths of streams, collecting data for a regional Catskill streams study, and maybe getting to the top of a mountain on some of the hikes.

There will be two categories of hikes: off trail adventurous explorations and trail-side family friendly engagements with streams. Both categories will include plenty of time sharing observations of the stream channel, ecosystem and riparian environment. We will stop often for discussions on the role of streams in the mountains, collecting some data on the stream’s shape and condition, as well as sharing lessons in landscape interpretation.

The family friendly hikes will focus on hands-on engagement in studying a stream at specific stream locations, walking the stream channel corridor to observe changes (expect to get wet) and encourage hikers to appreciate the role of streams in the Catskill environment. If children join, it would be best for the children to be school age and capable of hiking a couple of miles. These hikes will be limited to 10 participants plus the hike leaders (maximum group size is 12-14 depending on the hike).

The adventurous off trail explorations will be stream corridor bushwhacks up/down wild Catskill mountain terrain with some trail hiking. Science will be a central part of these hikes and there may be more stream data collection than in the family friendly hikes. The hikes are rated “Most Difficult” due to the variability of the headwater stream terrain, hiking in steep boulder streams, plenty of downed trees, and the ever present unknown one encounters when heading up/down a steep mountain drainage. Each of these hikes will have a mountain summit destination in mind; however, the science and exploration is the primary goal. Conditions may preclude getting to the top of the mountain. The hikes will be limited to 6-8 people plus the hike leaders (no more than 8-10 hikers total). Please note: your hike leaders will not have previously hiked some of these routes so obstacles to forward progress are unknown for some of these hikes – that is part of the adventure. Each hiker will need to consider themselves expert in off trail hiking in mountains. Footwear should be capable of hiking in and out of water (no sandals!).

See event listing links below for details. Contact Dany Davis at wddavis2@gmail.com with questions about the hikes and to register.

The proposed hikes and schedule are subject to change:

May 5  8AM – Dark

Bear Hole Brook to Van Wyck Mountain. Rating: Most Difficult. Meeting Place: Bear Hole Brook PA on Ulster County Route 42 (Peekamoose Road). The inaugural Bluelines hike will include stream-whacking up Bear Hole Brook to access the Catskill Divide between Van Wyck and Table Mountains. The return trip will be via the Van Wyck ridge. Be prepared for biting insects, loose rocks and other stream scrambling hazards, thick forest, cliffy bits and Catskill yetis. Total Distance: 6-8 miles depending upon the route.  NOTE: This hike is full.

June 2  8AM – Dark

Biscuit Brook to Fir Mountain. Rating: Difficult. Meeting place: Biscuit Brook trailhead. This will involve hiking the Biscuit Brook trail to the NYS land/Frost Valley land boundary and then following the stream corridor to the col between Big Indian and Fir Mountains. If Fir Mountain is summited the return trip will be by herdpath and trail back to the Biscuit Brook trailhead, or if adventure prevails the unnamed stream between Fir and Spruce Mountains. There will be ongoing research in this watershed by Colorado State University so we may get some fresh insights into Catskill stream geomorphology! Be prepared for biting insects, stinging nettles, loose boulders and other stream scrambling hazards, thick forest, cliffy bits and Catskill yetis. Total Distance: 8-10 miles depending upon the route.  NOTE: This hike is full.

June 23 10AM – 4PM

Explore Kanape Brook watershed to the summit of Ashokan High Point. Rating: Moderate. Meeting Place: Kanape Brook PA in the Town of Olive. The hike will include stopping at specific locations along the brook to observe channel and riparian forest conditions. Data collection will be part of the activities for a local study, and participants will be shown techniques for participation.  Be prepared for biting insects, stinging nettles, loose rocks and other stream scrambling hazards, and very excitable stream scientists!  Total Distance: ~3 miles for the stream (out and back) or 7-8 if including Ashokan High Point.

July 7 9AM – Dark

West Kill stream to Hunter Mountain. Most Difficult. Meeting place: West Kill Trailhead. This hike is likely to be the most challenging and should only be attempted by those capable of hiking in the Catskill’s most rugged terrain. This will involve hiking the West Kill stream corridor up the drainage toward the summit of Hunter Mountain.  The approach to Hunter’s summit will involve very steep terrain in thick balsam forest (what fun!). If Hunter is summited, the hike may take a trail back down or, if adventure prevails take another stream back down. Be prepared for biting insects, loose rocks and other stream scrambling hazards, thick forest, cliffy bits and Catskill yetis. Total Distance: 7-10 miles depending upon the route.

July 21 10AM – 4PM

Explore Rochester Hollow Creek. Rating: Moderate. Meeting place: Rochester Hollow PA in the Town of Shandaken. This will involve meeting at the Rochester Hollow parking area and taking the trail up the valley for approximately 1.5 miles and then returning back to the parking area by way of the stream.  The hike will include stopping at specific locations to observe stream channel and riparian forest conditions.  Data collection will be part of the activities for a local study, and participants will be shown techniques for participation. Be prepared for biting insects, stinging nettles, Loose rocks and other stream scrambling hazards, and very excitable stream scientists!  Total Distance: ~ 3 miles.

August 4 8AM – 7PM

Explore East Branch Neversink River Headwaters and Slide Mountain. Rating: Difficult. Meeting place: Denning PA in the Town of Denning. The hike will start at the East Branch-Phoenicia trail to access the East Branch Neversink River valley. Depending on the ability and interest of the participants we will hike up the East Branch Neversink River or the Deer Shanty Brook toward Slide Mountain. The hike will focus on exploring the valley and stream environment and may include a bushwack summit of Slide Mountain if it seems feasible.  Total Distance is variable; assume a minimum 7 miles.

September 15 8AM – 7PM

An exploration of Woodland Creek’s headwaters TBD. Rating: Most Difficult. Meeting Place: Woodland Valley Campground PA. The plan will be to bushwhack across the base of the Wittenberg along NYS land to the headwater reaches of Woodland Creek. From there, the assembled group will pick a route up any of the several branches of Woodland Creek, potentially ascending Slide, Cornell or Wittenberg; or just turning around and heading back to the PA. Be prepared for biting insects, stinging nettles, loose rocks and other stream scrambling hazards, thick forest, cliffy bits and Catskill yetis. Total Distance: ~7-12 miles.

October 13 9AM – 6PM

Cascade Brook to Panther Mountain/Giant Ledge. Rating: Difficult. Meeting Place: Giant Ledge PA. The hike will include walking down CR47 to Cascade Brook (~1 mile) to reach the stream route up Panther Mountain then walking along the left descending side of the stream to stay on NYS land for the first 0.5 miles. After that, the hike stays in the stream drainage until it disappears in the talus below Panther’s summit. The route up Panther will be along a SW-trending ridge to the summit view point. From there the return hike is via trail to Giant Ledge and back to the PA. Be prepared for biting insects, loose rocks and other stream scrambling hazards, thick forest, cliffy bits and Catskill yetis. Total Distance: ~7 miles.

Notice

Hiking, paddling, bike riding and other outdoor recreational activities are potentially dangerous and could result in injury or even death. This website provides information about recreation in the Catskill Region, but persons using this resource are responsible for anticipating possible dangers and appraising their physical ability.

Other Catskill Region Events

Don’t see a scheduled event that works for you? Try the schedules of these other Catskill area hiking clubs and organizations.

ripxsmallerRip Van Winkle Hikers  The Rip Van Winkle Hikers Club was organized in February 1991 “to promote and foster interest in the sport of hiking”. Hikes range from the more challenging to the purely scenic or historical, including in the Catskill high peaks and in the Hudson Valley.

 

C3500ClogoCatskill 3500 Club  The Catskill 3500 Club was founded in 1962 to foster interest in hiking in the Catskills. Membership is open to anyone who has climbed on foot each of the 35 Catskill peaks above 3500 feet in elevation. The club’s schedule appears in their newsletter, The Canister.

nynjtclogosmallNew York-New Jersey Trail Conference  The New York-New Jersey Trail Conference builds, maintains and protects 2,000 miles of trail in New York & New Jersey, including 29 lean-tos and over 200 miles of trails in the Catskills, by mobilizing volunteers. Learn more about Catskill programs and upcoming volunteer opportunities.

TCHC patchTriple Cities Hiking Club  The Binghamton based Triple Cities Hiking Club has been active since 1947 in promoting access to hiking opportunities. Hikes are scheduled on most weekends throughout the year and range in degree of challenge from easy outings to very strenuous hikes, including in the Catskills.

fltlogosmallerFinger Lakes Trail Conference  The FLTC was founded in 1962. It works in cooperation with its members and various organizations to develop and maintain a premier hiking trail system in New York. Learn more about the trail and find out how to help.

FatsintheCatsFats in the Cats Bicycle Club  The Fats in the Cats Bicycle Club, an IMBA Chapter, promotes cycling advocacy, trail building, trail maintenance and community service. Since 1994, the club has been advocating, stewarding and improving many of the best places to ride a mountain bike in New York’s Catskill Park and Hudson Valley Region. In addition, the club organizes group rides and gives away dozens of bikes to needy kids every holiday season.