Welcome to the Catskill Mountain Club

Looking up Kaaterskill Clove from Palenville Overlook with Indian Head in the foreground.

We are sorry to say that we will refrain from offering organized events until the COVID-19 crisis has passed.

There are great benefits of outdoor recreation to our individual and collective health. Besides the obvious physical health gains that are made with a regular exercise routine, the mental health benefits are well proven. They are especially important in times of high stress and limited social interaction.

We strongly encourage you and your loved ones to get outdoors for a hike, a bicycle ride or a walk as often as possible, while practicing social distancing and other safety measures.

As noted below, certain areas of the Catskills should not be used during this time of crisis.  Due to high use such as at Kaaterskill Falls or rugged terrain where injury requiring first responder assistance is more likely, hikers should make use of the hundreds of miles of trails in the Catskills region that are better suited to the times.  These trails traverse beautiful areas throughout the Catskill Park and similar areas on NYCDEP, Scenic Hudson, Woodstock Land Conservancy and State Park lands among others. The six trails built by the CMC are perfect examples of easy and moderate hikes in the region.

We all hope for a quick end to this international tragedy for the sake of humanity.  Until then we must all do our part to contribute to an early resolution.  Be safe and happy hiking.

Important things to know about recreating in the Catskills during the pandemic:

  • Avoid hiking the High Peaks unless you are hiking locally…read more

  • Graham and Doubletop Mountains are open to local hikers on a limited basis. Hikers must call the caretaker and receive permission…read more

  • Kaaterskill Falls, Fire Towers and Campgrounds have reopened with restrictions…read more

  • Usage of the Catskill Park and its facilities has grown tremendously during the pandemic.  This has resulted in an exponential increase is garbage being left behind by park visitors at high use areas like Kaaterskill Falls, Kaaterskill Clove and Colgate Lake.  In addition, parking regulations are strictly enforced.  Please be responsible and pack out what you pack into these beautiful natural environments.
  • How to hike safely now

  • There’s danger out in nature too – ticks are serious business …read more

 

 

Social Distancing and Other Safe Practices During the Covid Pandemic

Simple Rules to Help Everyone Stay Safe

  • Stay close to home.  Driving to distant sites increases the likelihood of spreading the disease.
  • Avoid high use areas or go at off times.
  • If the parking lot is full, visit a different location. For visitor safety and the safety of others, do not park on roadsides and only park in designated parking areas.
  • Keep a 6 foot distance between you and other hikers (except those in your household)
  • Alert others as you pass or step to the side to let other hikers pass.
  • If you are not feeling well, stay home.
  • Do not expect to use any bathroom or other facilities.
  • Do not share equipment except with members of your household.
  • Do not sign registers unless you use your own pen or sanitize your hands immediately afterwards. Backcountry hikers should be sure that they are prepared to register.
  • Do not share rides except with members of your household.
  • Leash your dogs and practice social distancing rules with them. There are reports that dogs and cats can get Covid-19 and transmit it to other members of their species.  Whether they can transmit it to humans in unknown at this time. It is known that they can get the virus from humans.
  • Practice tick prevention and check for ticks after your outing at all times. Tick borne diseases are always possible and can cause serious illness.

We are so grateful to all first responders, health care workers, grocery store, pharmacy workers and all other essential workers who are doing so much to keep us well and safe and fed throughout this difficult time.

Please show your appreciation by maintaining a six foot distance from others while shopping and by wearing a mask to help prevent the spread of the virus. The virus can be transmitted days before symptoms appear, as well as by asymptomatic people carrying the virus.

How the Pandemic is Affecting Our Annual Events

July, 3 2020

In keeping with recommendations and requirements intended to keep us all safe during the Covid-19 crisis, the CMC has decided that we will not offer our Annual Picnic nor our Annual Dinner in 2020.

We continue to evaluate the situation as we think about offering outdoor recreational events again.  At this time, the resurgence of cases in the country is of great concern.  It remains important to recreate locally, to socially distance when in groups and to wear masks when in close contact or when passing unrelated parties.  We recommend stepping off trail to allow others to pass.  We will continue to monitor developments. Like everyone, we look forward to resuming normal activities as soon as possible.

Be safe.

Ashokan Quarry Trail Opens to the Public

July 18, 2020

Yesterday we and our partners, the NYC Department of Environmental Protection, opened the new trail officially. Also in attendance was a representative from the Ashokan Watershed Stream Management Program, which supplied a grant to pay for interpretive signage. Unfortunately, in an abundance of caution we were not able to invite the public to the ceremony. While it’s always fun to have a big event, the important thing is that the trail is finished and that you are invited to hike it whenever you can!

The two mile trail begins just off Rte. 28A about 0.2 miles west of the Ashokan Reservoir Promenade. There is a dedicated parking area just 100 feet into the woods. From there follow the blue markers and yellow directional signs. Just before making the turn towards the top of the old Yale Quarry, a source of rock during the construction of the reservoir, pass the ruins of an old stone building that was used to store explosives. There are sweeping views of the Catskills, including four high peaks, from the high, open ledges along the top of the quarry wall. The path is through a mixed forest of hardwoods and pine, with a 200′ foot section passing through dense mountain laurel.

Be sure to check out the remnants of the railroad loading zone on a short spur trail near the southern end of the main loop trail. A large seasonal vernal pool fed by water falling from the quarry walls is an added point of interest in spring. Although It retains water year round, it becomes very low in summer. As you return to the parking lot, pass through an interesting area with large mounds of tailings that line both sides of the trail.

This is an easy hike with about 150 feet of elevation gain.
For more information and to print a map and trail guide visit:
https://catskillmountainclub.org/…/wh…/ashokan-quarry-trail/

Spring 2020 CMC Newsletter

The Spring edition of the CMC News is available here.  Check it out for stories about Earth Day, news about the Club and about recreational opportunities in the Catskills region.  Learn more about where to hike during the pandemic, about the signs of spring in nature and learn about a yoga exercise that will help you be a better hiker.

Spring 2020 Coronavirus Edition Newsletter

Find out what you need to know about current hiking conditions in the Catskills during the pandemic, tips for hiking safely at this time and more stories about the Catskills.  Click here to view the newsletter.

Announcing the Formation of the Friends of Bramley Mountain Fire Tower

Bramley Mountain Fire Tower and cabin c. 1950

The newly formed Friends of the Bramley Mountain Fire Tower group held its first meeting on the evening of January 6th at the O’Connor Hospital in Delhi. The Friends were formed to organize the reconstruction of the fire tower that was decommissioned by the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation in 1970 and removed in 1975. The tower was purchased by Pete Clark, who meticulously stored the tower’s parts right down to the nuts and bolts in his barn. It is well preserved as a result. Three years ago Tom Clark, the current owner, approached the Catskill Mountain Club with an offer to allow the tower to be restored if the CMC could lead the effort. With the formation of the Friends group, the effort to raise funds and complete the resurrection of the tower has officially begun.

In 2008 the NYC Department of Environmental Protection acquired the Bramley Mountain parcel and in 2016 the DEP allowed the Catskill Mountain Club to build a trail to the summit. The trail has been very popular with the public, drawing over 1500 hikers a year, some of them from as far away as Europe and Africa. Now, with the support and cooperation of the Town of Delhi and of the DEP as well as widespread support in Bovina, Hamden, Kortright, Andes and other local communities, the CMC has formed the Friends of the Bramley Mountain Fire Tower to move the project to completion.

For more information, to donate to the Friends, to volunteer and to sign up for the email contact list click here.

Delhi Town Council Supports the Bramley Mountain Fire Tower Project

Visitors at the Bramley Mountain Fire Tower, 1950s

Delhi Town Council Passes a Resolution in Support of the
Bramley Mountain Fire Tower Project

The Catskill Mountain Club is happy to announce that the Town of Delhi has passed a resolution in support of the CMC’s efforts to restore the Bramley Mountain Fire Tower to its former home on the mountain’s summit, overlooking vast areas of the Catskills. The tower, originally raised in 1950, was decommissioned and then removed by the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation in 1975. At that time, the Clark family of Delhi bought the tower, removed it, and has stored it in a barn since then, well protected from the elements. We are grateful to the Clarks for their generous offer to lease the tower to the Town for $1 so it can be placed on the summit again. This is an exciting development that will provide a great new recreational destination in the western Catskills and benefit the communities of Delhi and Bovina with the business of the many hikers who will visit the tower.

Continue reading

News about the CMC in the Oneonta Daily Star

The CMC was featured in the Oneonta Daily Star recently.  We are grateful for the recognition of our work on behalf of outdoors enthusiasts and of the communities of the Catskills that benefit from the great recreational assets of our region.

Oneonta Daily Star

Go take a hike

Catskill Mountain Club’s trails encourage folks to get outdoors

Go take a hike

Photo contributed by the CMC – The Pepacton Reservoir as seen from the  Shavertown Trail.

 

The Catskills All Trails Challenge Gets a Facebook Group

April 24, 2019    With the growing interest in the Catskills All Trails Challenge (CATC), we have created a Facebook group dedicated to the folks who are hiking the Challenge. The page gives you a place to connect with one another, share information and advice about the trails, ask questions, make plans, share routes, find hiking and carpooling partners and post pictures and descriptions of your adventures on the trails of the Catskill Park.

Anyone who has hiked or is interested in hiking the All Trails Challenge is welcome to join the group.  You’ll need a Facebook account to join.  Simply go to the following link and ask to join. Catskills All Trails Challenge on Facebook.

We welcome all hikers who share our values of good stewardship of the Catskill Park. We endorse Leave No Trace principles and compliance with the rules and regulations written by the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation in order to protect the Catskill Forest Preserve, which was created to protect these lands as “Forever Wild” by an Amendment to the New York State Constitution.  These regulations include limited hiking group sizes, with a legal limit of 20 without a special permit.  We suggest a limit of 12 to limit impacts on sensitive and endangered plant communities, and to preserve the quality of the wilderness experience.  For more, visit our page Recreational Use Regulations for the Catskill Park Forest Preserve.

Catskill Park Day | Tuesday, February 5, 2019

NYS Capitol in winter_commonsimageTwo weeks from tomorrow on Tuesday, February 5th the CMC and our many partners in the Catskill Park Coalition will head up to Albany on Catskill Park Day. Our purpose is to talk to legislators, the governor and officials at the DEC about the recreational needs of our region, including stewardship of the Catskill Park, aid to our communities, protection of our environment, conservation and many other things that impact on the health and quality of our area’s great outdoor spaces.

Click here for a summary of our goals and how you can help advance them, even if you can’t go to Albany. Find the contact info for your legislators and for the Governor and give them a call or write a letter supporting our requests. And please join us on February 5th as we make our case to our state’s leaders. Thanks in advance for helping to protect and improve the Catskill Park!

For more info, contact us at wendell@catskillmountianclub.org.
Register to go, get contact info and find a sample letter here.
Follow on Facebook here.

Final+2019+Catskill+Park+Coalition+Priorities
Download a copy here:

Final+2019+Catskill+Park+Coalition+Priorities

Regular Big Game Hunting Season Begins Soon – Hike Safely at These No Hunting Locations

Beginning November 17th and lasting through December 9th, the popular regular deer and bear hunting season means that everyone who goes into the woods in the Catskills needs to be aware, be alert and ALWAYS BE DRESSED IN ORANGE (dogs included). Whether you are on forest preserve, state forest or NYCDEP lands, the three week period during which hunters are permitted to use rifles is a time for added care.

Alternatives where hunting is not permitted do exist. Most are not within the Catskills proper, but all are close enough to make a day trip practical. It is advisable to wear orange even when hiking on these trails. The added precaution affords peace of mind.
Listed below are 16 great places to get outdoors where hunting is not permitted. We suggest that you consider exploring new territory or revisiting your favorites. Happy Trails!

Andes Rail Trail/Bullet Hole Spur (in Andes)
Bear Mountain State Park (near West Point)
Black Creek Preserve (near Esopus)
Delhi Trails (in Delhi)

Ferncliff Forest & Fire Tower (Rhinebeck)
Harriman State Park (near Harriman)
High Banks Preserve (near Ulster Park)
Highland Lakes State Park (near Middletown)
Mills-Norrie State Park (near Staatsburg)
Minnewaska State Park Preserve* (near New Paltz)
Riddell State Park (near Laurens/Oneonta)

Thacher State Park** (near Voorheesville)
The Willows at Brandow’s Point (Athens)
Wallkill Valley Rail Trail (Kingston to Gardiner)
Walkway Over the Hudson & 
Franny Reese State Park (can be combined) (Poughkeepsie/Highland)

The North-South Lake Day Use Area is one place in the Catskill Park where hunting is not permitted. Be aware that the area does not include Kaaterskill Falls or the Escarpment Trail to the south of the intensive use area. It does extend on all trails north to Badman Cave.

*No bear season. For deer seasons, no hunting in the vicinity of hiking trails – check map here: https://parks.ny.gov/parks/attachments/Minnewaska2017HuntingMapMinnewaska.pdf?fbclid=IwAR0c-LusE0CwKNafcBrJidoc2K73nagbtsEll1HXmv4a3iyKKLo-aSllsJY

**hunting allowed in a some areas. See map for details: https://parks.ny.gov/…/ThacherThacherStateParkHuntingMap.pdf

The First Annual CMC Picnic was a Perfect Way to Spent a Beautiful Summer’s Day!

We had a great day for the first Annual CMC Picnic yesterday. The weather quickly warmed up and the skies stayed sunny for most of the day, making for a great day to swim or just sit at the beach. We all agreed that Belleayre Beach was a perfect place to get together. The grounds are beautiful, the facilities well kept and the lake and surrounding mountains are a great setting. We had some good corn hole and bocce ball matches, and a great hike at Rochester Hollow to begin the day. With Rick Roberts, CMC president, at the grill, the burgers and hotdogs were excellent eating with lots of great homemade side dishes and plenty of desserts to top it all off.

With great company, it was a nice way to spend a summer’s day. We hope to see many more of you at next year’s festivities!

Accessible Outdoor Recreation Destinations in and around the Catskills

IMG_4215

Accessible Trail at Little Pond Campground

Most of us take for granted the almost endless opportunities we have to get out into the great outdoors. Whether we’re hitting the trail, casting for trout, paddling, or going rogue by ‘whacking our way into the unknown, we know well how important that chance to connect with nature is. And we appreciate it deeply.

For some of us, getting that feeling isn’t so easy. Our friends and family members who have limited mobility need and deserve resources that can accommodate them so they can get out and experience that connection with nature, too. The Americans with Disabilities Act has encouraged the development of infrastructure to make getting out easier. The NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, the NYC Department of Environmental Protection, other governmental agencies and even some non-governmental organizations have accessible facilities all around the Catskills, including trails, fishing areas, water access points, picnic pads, camping pads, pavilions and restrooms. Recent improvements have been completed at Kenneth Wilson Campground, a DEC facility in the Town of Woodstock and the DEC has filed notice for comments on a plan to improve and add to the accessible facilities at the North-South Lake Campground near Haines Falls. Accessible attractions also include iconic spots like Kaaterskill Falls and the Ashokan Reservoir Promenade. For travelers, easy to get to trails and other amenities can be found at the Catskill Interpretive Center in Mt. Tremper.

Here are links to pages that list where many of these facilities are located.

NYSDEC Accessible Recreation Destinations listed by county.

Accessible Catskills Hiking, Camping and Outdoors

NYS Parks – search by the park name or location and look for the “Amenities and Activities” section.

Boot-brush Unveiling and Hike at the Shavertown Trail | Friday, July 13, 10:30 AM

DEP logo

DEP TO UNVEIL BOOT BRUSH STATION AND HOST COMMUNITY HIKE AT SHAVERTOWN TRAIL IN DELAWARE COUNTY

Boot brush, designed to combat invasive species, is among the first in the Catskills

DEP will also co-host community hike at Shavertown on July 13 with Catskill Mountain Club

The New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) will co-host a community hike and unveil its new boot-brush station at the Shavertown Trail near Pepacton Reservoir on July 13. The event, which is free and open to all, will begin at 10:30 a.m. The Catskill Mountain Club and DEP will lead the hike, which will take participants along a new section of the trail that was recently constructed by volunteers.

The event will begin at the trailhead on County Route 1 in Andes, just north of its intersection with Route 30. DEP this month installed a boot-brush station at the trailhead to help minimize the spread of invasive species. The station is among the first of its kind in the Catskills. It includes a mounted brush on which hikers can clean their boots, information to help identify several invasive species that are approaching the region, and a gravel pad that is intended to trap any seeds that might get brushed off.

The boot-brush station will help prevent the spread of many types of invasive species, especially invasive plants such as bittersweet and barberry. Invasive plants cannot move far on their own. Even wind-dispersed seeds generally do not blow too far. Most new infestations are started by people who unintentionally move the seeds through recreational activities such as hiking, hunting or fishing. That’s why boot-brush stations are becoming more common throughout New York, especially in the northern and western parts of the state where outdoor recreation is popular. Continue reading

Catskills All Trails Challenge: Adding the New Overlook Mountain Trails

There are two recent additions to the trail system on Overlook Mountain. The Meads Meadow Trail and the Overloop Trail provide new easy to moderate hikes that loop north off the Overlook Spur Trail, which has been extended to the new Meads Meadow Trailhead parking area. Together they add 1.8 miles of new trails. Going forward, those trails are being added to the list of trails that must be hiked in order to complete the All Trails Challenge requirements. With their inclusion their are now 347 miles of designated hiking trails that must be hiked to receive your cetificate, patch and shirt. More Happy Hiking!

Overlook Mountain Wild Forest map.

Andes Rail Trail Gets Some Big Improvements

April 10, 2018

IMG_5326Parking has always been a bit tricky for visitors to the Andes Rail Trail and Bullet Hole Spur, but no longer. There has been a great improvement to the parking situation thanks to the Town of Andes, landscaper Mel Bellar and CMC board member Ann Roberti. The entrance to the Trail and to the historic train station has been opened up and improved so that parking is now available adjacent to the trailhead. The trailhead itself has a newly redesignedIMG_5323 entrance. The parking area was paved with crushed stone by LaFever Excavating. While there, they generously donated work to improve a long existing drainage problem on the trail. The CMC thanks all those involved in these projects for a great job.

Volunteer with the CMC! You’ll Love It (and so will We).

CMC_logo_border_220x220Do You Have Some Time to Spare? Love to Pitch in on a Community Project? Looking for a Good Excuse to Get Out of the House (and Into the Woods)? We’ve Got You Covered!

We admit it. We’ve got big eyes. We look around at all of the great things happening in the Catskills and we want to jump into the action. But, alas, we could use lots more help. Here’s what’s coming up. See something that appeals? Just get in touch with us and we’ll tell you how you can help.

Continue reading

Read All About It in the The CMC’s Winter 2018 Newsletter

CMCpatchStuckis

Yours free with membership. Or buy it for $5.

Winter 2018 Newsletter

Have you come home from a winter hike to find that a tick has attached itself to you!? Maybe you’ve been out on a little adventure on the trails and found yourself on your butt more times than you care to remember. Read our review of traction devices and you’ll soon be prepared for another, safer outing. These articles and much more are yours to read by clicking here. Subscribe to our mailing list to get future newsletters and CMC updates in your mailbox automatically. Just give us your name, email address and mailing address and you’ll be kept informed about CMC happenings. We promise not to flood your inbox.

Of course, our favorite option would be that you become a CMC member. Our modest membership dues are what we rely on to make the wheels go ’round. And you get some nice perks with your annual membership. Check it out. Thanks.

Catskills All Trails Challenge: De-listing the Jockey Hill Trails

After careful consideration, the CMC has decided to de-list the Jockey Hill Trails as a hike required to qualify for the Catskills All Trails Challenge certificate of completion.

Like the Elm Ridge trails in Greene County, which were never listed as required hikes, Jockey Hill trails are multi-purpose and are designed with the needs of mountain biking users in mind. The Department of Environmental Conservation has indicated that the trail system at Jockey Hill will be expanded to serve those needs. These additions further change the hiking experience through the design of trails that form multiple loops. Similar improvements have been made at Elm Ridge, and the CMC applauds the decision of the DEC to expand mountain biking opportunities in the Catskill Park. However, such trails are not conducive to a satisfying hiking experience.

To those who have already hiked Jockey Hill in its current configuration, we say congratulations. We hope you enjoyed your explorations there. Feedback from some CATs hikers, along with consultation with the DEC about the expanded system have informed our decision. Of course, any hiker is more than welcome to explore both Jockey Hill and Elm Ridge. Until the current supply of CATs Challenge tee shirts runs out, Jockey Hill will continue to be listed on the shirt. It will be removed from the published list of required hikes.

As this development illustrates, the trail system in the Catskill Park in dynamic. New trails are sometimes added and old trails are sometimes rerouted or abandoned. We appreciate input from our members and friends and look forward to hearing from you as you continue the quest. Thanks for participating and for spreading the word about the Catskills All Trails Challenge and the wonderful trails and features that are discovered with each hike!

Catskill Park Day 2018: A Call to Action

CPC graphic

 

In only a few days the CMC and its Catskill Park Coalition partners will go to Albany for our annual Catskill Park Day. We’ll meet with our elected representatives, including the Governor and members of the legislature, to press for action on the policy priorities we have identified for 2018.

If you are not able to travel with us to Albany for Catskill Park Day, there’s a way to speak up and speak out right from the comfort of your home or office. By raising your voice, you amplify our message and add power to its effectiveness.

You can either send Governor Cuomo a brief letter of support for the priorities of the Catskill Mountain Club and its Catskill Park Coalition partners, or you can call the Governor’s office and give a brief message of support.

Catskill Park Coalition - Budget Priorities 2018 (Final)

Click to enlarge

Below are the specific requests made by the CPC for 2018. Simply glance at them, pick one or two that resonates with you and place your call telling the assistant who answers what you would like the Governor to support.

If you prefer to write a note, we have provided a link to the form used by the Governor’s office. You can simply copy and paste the message we have written below or edit it to suit your preferences.

We have had good results over the past several years and anticipate continued success with support from folks like you who love the Catskills and care about its future.

Thank you for your efforts!

Phone number of the Governor’s office: (518) 474-8390   Office hours: 9:00am to 5:00pm

Link to the Governor’s email system: https://www.governor.ny.gov/content/governor-contact-form

Sample letter:

Dear Governor Cuomo,

I am writing today to respectfully ask that you give your support to the priorities for the Catskill Park and region as expressed by the Catskill Mountain Club and its fellow members of the Catskill Park Coalition.

The Catskill Park is one of our nation’s great natural assets, encompassing hundreds of thousands of acres of pristine wilderness and sparkling clean waters. It is home to huge communities of rare wildlife and to one of the most diverse forests in the world. And it is one of New York’s greatest outdoor recreational areas, along with the Adirondack Park.

Please support the continuing improvements to the Catskills environment and Park infrastructure that allow members of the public to experience the great outdoors in all its glory in a way that is both safe and sustainable.

Sincerely,

Overlook Mountain: New Parking Area and Trail Will Relieve a Big Problem

Overlook Mountain new parking & trailsDecember 19, 2017

The DEC opened the new Meads Meadow Trailhead parking area on McDaniel Rd. today. A new trail system explores the Magic Meadow parcel, and the new connector trail leads to the existing trail to the summit and fire tower.

Severe overuse has long plagued hikers with parking problems that resulted in dangerous conditions on the road for hikers and drivers alike. A downloadable map is available on the CMC website here: Overlook Mountain new parking & trails.

New: Catskills Trail Conditions Reports from the Catskill Interpretive Center

The Catskill Interpretive Center has added a very valuable service for visitors who hike in the Catskills. The weekly updated trail condition reports offer vital news about all sorts of hazards and problems that hikers might encounter. Things like washouts, trail obstructions, weather related conditions and other related info can be found in one convenient spot. Check out the CMC Facebook page on Thursdays for a link to the new reports, or visit the Catskill Interpretive Center’s trail conditions webpage.

The CMC is an operating partner of the Catskill Interpretive Center. To support out work there, please consider donating to or joining the CMC. Thank you.

We have a new “Wildflowers of the Catskills” page!

Visit our newly expanded page covering Wildflowers of the Catskills.

We now list over 130 species and cover the seasons from early spring through fall. With Spring arriving and a new year of blooms on the way, what better way to enjoy them than to get prepared by familiarizing yourself with them? Our page is set up for quick reference and it focusses on the flowers you will see right here in the Catskills! Check it out.

HIGHLIGHTS OF CMC’S 2016 SEASON

STEWARDSHIP– The CMC annually maintains five CMC trails totaling 20 miles and seven DEC trails totaling nearly 25 miles. In 2016, 36 trail maintenance hikes were conducted totaling 750 volunteer hours, all headed by the Club’s VP , Wendell George.

TRAIL BUILDING– Since 2011, the CMC has built 5 new hiking trails on lands owned by NYC DEP as well as Delaware Academy. The newest trail, that to the former fire tower on Bramley Mountain near Delhi NY, was opened on July 29th . The opening ceremony was attended by nearly 40 hiking enthusiasts, local, state and City officials and followed by a hike to the summit.
The five CMC trails have been very popular since their openings. Over the past year nearly 5600 hikers have signed-in on these trails. Approximate counts by trail are:

  • Delhi Trails – over 1000 visitors in 2016
  • Palmer Hill Trails – 1300 in the last year
  • Shavertown Trail – 1200 in the last year.
  • Andes Rail Trail & Bullet Hole Spur- 1500 in the last year
  • Bramley Mountain Trails – 600 hikers from opening day thru December

This year the CMC produced a brochure/map highlighting these five trails. The brochure is being distributed at all CMC trailheads as well as various informational kiosks and at the Catskill Interpretive Center in Mt. Tremper. The maps of the five CMC trails can also be viewed on our website from the Where to Go menu.

CMC EVENTS– CMC members led over 40 Hikes, paddles and other CMC events in 2016 that were enjoyed by 400+ participants. In addition CMC members are leading over 25 events for this year’s Catskill Lark in the Park. Upcoming hikes and other CMC events can be viewed on the CMC website at Upcoming Events.

ADVOCACY – The CMC is involved with several organizations advocating for outdoor recreational concerns affecting the Catskill area.
The Catskill Park Coalition is a partnership of many Catskill organizations, all concerned with outdoor recreation and related public land concerns. Each February the Coalition members travel to Albany for Catskill Park Awareness Day, advocating for increased funding for outdoor recreation, conservation and tourism related issues. In 2016 the Coalition succeeded in obtaining $500,000 dedicated for use within the Catskill Park. Part of this allocation is being used for the creation of a new comprehensive recreation plan as well as various infrastructure improvements. In addition, the continuation of the NYS Ranger Academy was stressed as well as the hiring of 2 assistant Forest Rangers, both which were granted. Also, $994,000 was asked for and allocated for the Catskill Interpretative Center, which opened on NYS Rte 28 in Mt. Tremper in July of 2015. The funding will allow for the building of a full scale old style fire tower, a fire warden’s cabin, a picnic pavilion, an amphitheater and new road side signage.
Information on the 2017 Awareness Day can be viewed at catskillcenter.org/awareness-day/.

The Catskill Park Advisory Committee –  The Committee is a group of local government representatives, agencies and  area organizations representing the various communities and user groups of the Catskill Park and the Catskill Watershed. The purpose of the Committee is to provide assistance, advice and guidance to the NYSDEC, the New York City Department of Environmental Protection and other land managers in the management of the New York State Forest Preserve, the Catskill Park and the Catskill Watershed. The CMC is a charter member of this Committee and meets with it on a quarterly basis.

STAFFING of the Maurice Hinchey Catskill Interpretitive Center (CIC) – The CMC is one of five operating partners for the CIC and provides part of the volunteer staff operating the center 363 days a year. In all,  CMC members volunteered over 600 hours for its operation in 2016. The CIC opened in July, 2015. catskillinterpretivecenter.org.

CMC DONATIONS –  $1000 to Summit Stewards Program – Summit Stewards patrol the summit areas of Giant Ledge/Panther, Slide, Wittenberg, and Cornell mountains during the summer hiking period. They work closely with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, and address the unique concerns of these peaks to the hikers they encounter. See Summit Stewards.

$1000 to the Catskill Interpretive Center – The CIC is the Catskills Tourist Information Center.

LARK IN THE PARK 2016– Last year was the 12th annual Lark in the Park and featured 50 separate events over 10 days from October 3rd to the 12th and was enjoyed for nearly 750 attendees. For this year’s 2016 program we had 60 events , many being held by 19 Catskill Based organizations such as Mountain Keeper, Catskill Rec. Center, Trout Unlimited and the 3500 Club. The CMC has been the main driving force of this annual event celebrating the creation of the Catskill Park. CMC members have spent over 200 man hours, planning and leading events. See catskilsllark.org.

CATSKILL ALL TRAILS CHALLENGE– In 2014 the CMC created this unique opportunity for hikers
to receive recognition for the hiking of all 87 trails and 350 miles of Catskill Park Trails. This year we
had 15 hikers complete the Challenge bringing the total to 32. For more on the Challenge go to
https://catskillmountainclub.org/events/the-all-trails-hiking-challenge-redlining-the-catskills.

SOCIAL MEDIA– The Board of Directors of the CMC sees the use of the various social media platforms as vital for the future dissemination of CMC information, news, advocacy issues as well as trail conditions and hiker safety concerns. The CMC currently uses FaceBook for communicating with CMC members.

CMC BOARD OF DIRECTORS– The CMC Board meets every other month in Arkville, NY to discuss Club business, outdoor recreational issues, interface with other Catskill organizations and governments entities, plan events and review financial concerns During 2016 the all volunteer Directors spent on over 2000 man hours on club business.

$500,000 in Newly Released Funding Announced for a Catskills Comprehensive Recreation Plan and More

November 3, 2016   The Catskill Park Coalition, of which the CMC is a founding member, has successfully lobbied Albany for funds to support the Catskills since its founding four years ago. $500,000 has just been released for a variety of projects that will improve planning and public access. Read about the CPC’s latest success in this Watershed Post article. We will be in Albany again this February with our Coalition partners to speak to our government leaders about the needs of the Catskill Park and the region.

 

SUNY Delhi Students Work to Maintain Trails in the Western Catskills

img_0566On October 26 a group of SUNY Delhi students, led by Professor David DeForest of the Division of Applied Science and Recreation, maintained sections of the Mary Smith Trail and the Pelnor Hollow Trail from Berry Brook Road to Split Rock. The group cleared several blowdowns and lots of blackberries, etc. that had grown into the trail, making this area difficult to pass through.

The CMC would like to thank all participants for coming out on a chilly day and showing some love for the path to the spectacular Split Rock view.

DEC Announces Start of Early Bear Hunting Season – Sept. 10-25

In southeastern New York, including the Catskills, the early bear season runs from September 10 – 25. The early bowhunting season for bears will open in the entire Southern Zone on October 1, followed by the regular firearms season beginning November 19.

For more about hunting in New York visit http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/7857.html

CMC Receives the 2016 Alf Evers Award for Excellence

We are very pleased and proud to have received the prestigious 2016 Alf Evers Award for Excellence from the good folks at the Catskill Center. The presentation occurred during the Annual Summer Gathering at the Catskill Center’s offices in Arkville, NY.
As an organization that greatly values cooperation and collaboration, we salute the Catskill Center for its continuing leadership in our region, and we thank them for recognizing the CMC for playing a constructive role in the work at hand.

Following are remarks made by Catskill Center Executive Director Jeff Senterman at the presentation.

The Alf Evers Award for Excellence from the Catskill Center is presented to an individual or organization for their distinguished service to the Catskill region.

We are blessed in the Catskills to have so many individuals and groups who
• work hard to be stewards of our natural resources
• educate visitors about the proper use of the great outdoors
• and who have a sense of community spirit to improve our region.

One such group is the Catskill Mountain Club.

Founded in 2004 on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the creation of the Catskill Park.

The early Catskill Mountain Club, which included many Catskill Center staff grew and evolved since it’s founding to become committed to efforts to ensure sustainable and safe outdoor recreation on public lands throughout the Catskill region.

Today the Catskill Mountain Club strives to raise public awareness and appreciation of the Catskill region, something they rightly describe as “America’s First Wilderness”

The Catskill Mountain Club offer dozens of guided hikes, paddles, snow shoe excursions, bike trips and more all over the Catskills.

Offering visitors and residents amazing opportunities to get out and experience all that our Catskill Mountains have to offer.

But the Catskill Mountain Club isn’t only taking advantage of our region’s vast outdoor recreation resources, they are doing something to help ensure they are available for generations to come!

The Catskill Mountain Club stresses and promotes volunteer stewardship of our Catskill Park and public lands by getting their hands dirty!

They have constructed five new trails in the Catskills over the last four years – an amazing accomplishment, especially when considering at least some of those trails have been on New York City Department of Environmental Protection lands!

Those five trails…
• The Andes Rail Trail
• The Delhi Trails
• The Palmer Hill Trail
• The Shavertown Trail
• And most recently
• The Bramley Mountain Trail

Representing almost 20 miles of new trails, the Catskill Mountain Club is offering the public more options and leading the way on opening DEP lands for public recreation!

When not building trail, the Catskill Mountain Club maintains miles of hiking trails throughout the Catskill Park for the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation

They offer workshops and take part in events that highlight
• The natural and human histories of the Catskills,
• The issues that are affecting the health and preservation of the Catskills
• And teach the skills that are needed to safely enjoy our great outdoors!

They join with others of the Catskill Park Coalition to knock on doors in Albany, helping to ensure that the Catskill Park is represented and receives ongoing support.

Members of the Catskill Mountain Club even find time to help staff the Catskill Interpretive Center where their expertise on everything outdoors comes in handy to educate visitors to the Park!

All this and the Catskill Mountain Club is an all-volunteer grass roots led organization – SIMPLY AMAZING!

The Catskill Mountain Club is helping to lead the way towards a sustainable outdoor recreation based economy that while utilizes our vast and beautiful open spaces, while teaching our visitors and park users the value of the region and how to protect it for posterity

As a former member of the Catskill Mountain Club’s Board of Directors, I am truly honored and humbled to have had the chance to be part of this amazing organization and the amount of work that that the members of this organization have put in since my time is astounding!

For their work
• Protecting our natural resources
• Raising awareness and appreciation of our Catskills
• Leading activities across the public lands of our region
• Working with DEP to increase public access to watershed lands
• Building almost 20 miles of new trails
• Maintaining miles of Catskill Park hiking trails and
• Staffing the Catskill Interpretive Center

And most importantly for their love of the Catskills and their ability to protect and preserve the region

I am pleased to present the Alf Evers Award for Excellence to the Catskill Mountain Club in recognition of their leadership in creating and expanding opportunities for the public to enjoy and understand the unique beauty and remarkable nature of our Catskill region.

They have made a true impact across the region and it gives me great joy to present this award to
• Rick Roberts, the President of the Catskill Mountain Club
• Wendell George, the Vice-President of the Catskill Mountain Club
• And all members of the Catskill Mountain Club

THANK YOU from the Catskill Center and from the Catskills!

Announcing Our New Trails Brochure!

TrailsBrochurecoverTo celebrate the opening of our fifth trail this past Friday, located on Bramley Mountain, we have published a brochure called “A Guide to the Trails” that provides a map and description of each trail. The full color brochure will be available at each trailhead, at several village kiosks, at the Catskill Interpretive Center and at other locations that distribute tourism information.

With the guide, you’ll be able to hike each of our trails with confidence. The trail maps show contours at 20′ intervals, show notable features and indicate where trailheads are located, making it easy to find your way. Pick one up and keep it in your car or with your pack. You’ll always be prepared!

You can also download our trail maps to your iPhone or Android device for free. Look for links to the Avenza App and directions for how to get the maps in the Where To Go menu on this site.

Bramley Mountain Trail Opens

Bramleyopening8July 30, 2016

On July 29 the CMC’s newly constructed hiking trail on Bramley Mountain in the Towns of Delhi and Bovina officially opened to the public. Built on NYC DEP lands, the 4 mile trail is open year round.
The ceremony began with comments by DEP Deputy Commissioner Paul Rush, Delaware County Chamber of Commerce President Ray Pucci and CMC President Rick Roberts. Each spoke about the importance of DEP’s efforts to open its lands to public recreational use. Among the benefits of greater access are increased options for a range of low impact outdoor activities, economic growth due to increased visitorship and improved health for community members due to the proximity of attractive recreational options.
Following the ribbon cutting, the laBramleyopening5rge crowd headed off for the inaugural hike. Some participants chose to take the easy hike to the quarry and then return to the parking area, while others continued up the trail. After we reached the summit and enjoyed the views we took a little break for lunch or a snack, only to be surprised by a brief shower that chased us off the top. As we descended, we ate raspberries growing beside the trail and noticed that the blackberries will be rippening soon. There are tons of them, so we’ll be back for the feast in a few weeks.
Bramleyopening1The Bramley Mountain Trail is one of five that the CMC has built over the last five years. To celebrate that work and for the convenience of hikers, we’ve published a brochure that provides a map and describes each of them. Look for it at the trail registers, in visitor information sites in the villages and at the Catskill Interpretive Center on State Route 28 in Mt. Tremper.
Click here for WBNG News coverage:
  http://www.wbng.com/news/local/A-new-hiking-trail-opens-at-Bramley-Mountain–388708722.html?vid=a

The Bramley Mountain Trail is Set to Open on JULY 29 at 12:00 PM

We are thrilled to announce, along with the NYC DEP, that the new Bramley Mountain Trail will be officially opened to the public on July 29 at Noon. The CMC designed and built the trail, our third in partnership with the DEP. There will be a brief ceremony followed by a guided hike. The event is free and DEP permits are not required to hike on this parcel.untitled-59
The trail is on a 1243 acre parcel and summits the mountain at 2817′, one of the two westernmost 2800+ foot peaks in the Catskills. Bramley was once the site of a fire tower. The spectacular views from the summit ledges take in parts of the southern high peaks, Mount Pisgah and the mountains traversed by the Finger Lakes Trail. A short hike west is a view over the northwestern foothills and the farms that occupy them. Other features of the hike include a significant abandoned bluestone quarry, a small pond, numerous stone walls and foundations, and the fabulous cliffs and caves that lie between the quarry and the summit.
untitled-67We invite you to come join the fun on this special day. If you can’t, the trail is open year round. The trailhead is located on Glen Burnie Rd., about 0.7 miles south of CR 18 in Delhi.

Congratulations to the Four New CATs Challenge Qualifiers

National Trails Day – June 4th, 2016

IMG_3258_WGThe CMC is happy to announce on this National Trails Day that four more hikers have recently completed the Catskills All Trails Challenge! Congratulations to Johnny Witter (#20), Richard Williams (#21), Brian Bacher (#22) and Michele Corn Farrell (#23).
It’s good to have a special day to celebrate hiking trails all across our land. It’s better to get out and hike them with dedication and love, as these four did when covering every foot of the 350 miles of hiking trails located in the Catskill Park!
As Michele put it, “Thank you for coming up with a patch and challenge to redline the Catskill Mountains. Without this I would have never discovered so many great remote and amazingly beautiful locations…..we would have whole days and sometimes a backpacking overnight filled with hours of mud, snow, rain, sweat, painful uphills, scrapes from over grown prickers, backtracking for little half-miles previously missed, silly circles to make sure every inch of trail was accounted for and thousands of hours of joy and laughter.” Now, that’s what it’s all about!

Lucky Rescue on the Pepacton Leaves Victim Chipper

swimming chippy rBoaters at the CMC’s season opening May 28 chippy on bow rPaddle the Pepacton event rescued a chipmunk found struggling far from shore in the cold reservoir waters. We’ve seen beavers, deer, bears and other four-legged bathers in the past, but never before a chipmunk.

 

After picking the chippy out of the water, the rescuers paddled to shore with it sitting on the bow of a kayak as it watched the land approach. As soon as they were within jumping distance, the chipmunk leapt and scampered off into the woods, safe and dry.

chippy ready to jump rchippy on shore r

 

 

 

 

One can only the amazed that it managed to avoid being eaten by one of the many bald eagles or huge trout that call the Pepacton home. Now that’s a lucky day!

A Great Day Working on the Porcupine Caves Trail

Friday, May 27, 2016

IMG_0679Eight volunteers came out on a nice day yesterday to work on the new Bramley Mountain Trails. We put in about 40 hours of work collectively, cleaning the entire Porcupine Caves Trail of leaves, loose rocks, limbs and any remaining woody plants that were in the path. We did some sidehilling, built stairs and placed steps in potentially wet areas, too.  We also installed the roof on the trailhead kiosk. Our work is nearing completion and we’ll have a weekend work trip soon. As always, we welcome your help.IMG_0685

 

 

 

Special thanks to Kathy Mario, Don Harris, John Exter, Jeff Ditchek, Elda Stifani, Bob Moses, and Rick Roberts for coming out to lend a hand!

We’re getting excited about the upcoming official opening of the trails. Please look for more information regularly and join us for the ceremony and inaugural hike!

 

Invasive Species Workshops Prepare Volunteers for the Battle to Save Catskill Forests

iMapMobile_iPhone_webCRISP logoOn May 14 and then again on May 21 the CMC and several partners, including the Catskills Regional Invasive Species Partnership (CRISP), sponsored events at the Maurice D. Hinchey Catskill Interpretive Center that addressed the problem of two invasive insect species that are causing severe damage to Catskills forests. The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) and the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (HWA) are spreading rapidly and causing the deaths of thousands of two of the most important tree species in the Catskills. The impacts, especially those from the loss of hemlocks, will be widespread and could fundamentally alter our ecosystem, affecting not only the forest and its inhabitants, but also our streams, our fish and other aquatic wildlife, and our water quality. Indeed, some impacts to the forests are already obvious to even casual observers.

Many thanks to our presenters, Mark Whitmore of Cornell University, Jennifer Dean of the NY Natural Heritage Program and Dan Snider of CRISP for there insights and dedication. And thanks to all who attended for their concern and commitment to the task at hand.

For those who were unable to attend these events, training in recognition, assessment and reporting is available through the NY Natural Heritage Program’s iMapInvasives project and from CRISP. For more information please visit these websites.

Saturday, May 14, 1 PM | The Impending Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Disaster and How to Stop It

HWA at Willow point 4 small

Hemlock tree under attack

For some years now, Hemlock Woolly Adelgid has been spreading through the forests of the eastern United States, including here in the Catskills. This tiny invasive insect attaches to the underside of hemlock needles and feasts on the plants vital fluids, resulting in the eventual death of the tree.

We here in the Catskills have the opportunity to stop HWA before it completely devastates our vast hemlock forests. Some other regions no longer have that option. In the Great Smokey Mountains the mortality has turned hills and valleys a deathly grey-brown, upending centuries of ecological balance and leaving huge vistas comprised of skeletal trees. If we fail to act here in the Catskills, our forests will share that fate.

HWA damage

HWA damage in the Great Smokey Mountains

Fortunately, New York is waking up to this possibility. Dedicated foresters, botanists and invasive species specialists are mobilizing to stop the attacks on living trees while they can be saved and stopping the spread on HWA in its tracks. But this is no small task as the hemlock is one of the foundational species of the Catskills, as well as of other areas in New York such as the Adirondacks. The battle requires the commitment of financial resources, and that seems to be beginning, though not nearly enough and too slowly still.

For outdoor enthusiasts, whether hikers, fishermen and women, hunters, birders and all others who venture into the woods, there is an important role to play. With sharp eyes and a little knowledge we can help to identify both existing and potentailly infected stands and report the conditions in those stands. In that way, we help make it possible for the professionals to work more efficiently and effectively. We can also let it be known to our elected officials that this fight is a high priority for us, and that we want their attention and support. Indeed, the Catskill Park Coalition (of which the CMC is a founding member) has taken the message to Albany. You can amplify that voice by contacting your legislators and the governor.

HWA adult

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid adult

On Saturday, May 14th at 1 PM a lecture and workshop on the scope of the problem, some solutions and how to get involved will take place at the Maurice D. Hinchey Catskill Interpretive Center in Mount Tremper. The following Saturday, May 21st a field training will be offered at the same time and place. On June 11, again at the CIC, noted Catskills forest historian Dr. Michael Kudish will give a lecture on the history of hemlocks in the Catskills from the ice age forward through the great harvesting of the trees for the tanning industry that once dominated the local economy. For the sake of our environment, our natural history and our economy, all who can attend will be equipped to help the cause of ending this threat. We hope to see you there!

Now Available! Maps of CMC built trails on your iPhone and Android devices!

MapbannerUsing the free PDF Maps App for iPhone or Android from Avenza, and the CMC’s free maps available in their map store, you can now follow your route as you hike the trails built by the Catskill Mountain Club: the Palmer Hill Trail, Shavertown Trail, Andes Rail Trail and Bullet Hole Spur, the Delhi Trails and soon, the Bramley Mountain Trail.  There is also a beta version for Windows phones.

find out more….

 

 

Bramley Mountain Trail Scheduled to Open in Late Spring

BramleyparkingareaWe’ve recently made some real progress in the construction of our new trail on Bramley Mountain. The trail route is nearly finalized… a few more tweaks are needed before we start clearing and grading the path.
The big news is that the parking area has been completed! We want to thank LeFever Excavating for donating culvert pipe and the Clark Companies for donating gravel for the project. Many thanks to SUNY Delhi students for designing and constructing our new trailhead kiosk. And special thanks to the Town of Delhi Highway Department crew and to Superintendent Darren Evans for bringing out the heavy Bramleyroadsidesignequipment and getting the job done. Nice work, guys!

ATV Bill Allowing Access to Park and State Forest Hiking Trails Defeated

Great news! The ATV bill was stricken from the New York state budget. The bill would have allowed ATVs to use the trails in our parks and forests, doing great damage to the environment and creating unsafe conditions for other users. Our efforts, along with those of many other allied organizations including the Adirondack Mountain Club, the New York/New Jersey Trail Conference, the Finger Lakes Trail Conference and the Catskill Center, paid off. Thanks to everyone who sent letters and made phone calls asking Albany to defeat this effort!

NEWS FOR CATSKILLS ALL TRAILS CHALLENGE HIKERS

P1000348Want to report the trail conditions that you find while hiking the CATs? The recently formed CATSKILLS TRAIL CONDITIONS group on Facebook is a great place ot share your information and comments. You’ll need to have a Facebook account to access the group page and to post comments and pictures. By joining, you’ll be sharing helpful up-to-date information with a rapidly growing hiking community, and enjoying other members insights into what you may encounter on your hikes. Win, win! Sign up for a Facebook account and get started by signing in here: www.facebook.com/groups/CatskillsTrailConditions

Help Protect New York’s Parks, Preserves and State Forests from ATVs

We have just learned of a proposal currently being considered by the NY State Senate that will have devastating impacts on potentially all lands managed by the Department of Environmental Conservation and the Department of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation, including the Wilderness and Wild Forest areas of the Catskill Park and of the Adirondack Park – lands that are designated as “forever wild” by the NY State Constitution.

Special interests are trying to push through a bill that will open these protected natural treasures to All Terrain Vehicle (ATV) usage. This irresponsible legislation would allow New York’s 250,000 ATVs access to our parks and forests, where they would gouge deep ruts into trails, illegally ride roughshod off trail, cause extensive and irreparable damage to vegetation, disturb wildlife, and bring noise and pollution into the very heart of our pristine natural recreation areas. It would even allow children as young as 10 to operate these machines on public roads and lands!

This proposal has been included in the state budget bill, “must pass” legislation that will be acted on during the next few days. We appreciate very much our members and friends actions to help us achieve our Catskill Park funding goals to protect and improve the Catskills. Now we must ask you to help prevent this destructive policy from being enacted.

Please follow this link to the Adirondack Mountain Club’s web letter addressed to Governor Cuomo and Senate President Flanagan and let them know that you want this language removed. The letter can be customized with your own comments in the field below the text. Then call your State Senator to let them know what you think. Enter your address here to find your Senator.

Thank you once again for helping to preserve and protect New York’s great Parks and public forests!

 

Spring is Here – Get Ready for Some Ephemeral Wildflower Sightings

March 20, 2016

IMG_3057crThe robins have been back for a week or so now. The snow is long gone except on some shaded slopes of the high peaks and the ice is quickly disappearing. A little chill is in the air for a few days, but mild temperatures have been the rule this winter and they will return very soon. The buds are swelling on some trees and crocus, dwarf daffodils and other early bloomers are showing their colors in sunny, protected environs.

Yep, it seems undeniable that Spring has sprung unusually early here in the Catskills. We may get a late wintry surprise, but at this point it seems unlikely. Time to dust of the field guides, plan the garden and start dreaming of nature’s glorious show that is about to delight us once again.

Take a few minutes and look at our Common Wildflowers of the Catskills page here. It’s sure to please.

 

Parking Problems at Overlook Mountain Trailhead

IMG-20160312-00606 These pictures are from a recent weekend at the Meads trailhead on Overlook Mountain. The popularity of the hike means that the trailhead parking area is full to capacity early on any weekend and on many other days, too. People then park on the sides of the road, often illegally, which creates hazardous conditions for drivers and pedestrians. The narrow road can become difficult for IMG-20160312-00593emergency vehicles to use, so it is crucial that hikers park legally. You can download a map of the area below, which will help you avoid getting a parking ticket.     Overlook_parking

 

 

 

 

 

Print PDF map here: Overlook_parking

IMMEDIATE ACTION NEEDED! LET’S STAND TOGETHER FOR THE CATSKILL PARK AND FOREST PRESERVE!

March 14, 2016

IMG_4171crOver the next several days, the NY State budget for the coming fiscal year will be drawn up. It is crucial that New Yorkers act now to support the budget request for a line in the Environmental Protection Fund designating $4M for the Catskill Park and Forest Preserve. Never before have we had such an opportunity to secure support for the ongoing infrastructure, environmental protection, and community development needs of our Park. When enacted, this budget line will, for the first time, allow long term planning and timely response to developing needs in the Catskills. As we deal with issues from invasive species management to stewardship of our vast public lands and ecosystem, from maintenance and development of recreational facilities to plans for the increasingly greater tourism in the Catskill Park and region, it is incumbent on us to put in place the means for addressing these needs. By securing a line in the annual state budget, we will have the ability to do this important work. The Assembly and the Senate Democrats have agreed to our request. We now need Senate Republicans to sign on.

PLEASE take a minute right now to show your support for the Catskill Park. Catskill Park Coalition member Catskill Mountainkeeper has posted a letter online that you can sign onto. Click here to be taken to the letter: http://www.catskillmountainkeeper.org/park_budget.  Just fill in the required fields and your letter will be delivered. When you’ve finished, please pick up the phone and call Governor Cuomo’s office (518-474-8390) and let him know that you support a dedicated $4M Catskills line in the EPF.

If you live in the Catskills, you can have a significant additional impact by calling your state senator. Their districts and phone numbers are as follows:

James Seward,     S 51               (607) 432-5524

John Bonacic,       S 42               (845) 344-3311

George Amedore, S 46               (845) 331- 3810

The CMC in partnership with nearly 30 other area organizations formed the Catskill Park Coalition to better represent the needs of our Park and area to our state and local government leaders. The fact that we are in a position to accomplish such a significant goal is testament to that vision, to our work and to the support of our communities.

Thank you for your support of this important initiative!

 

Welcome to the (very exclusive) Club

IMG_3627crThe CMC is happy to announce that two more long time hikers have qualified for the Catskills All Trails Challenge Certificate of Completion. Kathy Mario (#18) and Jim Gebhard (#19) completed the requirements this winter. Both Jim and Kathy say that they were encouraged by friends who are themselves qualifiers! That makes us feel like we’ve started something pretty cool.

The Challenge attracts dedicated hikers, new and experienced, to our 350 miles of hiking trails, all of which must be hiked in order to qualify for the awards. Nope, you can’t buy a membership, nor can you buy the shirt or the patch. Not with money, anyway. A little blood, sweat and tears will do. You can learn more about it here.

Watershed Steward Program

cannonsville2Many of us who paddle the Pepacton Reservoir frequently tout its many charms to other paddlers and would-be paddlers.  We also pick up litter and debris we find, and help people who want to know how they can paddle, sail or fish on the Reservoir.  The DEP is looking for people who are interested in doing this in a more formal manner, as part of their pilot Watershed Stewards Program.   If you’d like to join us and become part of this program, click here to learn more and then contact

Lydia Lewis at the DEP at (845) 340-7855 or llewis@dep.nyc.gov

We hope to see you at the training session on March 30th at 6:30 at the Catskill Watershed Corp. in Margaretville.

CATSKILL PARK AWARENESS DAY IS A GREAT SUCCESS

NYS Capitol in winter_commonsimage45 volunteers from the CMC and our Catskill Park Coalition partners paid a visit to Albany yesterday to talk with some 47 members of the New York State Senate and Assembly. We took the message of our plans and needs for the Catskill Park, and its role as a main economic driver for our region, seeking support for funding a wide variety of priorities to improve and protect this great natural ecosystem and recreational destination. These included funds to fight invasive species, build and improve infrastructure, and support programs that help our visitors better enjoy their time in the Catskills. (Read more about our goals and how you can help: https://catskillparkawarenessday.splashthat.com/) CMC President Rick Roberts and Vice President Wendell George served as team leaders for the day, along with six other partners. We are happy to report that we received a great deal of encouragement and support from many of the legislators that we visited.

While there, the Coalition delivered over 1835 petitions of support for our requests to the governor from members of the public. The following weeks will be very important to our success. So, if you have not already, please click on the link above and use it to find and contact your representatives in Albany. Let them know of your support for our efforts. All New Yorkers, and especially those who reside in or love to recreate in the Catskills, will benefit from our success as we BUILD A MODERN PARK.

Catskill Park Awareness Day 2016 – A Time for Action

IMG_2783On February 9, the CMC and some 30 partner organizations of the Catskill Park Coalition will head to Albany to deliver a call to action to our state government leaders. The message will focus their attention on the needs and aspirations of our region and, especially those of the Catskill Park.

Even while we suffered massive cuts in funding for stewardship, planning and capital improvements during the recent great recession, we have had a huge increase in usage. Economic realities that saw many people focus their travel plans closer to home have now combined with increases in visitors from around the world. From feature articles naming the Catskills one of the top “must visit” destinations in the world (see here and here) to Governor Cuomo’s recently announced initiative to spend $5M on advertising to promote the Catskills worldwide, we realize that these important achievements mean that we must rise to the occasion to meet the challenges that the increased use of our recreational assets will bring. On the basis of this knowledge, we are seeking funding for a number of programs and initiatives that will help address these needs.

Please take a look at our list of priorities on the web page linked to here. You will find a sample letter that you can use to send a message of support to your state legislators. You’ll also find a petition to sign that will be delivered with our requests. Your support is crucial to our success, so please act now. It will take a few minutes to inform yourself and act, but the positive results for the Catskills that we love will last for years.

The January 2016 Newsletter is out!

January 2016 NewsletterClick to read
newsletterJan2016picture

 

 

Catskills Lark in the Park Bonus Photo

GiantLedgepanoABosch_r

From Giant Ledge looking across Woodland Valley – ABosch

The leaves are mostly gone here in the Catskills now. There may be a little color left towards the Hudson River, but up in the mountains about the only leaves still on deciduous trees are on beech and oak.

 

So what better time to post this stunning photo taken during the Catskills Lark in the Park and shared with the CMC by Adam Bosch of the NYC DEP? He was visiting Giant Ledge on a gorgeous day and snapped this view across Woodland Valley.

You missed the Lark? Enjoy the picture and then mark your calendar for next year’s Lark events, scheduled for October 1 – 10.

In the meantime, get those snowshoes, crampons and skis ready. It’s almost time to play in the Catskills winter wonderland!

Catskills All Trails (CATs) Series

If you haven’t Hiked Them All yet, you may want to consider joining the Catskill Mountain Club for a Catskills All Trails (CATs) Series hike.

View from Overlook Fire Tower

View from Overlook Fire Tower

These hikes are designed to help interested hikers complete the Catskills All Trails Challenge. They may go to familiar destinations, but they’ll follow lesser-used alternate trail routes to get there. Many of these group hikes include strategic car spotting to allow for straight-through routes in favor of out-and-back routes. You get to travel across more unique trail segments and avoid doubling your efforts as you pursue the challenge. And, as you get deeper into the challenge, let the Catskill Mountain Club guide you to lesser traveled sections of the Catskill Park. Continue reading

We’ve entered the double digits in the Catskills All Trails Challenge!

Congratulations to our Catskills All Trails Challenge Finishers!

#1 David White
#2 Ralph Bressler
#3 Carol White
#4 Mike Dwyer
#5 Ellen Dwyer
#6 George Grzyb
#7 Laura Smith
#8 Ken Morgan
#9 Mark Petrie
#10 Tom Martone
#11 Jim Bryden
#12 Laurel Bryden
#13 Heather Rolland
#14 Rick Taylor
#15 Steve Emanuel

If you’d like to know more about this great milestone of Catskills Hiking, read more …..

The Summer Newsletter is here

Click on the image to view the newsletter
Summer2015Newsletter

CATs Challenge Updates

Now that our harsh Winter of 2015 seems over, hikers are preparing for getting into the woods. We have had several recent inquiries about the Catskills All Trails Challenge that we think many hikers might like to know about.
Several people have asked if hikers must complete road walks when trail segments connect via a road route. The answer is no. The CATs Challenge is to hike the hiking trails.
Some people have wondered about multi-use trails. CATs hikers must hike multi-use trails when one of the designated uses is hiking. You do not need to hike trails that are designated for cycling, equestrian or snowmobile use.
Due to some recent changes to the trail system in the Bluestone Wild Forest, our list of trails has been updated. (You can download it on the CATs page.) The Jockey Hill – Wintergreen Ridge Trail succeeds the Jockey Hill Trial. The entire trail is marked yellow. The distances for the three Onteora Lake Trails (red, blue and yellow) have been adjusted, but the trails remain the same. The most recent map is available on the DEC website: http://www.dec.ny.gov/docs/lands_forests_pdf/recmapbswf.pdf
We will begin posting hikes on some of the less well known and used Catskill Park trails shortly. Please join us for the fun of these explorations in search of sights and features seldom seen.
If you have questions about the CATs Challenge, please email them to activities@catskillmountainclub.org. or ask them in the comments section at the bottom of the CATs page. We are happy to clarify any issues and know that many people will find the answers useful.

Happy hiking!

Hardy CMC members braved the cold to cross country ski at Mountain Trails in Tannersville, Presidents’ Day 2015

We did have the sense to postpone it to Monday from Sunday though.

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Ice Skating, anyone?

Ice skating is another wonderful family activity, as well as great exercise.  You don’t need to know what a salchow is to have a great time out on the ice.

The Town of Delhi, in Delaware County, opened an ice skating rink last year, and it is in frozen operation right now. The rink is located in Sheldon Park near Delware Academy.  The Town of Delhi website says “Ice Skating 2015 Opening Day – Saturday, January 10 — Borrow skates for free on site…or just stand by the fire and watch the cool kids skate”.

Another area rink was just opened in Downsville, in Pepaction Park. Two Downsville women who created the Best Dam 5k in 2013 have turned their efforts and the money raised by the run, to create a free public skating rink.  The Oneonta Daily Star has more details on this terrific effort, here.

Other area rinks are:

  • Badgley Park in the Village of Middleburgh
  • Livingston Manor rink  in Rotary Park on Pleasant Street in Livingston Manor — it has a Facebook page!  (Pleasant St. is one block southwest of the stoplight on Main Street)
  • Hodges Pond, Oneonta —  ice conditions can be checked by calling 607-432-7997
  • Windham Adventure Park
  • If your taste in rinks goes more to the indoor, well groomed rinks, Saugerties has what you’re looking for in the Kiwanis Arena
  • The Empire State Plaza in Albany has turned into Empire Skate Plaza.
  • Mohonk Mountain House, in New Paltz,  has a refrigerated rink in their Pavillion
  • Of course, if you don’t mind travelling further afield, Lake Placid has many skating options

Note that except for the Saugerties and Mohonk indoor rinks, these rinks are subject to the vagaries of our weather.   Ice conditions aren’t guaranteed. Some of these rinks have contacts to call to check conditions and others you’ll have to chance.  Many, but not all, of the above rinks are free to skate.

If you know of any other ice skating rinks in the Catskill region, please let us know!

Andes Rail Trail recipient of PTNY Grant

Immediate Release
Catskill Mountain Club
January  30, 2015
Contact:  Ann Roberti 845-676-3643

The Catskill Mountain Club and Andes Works! announce that they are the recipient of an additional grant from Parks and Trails New York for work on the Andes Rail Trail.  Grant funds were received from PTNY in December to allow the groups to purchase and install a trail registration box and three interpretive signs for the Andes Rail Trail.

The registration box, built by Andes resident Fred Reckner, has already been installed on the trail and is recording the comings and goings as well as comments of users of the trail.  The information garnered from the trail registers is invaluable for planning trail maintenance, for future trail building projects and to support discussions with town governments, business leaders and communities about the benefits of these trails.

“I have always wanted to have an interpretive sign near the old train turntable on the Rail Trail to show trail users how the operators of the train turned the locomotives 180 degrees using only human power and well-designed mechanisms.  It is a fascinating piece of history on the trail that people pass without even noticing” says  Ann Roberti, the CMC leader of the Rail Trail project.   “Having an interpretive sign with pictures and a description of the turntable will be a wonderful addition to the trail.”

Also planned are signs focusing on additional history as well as the flora and fauna of the trail.

The Andes Rail Trail has previously received grants from Parks and Trails NY which funded the construction of the kiosk and roadside sign as well as the printing of an informational brochure and map.

For more information about the Andes Rail Trail, see the link in Where to Go, above.  To learn about becoming a member  of the Catskill Mountain Club, click on the Join/Renew/Donate link above.   To volunteer for our trail building/trail maintenance work, email Wendell  at catskillmountainclub.org.

 

Let it snow!

Img_4033trailIt is really amazing out here in the mountains now!   Now that the first real snow has arrived in the Catskills, it’s time to break out the snowshoes and cross country skis, grab your camera and get out there!

With the right equipment, anyone can have an amazing time!

 

Rime Ice

Rime Ice

 

 

 

snowshoesIf your idea of snowshoes is still oversize wooden tennis rackets, you have to look again.  Snowshoeing is easier and more fun than ever.  New snowshoes are lighter and have teeth to keep the traction on the uphills.  Morgan Outdoors in Livingston Manor, the Storehouse in Phoenicia and Mountain Trails in Tannersville are some local outfitters that rent snowshoes, a great way to give it a try.  You can snowshoe just about anywhere you can hike, but  Rail Trails are great for snow shoeing and  Palmer Hill and Shavertown are places we’ve enjoyed lately.

Cross Country Skiing has also seen improvements in equipment.  Again, you can rent equipment to give it a try — cross country skiing is free at Belleayre Mountain and ski rentals are available at Jimmy’s Ski Shop at the base of Belleayre.  Other great places to ski for free are the Catskills Scenic Trail (packed down by snowmobiles — you’ll be sharing the trail with these courteous folks who have a different idea of outdoor recreation from us) and the Andes Rail Trail.    Mountain Trails in Tannersville has ski rentals and groomed trails.  And new, this winter, the Storehouse in Phoenicia is renting skis.

CMC Board Member and NYNJ Trail Conference Senior Program Coordinator, Jeff Senterman, has some great winter hiking tips in the blog, Adventures in the Outdoors.

The NYNJ Trail Conference maintains a Catskill Mountain Trail conditions page here, and the 3500 Club has a summary of winter trailhead parking area plowing here – keep in mind it may not be 100% accurate any given year — you should always carry a shovel because you might even need to dig out of a parking area after your hike.

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Skiing on the Catskill Scenic Trail in Stamford

Don’t let cold and snow keep you from the trails!

snowshoeingPalmerHillwiththeDEPIf you don’t know what the lucky few of us already know, that hiking in the winter is a different and glorious experience, come and learn more  at the Winter Gear and Gab at Spillian in Fleischmanns on December 14th from 1 to 4 pm.   This event is free and open to the public but you must register by Friday 12/12/2014 (see below).

Avid Catskills hiker, CMC Board Member and Trail Conference Catskills Assistant Program Coordinator, Heather Rolland, will present a short program exploring getting started and getting inspired to get outside this winter, with a focus on gear, safety, and special concerns for kids and dogs while in the great outdoors.

Will Soter, the NYNJTC’s Trails Chair for the southern Catskills, will lead a walk on the Spillian grounds, and discuss the many volunteer opportunities available on local trails.

Local outfitters Kenco The Work & Play Outfitter, Catskill Mountain Storehouse and Morgan Outdoors will be on hand to answer questions about winter gear, offer suggestions for must haves and stocking stuffers, and yes – they will have a wonderful array of great stuff to help you get outside and play.

Refreshments will be served.

With the right gear, anyone can enjoy getting out this winter!

This event is free and open to the public.  Please register by emailing Heather, calling the Trail Conference’s Catskills regional office at 518.628.4243 or by registering on the NYNJTC website.

See more about this event on facebook.

Photo above courtesy of the NYC DEP — CMC members snow shoeing at Palmer Hill Trail on November 29, 2014

 

November 2014 Newsletter is available now!

see our newest and most interesting newsletter yet!

November2014Newsletter

 

It’s “gun” season

Saturday, November 15th was the first day of “regular” deer hunting season, which continues until December 7th. It is followed by muzzle loading and late bow season which go from 12/8 to 12/16.

That doesn’t mean you have to stay out of the woods for these 4 weeks. You can continue to hike if you follow some common sense practices in hunting season:

• Avoid hiking close to dawn and dusk when hunters are more likely to be in the woods
• Wear blaze orange – hats, pack covers, jackets, etc. Do not wear white, which can be mistaken for the flash of a deer’s tail.
• Don’t forget about orange for your pets as well.
• Stay on trails. This is not the best time of year to bushwhack in areas open to hunting.
• Hike where deer, and therefore hunters, are less likely to be found. Don’t hike in areas that you know are popular with hunters.
• If you hear hunters or gunshots, announce in a loud but polite voice, “Hikers on Trail”

Opening weekend is always the busiest for hunters so consider hiking where hunting isn’t allowed. Check nearby state park regulations here and also check propertiess held by land conservancy organizations.

There is no hunting allowed on the newly opened Delhi Trails, a wonderful hiking experience!   Check it out if you have not hiked it yet.  Click here to see more about the Delhi Trails.

If you haven’t tried the Walkway over the Hudson, it’s another great hunting season option. The walkway is 1.3 miles and it is connected to a 3.5 mile paved trail west of the Hudson River and 13 miles east of the Hudson.

Catskill Park All Trails Challenge is Announced by the CMC

October 3, 2014    The Catskill Mountain Club is excited to announce the Catskills All Trails Challenge. If you needed a new excuse, uh “reason”, to go hiking in our beautiful Catskill Park, here it is!
For many years our friends at the Catskill 3500 Club have offered an incentive to share in the joy of climbing each of the Catskill peaks that stand more than 3500 feet high. Thousands of hikers have taken that challenge, met the requirements and been thrilled with the experience.
Now the CMC is offering an opportunity for a different kind of Catskills hiking accomplishment. The new Catskills All Trails (CATs) patch will be awarded to individuals who successfully hike all of the 87 designated hiking trails in the Park, totaling 349.3 miles of trails. Upon completion, hikers will be awarded a Certificate of Completion, recognizing their accomplishment. They will also receive a Catskill Park All Trails patch and shirt to commemorate their feat. But more than anything, they’ll come to know and love all that the Catskills offer to those who enjoy the great outdoors.
The CMC is proud to encourage hikers to explore all parts of the Catskills. Indeed, one of the club’s most important goals is to expose the public to the tremendous hiking in our region, whether to the summits of the high peaks, on the many smaller mountains that offer equally spectacular and sublime views, or in the hollows and valleys with their streams, waterfalls and ponds. Every part of the Catskill Park and region holds great hiking experiences for hikers of all interests and abilities. This new award will honor the most intrepid hikers for their efforts exploring all that the Catskill Park has to offer. Really, what better excuse do you need?
Whether you’re a day hiker or a backpacker, to get started simply go to the CATs page on this website, download the list of trails, grab your boots and gear and GO!

CMC Long Sleeve Moisture Wicking Tees, Just in Time for Fall Hiking!

MensLongSleeveT womensLongSleeveTShow your support for the CMC in style! The CMC’s gear selection has grown to include our very popular moisture wicking tees in a new long sleeve version. We’ve also added some new short sleeve colors, so check those out too. Same great performance and quality at a very affordable price!

Look for them at the CMC’s 10th Anniversary Dinner during the Catskills Lark in the Park, Sunday October 12th at the Catamount Restaurant in Mt. Tremper.

You can also purchase CMC gear online.  All prices include sales tax, shipping and handling.

 

 

The Fall Newsletter — CMC Dinner,Catskills Lark in the Park!

The CMC fall newsletter is out — read about the upcoming CMC dinner, October 12th, and the Catskills Lark in the Park….

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For Upcoming Events, Check out the 11th Annual Catskills Lark in the Park Schedule

As a founding partner of the Catskills Lark in the Park, the CMC takes great pride in the wealth of various outdoor activities offered each year to recreational enthusiasts during this great celebration of the Catskill Park’s founding. These events are led by volunteers from many organizations that regularly organize outings in the Catskill region. Many are led by CMC members.

Together with our partners, the Catskill Center, the New York/New Jersey Trail Conference and the NYS DEC, we look forward to seeing you out and about in the Catskills this year from October 4 through October 13.  Come for one event or for 10 days full of activities. Pick your pleasure from hikes, paddles, cycling trips, natural and cultural explorations, educational events and more – truly something for everyone!

After the Lark, regular CMC scheduling will resume.

 

New Delhi Trails Opened by the CMC

DSC_1022rcrAugust 30, 2014  –  The Catskill Mountain Club opened the newly constructed Delhi Trails on Saturday, August 30. The well attended ceremony was held at the trailhead in the Immanuel Lutheran Church parking lot on SR 28 in Delhi. Amy Beveridge, project coordinator and CMC board member,  welcomed the crowd and thanked several community organizations and property owners for their support in making the new trails possible. The Delhi Trails were built on lands that belong to the Delaware Academy Central Schools, to the Village of Delhi and to the Immanuel Lutheran Church. They were built with the assistance and financial support of the Town of Delhi, the Bassett Healthcare Network O’Connor Hospital,  the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Delaware County, the Rural Health Alliance, the Catskill Ladies Association to Support and Inspire (C.L.A.S.I.) and by SUNY Delhi. Many individuals came out to help with construction, and their efforts were greatly appreciated by all.

After the brief remarks, the crowd headed out onto the trails for an inaugural hike. The weather was perfect and so were the trails as nearly 40 people enjoyed the beautiful woods, cliffs and views. The three trails, two named for characters in the novel My Side of the Mountain by Jean Craighead George and one in honor of the Delaware Academy mascot Bulldogs, together cover about 4.5 miles and offer the option of shorter hikes of varying degrees of difficulty. The longer Gribley Trail crosses the mountain ridge above the village in a little over three miles. The Bulldog Run can be combined wih a section of the Gribley to create a loop hike of over two miles. And the Frightful Falls Trail is a short connector, the steepness of which makes its name seem appropriate.IMG_3449cr

This trail project is another built by the CMC to bring hiking opportunities closer to Catskill communities. The trails are designed to accommodate hikers of all ages and most abilities. The CMC feels that these trails will contribute to the physical, social and economic health of our communities. Offering the ability to easily access a place to go for a hike, however long or short, is an important way to help individuals maintain their health. The availability of a nearby place to spend time alone or with friends, family and children will offer a wonderful opportunity for relaxation, fun and meaningful time spent together in an awe inspiring and peaceful setting. And visitors from near and far will avail themselves of the services provided by local businesses when they come to town for a hike. We are convinced that everyone will benefit in some way from the presence of these new trails and that the Catskills will become an even better place to live and to visit.

For more information about the trails, including maps, visit the CMC website at catskillmountainclub.org. And please consider becoming a member while you’re there. Your support will help with our work to improve outdoor recreational facilities and access in the Catskills.

New Bear Hunting Season Begins

The NYS DEC has decided to implement a new bear hunting season in the Catskills. The early season begins September 6 and runs until September 21. This additional hunting season coincides with one of the most attractive and busy hiking seasons in the Catskills. Because plants continue to be fully leafed out, visibility will be more difficult for all concerned and extra caution is important.

The CMC urges all hikers to wear blaze orange caps and/or vests when hiking. It is advisable to hike in groups in order to increase visibility and draw attention to your presence in the woods. Be observant, be careful and be safe.

Another CMC Trail Opening! Join us on August 30th at 2 pm in Delhi to celebrate the creation of the newest trail.

WendellInfrontofRockSmallersmallSquare TownViewImg_3449SmallSq TrailWorkerGroupShot Trail boardwalk DogAndRockLedgeSMallSquare

August 15, 2014  –  The CMC, in partnership with key community members and organizations including Village, Town, and the School boards, Immanuel Lutheran Church and O’Connor Hospital created this lovely multi-route trail system.  Meet at the Immanuel Lutheran Church parking lot at 2:00 p.m. and join Catskill Mountain Club members and volunteers as they lead guided hikes on the four miles of much anticipated, newly established hiking trails.

The Delhi hiking trails consist of over four miles of hiking trails, named for beloved characters in the classic 1959 children’s novel My Side of Mountain which was set in Delhi.

Read more about the Delhi Trails here in the press release

The Catskill Mountain Club News for Summer 2014 is here!

August 12, 2014  –  The Summer 2014 CMC News is chock full of interesting news and information. Learn some valuable tips for taking that perfect photograph on your hike. Find out about the Finger Lakes Trail and its 90 mile plus route through the Catskills. Read about how to have a good time hiking while improving your physical fitness (yes, even couch potatoes can hike)!  Check it out here.

Did you know that you can get the CMC News sent to your inbox for free? We’d love to have you join the club, but if you’d like to give it a test drive first you can sign up for the newsletter and our announcements via email here. Just provide your contact information and check yes for “Send Me All Event Announcement Emails”. You can unsubcribe at any time by clicking the link at the bottom of the announcement.

The NYC DEP highlights CMC trails in Newsletter

coverDEPNewsletter July 21, 2014  –  The Shavertown Trail made the cover of the DEP’s Watershed Recreation Newsletter.

To read the full story, click the image and go to page 7.

Maps of Palmer Hill, Shavertown and Andes Rail Trail/Bullet Hole Spur available here!

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You can now print your own map of The Palmer Hill Trail, the Shavertown Trail and the Andes Rail Trail/Bullet Hole Spur.   You can also see them live and interactive!

 

Trail Printable Map Live Map
 IMG_024SpringVista from Palmer Hill

Palmer Hill Trail

Click Here to Open Printable Map Click Here
 ShavertownsummerbyLillianBrowne_ubp

Shavertown Trail

Click Here To Open Printable Map Click Here
 walkingTheTrail

Andes Rail Trail/

Bullet Hole Spur

Click Here To Open Printable Map Click Here

Driving directions to the three trails can be found here

 

Map software provided by  www.MappingSupport.com

Palmer Hill Trail Opens to the Public

DSC_0901r_TMJune 9, 2014 – We woke up to a lovely day on Saturday, National Trails Day. And that wasn’t half as good as the rest of it! Over 50 people assembled at the trailhead of the brand new Palmer Hill Trail to celebrate our work and new prize. After a brief ceremony featuring remarks by Andes Town Supervisor Marty Donnelly, NYC DEP Recreation and Property Manager Charlie Laing and CMC President Rick Roberts, we had some refreshments, congratulated one another on a great partnership and its beautiful product and headed off for one of our more satisfying hikes in quite a while.

 

The Palmer Hill Trail consists of three segments that can be hiked in four distinct combinations, allowing hikers the options of short and easy hikes or moderately strenuous and longer hikes. The hiker can make complete routes of 1.2, 2.2, 2.7 or 3.7 miles. Each takes you through beautiful wildflower meadows that offer wide open views of the surrounding mountains and hills and of the bucolic scenery that Delaware County epitomizes. Along the way are centuries old foundations, a lovely stream and age old trees. In season, there will be blackberries and apples galore for the hungry hiker. And in winter the cross country skiing will be a dream come true.

DSC_0910r_TMThe importance of this partnership between the DEP and the CMC is hard to overstate. With the help of the Town of Andes, we have collaborated on two new trails on DEP lands in less than a year, having opened the Shavertown Trail on August 30 of last year. Later this year we’ll open a trail on Bramley Mountain in the Town of Delhi. And there will be more to come, including one on the south side of the Ashokan Reservoir in Ulster County and, eventually, in both Greene and Sullivan Counties.

By making these properties available for public recreation, without fee or required permit, the DEP has made an important commitment to the needs of the residents of the Catskills. The benefits to the health and economies of our communities are already being felt. The CMC is thrilled to have an opportunity of this magnitude to work towards the success of our mission of promoting non-motorized outdoor recreation that is sustainable and environmentally responsible and that benefits the physical and economic health of our local communities.

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The Palmer Hill Trail will be a destination for those who love the Catskills and want to experience them as never before. So come out and enjoy the views. And, if you don’t already know, see one of the finest panoramas of the Catskill High Peaks anywhere. I won’t tell you where to look for it – come find out for yourself!

See video of the opening here. Thanks to Jessica Vecchione.

A Special Thanks to the Palmer Hill Trail Volunteers

IMG_3039crMany hikers and passers-by notice the signs that point us to the fabulous hiking trails that dot our fair Catskills. Most don’t think to ask how did that get here or who put that there. The truth is that the construction of new trails is an enormously labor intensive project – volunteers (yes, you read that correctly) spent well over 400 hours planning and building the new Palmer Hill Trail.

So with that said, I would like to extend an equally enormous thank you to those volunteers. They are truly deserving of thanks from all of us who hike and from those who understand the importance and ways of being good stewards of our natural resources. Their efforts benefit our personal health, our community health and our environmental health by giving us a chance to get out and experience the great outdoors. How better to learn?

Let me also invite you who are appreciative of this gift to join with us in the unending task of maintaining the Palmer Hill Trail and others in the Catskills, both those that the CMC has built and those that were given to us by previous generations of dedicated and generous hikers. You will be passing something of great value on to future generations.

Wendell George
Stewardship Chair
wendell@catskillmountainclub.orgIMG_2816cr

An Enormous Thank You to:

Ann Roberti          Bob Moses
Fred Reckner       Bill Palmer
Jeff Ditchek          John Exter
Rich Johnson       Austin Petrone
Edie Mesick          Laura Sanford
Kathy Mario          Tom Miano
Gale Kabat           Howard Raab
Nick Verni             Lou Capello
Bud Gladstone

Check out the CMC Spring 2014 newsletter

May 15, 2014  –  The Spring Newsletter is here!  We invite you to read here. There’s a great article on hiking with your dog, a book review, updates on the club goings on and the announcement of our new Lifetime Membership!   And news about the great new CMC wicking shirts and caps

!CMC shirts_green_blueIMG_3015       AnnBobWendellAtPalmerLillianBrownDSC_0109       CMC capsIMG_3009

Work set to begin on new Palmer Hill Trail in Andes

IMG_2773smallSizeApril 15, 2014  –  This is the view you’ll have at the start of the Palmer Hill Trail.   Yesterday the CMC got approval from the DEP for the route we’ve planned, and work will begin on the trail very soon. The Palmer Hill trail will be a very different Catskills hiking experience, taking you through beautiful open fields with ancient trees and stone walls in addition to wooded portions. At the right time of year you can even find a snack as there are several great apple trees near the trail.

Look for the grand opening of this trail on June 7th! If you are interested in helping with trail building and haven’t already signed up as a trail worker, please email Wendell@CatskillMountainClub.org.

Wonderful article on our new Andes trails in Kaatskill Life

KaaterskillArticleCover

April 10, 2014  –  A big Thank You to Peter Senterman and Kaatskill Life for this great article on the Andes Rail Trail/Bullet Hole Spur and the Shavertown Trail.

The article states: “All in all, this is one of the nicest trails in the area, interesting in its variety, and a comfortable trail for those who like to wander in the woods. It is short enough to walk in a couple of hours, and interesting enough for repeated visits. The Catskill Mountain Club did a superb job with this trail. Congratulations!”

We couldn’t agree more!

Hopefully they’ll like the coming Palmer Hill trail just as much.

(click the picture or here to read the article)

Discover & Explore the NEW Andes Rail Trail
by Pete Senterman
Reprinted with permission from Kaatskill Life, Spring 2014

 

Fantastic Day at Kaaterskill Falls, Sunset Rock, Inspiration Point

 

IMG_2756rwaterfall

 

March 16, 2014  –  Sunday’s trip to Kaaterskill Falls and the North Lake area couldn’t have been better….see for yourself!    You’ll think “Hudson River School” looking at quite a number of the pictures.

 

 

 

Click continue reading to see the slideshow.

Continue reading

Our Friends at CRISP are Seeking Volunteers to Help Fight Aquatic Invasive Species in the Catskills

2014BoatStewards (2) March 5, 2014  –  CRISP is gearing up to educate the public about the problem of aquatic invasive species in the Catskills. Find out how you can help by volunteering for a few days this summer. You’ll be providing a public service and learning some skills while gaining valuable experience, too.

Click on the image for more information.

Think Spring and Cycling in the Catskills

March 3,2014  –  Want to learn more about cycling in the Catskills?    Check out a great post from Anton Tutter, co-author of the cycling blog, Riding the Catskills, which chronicles off-the-beaten-path cycling routes in the region.    In this post, he shares his adventures cycling over some beautiful, rugged Delaware County roads as he “pass hunts” his way from Bloomville to Bovina to Andes and back to Bloomville.   His description and photos will have you longing for bicycling weather – as if this winter wasn’t already doing that for some.  Check out other rides in the Catskills at the rest of the website as well.

Last summer, Anton wrote:  “I recently rode a hilly 45-mile route that connects three neighboring villages to retrace childhood memories; each holds fond memories for me. But more relevant to this post, cycling between these villages is a fun adventure in pass hunting– the sport of riding over mountain passes towards a goal of having completed a defined number of passes within a region. Popular in France (rules of the game), it’s gaining popularity here in the US. It’s sort of the cycling equivalent of hiking clubs, where the goal is to have hiked over a defined group of mountain peaks. So instead of following major roads between the villages that skirt around and thereby avoid the mountains, I opt to ride up and over the mountains along the most remote, least traveled mountain passes and carriage roads I can find, choosing dirt over pavement wherever possible”.

Read the rest of this great post  here.   Check out the other great posts on Riding the Catskills as well.