Common Wildflowers of the Catskills

There are thousands of species of plants in the Catskills. As early as the mid-eighteenth century botanists and horticulturalists found and catalogued some of these plants. John Bartram collected seeds and plant specimens for study and export, introducing North American plants to Europe where they were sought by wealthy estate owners and botanical gardens. Here we have listed, with photographs, some of the wildflowers commonly found in the Catskills. They are arranged by season and color.

NOTE:  It is illegal to harvest or remove plants from the Catskill Forest Preserve.

NOTE:  This is an ongoing project. As the seasons progress, we’ll post additional information.

 

Spring Ephemerals and Other Early Bloomers

Jack-in-the-Pulpit

jack-in-the-pulpit_ar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bloodroot

bloodroot IMG_2382rcr_wg Bloodroot I_hr

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bunchberry

bunchberry IMG_1056rcr_wg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dwarf Ginseng

Dwarf Ginseng

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Foamflower

foamflower_arfoamflower IMG_3095rcr_wg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hepatica

Hepatica_hr

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Squirrel Corn

squirrel corn IMG_3069cr_wg squirrel corn IMG_3068rcr_wg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starflower

starflower IMG_0925rcr_wg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

White (Canada) Violet

white violet IMG_3081rcr_wgwhite violets_hr

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wood Anemone

wood anemone IMG_3063rcr_wg wood anemone IMG_3061rcr_wg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wood Sorrel

Wood Sorrel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dutchman’s Britches

Dutchman's Breeches IMG_3049rcr_wgDutchman's Britches

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trout Lily

trout lily IMG_3082rcr_wg trout lily IMG_3084rcr_wg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wild Oats

wild oats IMG_3075rcr_wg wild oats IMG_3073cr_wg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yellow Clintonia

yellow Clintonia IMG_1052rcr_wg yellow Clintonia IMG_0920rcr_wg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yellow Violet

yellow violet IMG_3072rcr_wg yellow violet IMG_0888rcr_wg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red Trillium

red trillium IMG_3057rcr_wg red trillium IMG_3053rcr_wg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Painted Trillium

painted trillium_gkpainted trillium IMG_3118rcr_wg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spring Beauties

spring beauties IMG_0875cr_wg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blue Cohosh

blue cohosh IMG_3056rcr_wg blue cohosh IMG_2390r_wg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blue Violet

blue violets IMG_0927rcr_wgBlue violet I_hr

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

False Hellebore – highly toxic

skunk cabbage (false hellebore) IMG_3059rcr_wg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ramps (Wild Leeks)

ramps (wild leeks) IMG_3054rcr_wg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wild Ginger

Wild Ginger_hr

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6 Comments

  1. Tammy
    Tammy May 21, 2014 at 3:40 pm . Reply

    I am helping to plan a Sept. 6th wedding in Bovina, NY. We would love to add naturally growing wildflowers that grow along the roads to the tables. Hoping we can find daisies, black-eyed Susan’s and other flowers. Do you think this will be possible at this time of year in this area? I really hope I get a response to this request!! Thanks from a Mom

    1. Ann Roberti
      Ann Roberti July 16, 2014 at 6:26 am . Reply

      Tammy, a friend of the Catskill Mountain Club who leads wildflower and invasive species hikes also does wildflower floral arrangements. You can check out her website here: http://www.mollyjmarquand.com

  2. NELL
    NELL September 8, 2015 at 1:52 pm . Reply

    Please help me to identify a flower blooming now beginning of September, small white flowers very much alike lily of the valley, but petals are a little festooned and smell is different. thank you

  3. Dimond
    Dimond January 19, 2016 at 12:46 pm . Reply

    awesome website

  4. dean carroll
    dean carroll August 22, 2016 at 3:39 pm . Reply

    My father went hiking in a place near Sunrise called “the Pink Forest; in the 1960’s. I can’t find any information about it. Can any one help? Thanks, Deano in Cincinnati, Dherbert53@aol.com.

  5. Sergio
    Sergio November 14, 2016 at 12:18 pm . Reply

    I am researching stuff about the catskill mountains for my class, and this was an awesome website!

Post Comment